The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1

    Default Very general "what would you pay"

    Thinking about taking a project pony for resale if I find the right one but was hoping to get various responses on what general price I could expect to get for hypothetical pony. No wrong answer, just wondering what YOU would pay for the following type of pony...

    12.2-14.2 hands

    3-9 year old

    Sound and barefoot

    Easy keeper (defined as: healthy or slightly plump on pasture without history of founder)

    Quiet, easy attitude and safe for kids to handle on the ground

    Maybe not finished under saddle, but fine for a child's point and shoot, steer and squeeze type ride- consistent, steady, and responsive enough to walk/trot/canter both directions and move (at minimum) decently off leg laterally

    Jumps 2' courses safely

    Maybe not very fancy, but cute enough and has been out to schooling shows and will be able to do lower-level hunter/jumper shows...short stirrup through 2'-2'6" potential or low-level eventing with more training

    What could you expect to get for that kind of pony? $1000? $2000?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2003
    Location
    Mississippi, U.S.A.
    Posts
    778

    Default

    $2500 and up. I wouldn't call a pony who could do all that a project pony. A pony that can do that is accomplished and if he is gentle, consistent, and honest over fences I would expect him to be quite valuable- as in worth his weight in gold. ;-) Good luck.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Pony would be a project for me, but this is the "finished product" I'd be selling. I just wasn't sure how much "fancy" plays a part in price. I'm also a little unsure how to classify a pony as green/unfinished. I still consider my 4yo TB very green, but he is very good off your leg laterally, very sensitive to your seat/thighs, and is very adjustable throughout gaits. Kids generally don't ask for all that- it is more squeeze/kick and tug on reins and pony just needs to do its job- so I don't know how much the pony should know as far as being well-schooled in flatwork (maybe I am putting too much dressage thought into it?).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,868

    Default

    Maybe I'm not quite understanding your post but on my FB pages, there are really nice ponies, smaller horses who are free or under $400. But, I live in OR and the economy isn't the greatest and people are giving up really swell horses due to losing their place or losing their boarding barn situ. Some of these ponies are cute but I don't exactly know what you mean by 'fancy'.

    You could give it a shot with one pony and see what happens.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2012
    Posts
    505

    Default

    Alter,

    I think that it will still be a tough sale.

    2500 - 3500 used to be the price range for what you've described, but the market is flooded right now, so unless your pony is fancy or has a particular niche, I think you'll have trouble getting your money out at that stage of training.

    I think what's selling right now are truly finished ponies, with a legitimate show record, or with a lot of local miles that hasn't broken it's green if we're talking about a hunter pony, and packers.

    If you really want to do this, I would go with the fanciest prospect you can afford (no odd colors, no obvious confo flaws) and would plan on keeping it a little longer and getting it a bit more finished.

    JMO and YMMV.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6

    Default

    FWIW, I have a pony that sells himself.

    The day I brought him home -- pot bellied, some rain rot, feet in horrible shape -- I had people offering to buy him.

    He's 2.5 now, 13.3ish, string tests to about 14.2. Grade -- has some draft in him, so has the cute hairy pony thing going for him. Not a hunter prospect, but a cute mover for lower-level dressage and, I think, possibly eventing (you can't keep him out of water, so no worries on that account).

    I haven't had one offer for him over $500. Even after I get him going W/T/C, I wouldn't expect to be able to sell him for more than $750-$1,000. And this is a pony who sells himself. There just isn't a $$$ market that I can see.

    [Note: I bought him as a potential lower-level, all-around pony for me. I don't intend to sell him, but if he's not my kind of ride, he will eventually be for sale. So I have been watching ads, etc, to gauge the market. Or lack of market.]



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2006
    Location
    VA (or MS during the school year)
    Posts
    2,487

    Default

    They are a dime a dozen around here. Even if you kept him longer and put more miles and show experience on him, you are still going to be trying to compete with a lot of other ponies who are just as nice.

