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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2008
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    32

    Default Question about commission

    I'm an amateur rider looking for my next horse. I have found a few that I want to go try. I want to bring my trainer with me for her opinion, but now I'm a bit unsure of how commission would work if I'm the one finding the horses. I would be the one talking with the seller and discussing price etc. Trainer would just be there as a "yes this one is suitable" or "no walk away." Just wondering what other people have done in this situation. I am happy to pay a fee for my trainers time to come see the horse, but her usual 10% commission seems a bit steep for just a "yes" or "no" and not actually having to act as the agent. Thoughts?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Default

    This can go whatever way you and your trainer agree on beforehand.

    Sit down with your trainer and discuss it, agree on something and move forward knowing what was agreed upon.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    12,360

    Default

    And what ever you agree on, it sounds harsh, but put it in writing.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2000
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    5,750

    Default

    If a trainer is spending time to assess the horse, they typically get a commission.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    My adventures as a working rider

    theworkingrider.blogspot.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2005
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    In a barn
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    Default

    ^^^ this

    Talk to your trainer.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,502

    Default

    You aren't just paying for the trainer's time, but their opinion and expertise. Talk to your trainer ahead of time to sort this out as it is totally up to them, not us on COTH, what they will want to charge.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2013
    Posts
    406

    Default

    For me, I paid a flat fee when I had my trainer come out on a horse I had found, and I paid that whether I bought the horse or not. IF he found the horse, he would have received a commission.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 3, 2009
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I try to be fair about it. If one of my customers found the horse on their own and I don't have to travel far to go see it, I just charge them by the hour (Lesson price).

    If I have spent 3 months watching videos, calling, emailing and I have to travel, even 15% is not worth the amount of time I have invested at that point, so I am not negotiable.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2011
    Posts
    367

    Default

    Different trainers have different methods of handling this. As others have said, you need to discuss this ahead of time so you know what to expect. My current trainer's policy is that he receives a commission for ANY input given. So under the scenario you describe, I would definitely owe him the full 10% or whatever his fee was. Is that a steep price? Maybe. But sales (and purchases) are the a huge portion of what supports most professionals and allows them to stay in business. I would say it is most common for trainers to be owed if they give any input whatsoever. But there are certainly other arrangements out there; in fact, at one point I had a trainer (lesser known) who didn't charge any commission for what you describe. She was, however, an exception to the rule.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2015
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Talk to your trainer BEFORE you look at any horses.

    I was horseless (sold one horse, then my other horse died) and my trainer felt horrible so insisted we didn't have to do anything. We bought her lunch and gave her a gift card. She said we shouldn't have, but she did appreciate it and of course we appreciated her expertise and company!
    She wears short skirts, I wear jodhpurs, She's cheer captain and I'm jumping oxers.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Posts
    1,393

    Default

    generally treated like coaching at a show or lesson, depending on distance/time commitment.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    644

    Default

    Depends on the coach, but in the H/J world getting a commission on the deal is the norm, even if it doesn't cost them a lot of time. It's just part of the business, if they are involved, they get a cut. Do the sellers a favour, and let them know that you will be coming with your coach....or will be having a coach involved at a later time. That will give them the opportunity to leave some room for the coach if they get approached for some added commission. Most coaches prefer to source the horses and deal within their own channels.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
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    1,726

    Default

    If you're the one who found the horse you end up buying, don't think of it as a commission but as a consultation. You are compensating your trainer for her time and expertise.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vandenbrink View Post
    Do the sellers a favour, and let them know that you will be coming with your coach....or will be having a coach involved at a later time. That will give them the opportunity to leave some room for the coach if they get approached for some added commission.
    I do not understand what you are saying here?

    If the OP has a trainer, the OP will be paying their trainer whatever the agreed upon commission/fee is. The seller is not paying the OP's trainer anything.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
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    3,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenixrises View Post
    For me, I paid a flat fee when I had my trainer come out on a horse I had found, and I paid that whether I bought the horse or not. IF he found the horse, he would have received a commission.
    This is what I would expect. You're buying their time and knowledge and owe them for that no matter what decision you make. If you expect to only pay when you buy a horse then it would be commission.
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    644

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I do not understand what you are saying here?

    If the OP has a trainer, the OP will be paying their trainer whatever the agreed upon commission/fee is. The seller is not paying the OP's trainer anything.
    Sellers frequently get asked to also pay a commission to the trainer....a seller's commission, without knowledge of the buyer.

    This is why some sales ads are so vague about asking price, quoting a range, or asking you to inquire. Some sellers will want to leave room to pay everyone that needs to get paid in order to get the horse sold...if they are comfortable participating in that type of arrangement.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
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    5,155

    Default

    Most of my students do their own legwork. They pay me for my time when I actually go with them to look at a horse, and for my time if I go to the vet check with/for them. I do not charge for sitting at home watching videos, but I could see that being fair as well.

    This seems more fair all around vs commission...particularly as my students usually shop in the low end and a standard 10% commission wouldn't cover my gas money if they had me driving all over!
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Posts
    12,495

    Default

    I would be thrilled to only pay a 10% commission. All the trainers I know of now charge 15%.
    "Dyslexics Untie!"



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2006
    Location
    PA
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    1,269

    Default

    If you are *truly* doing this on your own... and it is simply a lesson/coaching, looking over the horse, does he look sound, can he do the job, do you like him too? scenario, then compensate for time and coaching.

    HOWEVER, that means trainer is not watching videos beforehand, reviewing sale ads, negotiating price. Maybe they know the price and will say yes or no they agree his is over or under priced. They will not bargain after the PPE. You are doing this on your own for better or worse.

    So if you only need help during the time confined to the actual test ride and trial period, then compensate for time. I'd guestimate hourly lesson fee (or more since it is a loss of on farm business) during the whole time they are gone, including travel, plus a meal if it is a long trip. It would have to be worth their while to go look at horses with you where perhaps instead they'd be teaching a group lesson or two. If you plan on doing this multiple times you may be better off paying commission depending on the price range you are buying in.

    Good luck horse shopping!!! It is my experience as an amateur that I always know what I am looking for and when I find a good fit, but the PPE and negotiation on horses showing up/leaving trial when horse wasn't represented accurately was what i needed a trainer for, and that's the stuff you don't think about beforehand!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,395

    Default

    My trainer only charges for her time/travel expenses when she has a client buying a horse. The usual 10% when selling a horse.
    This is something you should discuss with the trainer before you ever start seeing horses. If she's gonna charge commission anyways you might as well have her do some of the leg work to make it worth your money.



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