    IMO, even if you would keep him at home and wouldn't have to pay board, you'll still be spending more in purchase price + hay/vet/farrier than what you will get for him.
    "People ask me 'will I remember them if I make it'. I ask them 'will you remember me if I don't?'"



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,062

    Default

    I think $1k to $2k unless it can go and compete right away. I do think that there's a market for this type of pony, but it tends to go to pony club/ local show kids who have access to a limited amount of instruction. They don't necessarily look for fancy, but they do look for miles. And as an investment, it can be hard to put much training/ show mileage in and still break even. Your odds are best if it is 14.2-ish as then you can market it to small adults too.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks for the replies...for whoever asked, when I say fancy I mean cute typey head, a little more delicate looking, flashy trot, suitable for pony divisions at rated shows. The type of pony I'd end up may be more coarse, perhaps a bigger head, thicker, or maybe an Arab type.
    I've seen like very cheap or free ponies that look interesting, no more than a couple hundred bucks. Pony would be at home so no board. We have plenty of hay for over winter stocked up.

    I'm not looking for something to bring in a high price, just hoping at best to find a fun pony to play with and make a thousand bucks max on.

    I own a 12.2 coarse Welsh cross, maybe a QH? that I constantly get offers on to buy for several thousand. He wins in any local hunter or jumper class crossrails through 2'6", is safe consistent, does games, awesome but a little hot on trails. I was hoping to make up a similar pony (I trained this pony too) and sell it with just a little less mileage to a local kid that wants an all-arounder. I would sell mine, but too much personal attachment so I leased him til I need him again.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2012
    Posts
    505

    Default

    Alter,

    What makes your other pony attract offers is his resume, his mileage, and that the offerers have seen him around at shows doing his solid, consistent job for years.

    Taking a 4 yo green pony and replicating the pony you have know is really a 3 - 4 year project, not a quick flip. If you want to do it for fun, and don't need to get the money back out right away or ever, then it's a great idea.

    If you really need this to be a money maker, don't do it.

    IME, the only way projects like this this worked for me is if I was in a situation where I could put mileage on the project cheaply - like access to a busy lesson program or working students where you can put kids/students on as appropriate, and there are trailers going to lots of different venues where you throw project pony on the trailer if there's an empty spot.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2008
    Posts
    326

    Default

    12.2 is a hard market unless you've got something with a lot of miles. Small ponies are quickly outgrown, and a difficult sell unless they can guarantee safe, consistent show miles for a small child just starting out.

    If you can get a top of the line medium or large, you're going to have a much easier sell.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    I've sold 3 large ponies this year. All were cute, quiet, sound, flashy but not superstar hunters or anything. Just good all around types, pony club types. Plenty of market still for these. You're not going to make a huge profit but you don't have to put out a lot to buy them either. Aim for $500 (purchase price) and 5 months (when you sell). Still can get $3000+ for the good ones. You have to be diligent and get them out to the shows, school XC, trail rides, etc.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2003
    Location
    somewhere. out there.
    Posts
    2,399

    Default

    If this is going to be a pony for kids, make sure you have a kid hat can show it in the pony classes for mileage. If you're and adult, you can't show the pony classes (duh), and can find it hard to prove the pony is "kid safe, at shows".



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McGurk View Post
    Alter,

    What makes your other pony attract offers is his resume, his mileage, and that the offerers have seen him around at shows doing his solid, consistent job for years.

    Taking a 4 yo green pony and replicating the pony you have know is really a 3 - 4 year project, not a quick flip..

    At least a year maybe two and to get top dollar the horse needs to successfully campaigned ... then no problem selling it as the grand parents will want to drop major money for a finished, proven pony.

    Our Morgan horse Foxie was a project pony at under 14.2 ... we never intended on selling her but continued to receive offers that were unrealistic..the finial one was a blank check


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eponacelt View Post
    If this is going to be a pony for kids, make sure you have a kid hat can show it in the pony classes for mileage. If you're and adult, you can't show the pony classes (duh), and can find it hard to prove the pony is "kid safe, at shows".
    This only applies if you are marketing for pony hunter/children's hunter pony. This is only a very small set of pony buyers. An adult can easily show a pony in puddle jumpers, pre/baby green hunters, eventing, dressage, fox hunting, etc. I've sold dozens of ponies and not one of them ever had a child rider in their time with me. This never stopped a potential sale. The kid comes and tries the pony out, they see all of my videos of the pony at horse shows, XC, etc. and they sell very quickly.

    I also disagree with the 1 to 2 years comment. Maybe if you never ride it, or buy a 2 year old! But I've never had to hold on to one that long in this price range. Yes, if you want $15K++++ and want to sell it as a made show pony, then you need to put a lot more time/shows into it. But I don't think that is the type of pony the OP is talking about!

    Case in point: I bought an unbroke, 14hh 4 year old welsh/TB cross filly in April. Broke her out, took her on lots of trail rides, schooled her OF at a few local shows, got her jumping a small course (2') w/ changes, got her very good at voice commands, very broke on the ground, etc. Still green but she was quiet and had been exposed to a lot of things (and hauled frequently). Sold in September (less then 2 weeks after I posted the ad). Made very good money on her. No child rider. I never even got the chance to take her to her first intro level event (which I had plans to do at the end of that month).



  16. #16

    Default

    At least a year maybe two and to get top dollar the horse needs to successfully campaigned ... then no problem selling it as the grand parents will want to drop major money for a finished, proven pony.
    Totally agree with this statement. If you have a proven little pony that is fun and safe for my granddaughter, you can easily pry $2,500 to $3,000 out of me for it. If the pony is also fancy, I might go higher. Also agree that the larger pony is better.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    974

    Default

    I think, depending on where you are located and how you market the pony... you can get more.
    I do think you need to be really specific about the pony's personality and its type.

    I just sold a 14'3, plain bay but a cutie, above average mover, easy keeper, schooling 1st level dressage and jumping 2'6-2'9 courses, 6 year old pony (ok not pony size, but he is a pony breed), had been shown, had gone XC schooling (would be ready for BN in spring) for 7,000 after being on the market for less than a month in Ohio.

    With that said, I wouldn't expect to do this again, unless I was able to get the exact same pony or a pony that has a very similar attitude and life outlook.
    -Chelsie
    "Hell yes I can ride. I was riding when I fell off!"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    I would say it depends on your area. I don't know where people are seeing kid safe show ponies that are $1k to $3k. Really? I wouldn't bother even taking a pony to a show for that price! I just sold a 3 year old Haffie that was solid w/t and green at the canter, was doing small cross rails and trot poles, and was quiet quiet quiet for $3,500 without the person batting an eye. I bought her in June scraggly looking, thin, not broke for $600 for her and her sister. Sold her sister after 40 days for $1,000 and kept the one to use as a lesson pony 5 days a week and sold her in Nov.

    I have another pony who I use for lessons , has done ct, a B show in short stirrup, and hunter paced and I have turned down offers for him as he is firmly in the low 5 figure range as he pulls his weight every week.

    So to OP check and see what ponies are going for in your area. Do a check on what has sold that is in the same type as what you would buy. You might be able to get ok money, or you may just say "Nah not worth it"



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 110
    Last Post: Sep. 17, 2013, 06:44 PM
  2. Replies: 14
    Last Post: Sep. 16, 2013, 05:46 PM
  3. "General purpose" saddle suggestions?
    By froglander in forum Eventing
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: Nov. 24, 2011, 09:27 AM
  4. "Armchair General" Game
    By denny in forum Eventing
    Replies: 92
    Last Post: Apr. 30, 2009, 03:50 PM
  5. Replies: 59
    Last Post: Oct. 17, 2008, 06:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness