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  1. #21
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    No.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    I have some kids that write bizarrely--left handed, write from the top of the page almost upside down. It's weird how they pick it up. I was told if you really don't train them to hold the pencil correctly by 1st grade, there's not much you can do, unless of course you do the old-fashioned methods used with poor lefties.
    The reason we lefties do that is to avoid smearing our hand across what we've just written.
    (Although I progressed to a different method of holding the implement so that my hand moves below the line I'm writing.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Jun. 24, 2006
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    I have an awkward pencil grasp (think writing like a leftie with my right hand) and cursive is way more comfortable for me. Printing kills my hand after a few minutes. I Aldo think cursive is much nicer looking.

    I think they should learn it and don't see why not.



  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat View Post
    I think of all the historical documents that were recorded in cursive. 75 years from now, will the average person be able to look at them and know what they say or will this require and interpreter?

    I work with hand-written documents that date back to the mid-1800s and occasionally earlier. Even though I grew up writing and reading cursive, those documents are NOT easy to read. It really is almost a different language at times, and it's not just the penmanship. However, there's one man in particular whose writing grew worse as he got older. Many of his last documents are nearly illegible but can be figured out if we take our time.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.



  5. #25
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    Aside from my signature, I pretty much never write in cursive.

    We were taught in third grade. I used it up through about middle school. After that I just started printing again. No one cared. I have mediocre penmanship, but my printing is much more legible than my cursive. And honestly, I know very few other adults using cursive. Everyone I work with prints.



  6. #26
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    Next kids won't learn to print, to draw, to hold a pen... computers and tablets and phones are not the answer to everything, but go ahead, dumb education some more. There won't always be a keyboard available!

    I love a beautiful cursive handwriting. It is a good representation of your personality too.
    In French, they have already tried to dumb down spelling. Why is it so difficult for younger generations to learn to spell correctly? We learned!! Are they that much more stupid? Why should we always bring everything to the lowest denominator? oh, I forgot self-esteem... Stupid!


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    When I started school, the first two grades I was left handed.
    We had wooden led pencils, inkwells, "feathers" and blotters to write with.
    Then the new third grade teacher made all write right handed.

    Several of us had to spend almost a whole year staying after school learning to write clearly again, with the right hand.

    I think it is sensible to teach kids hand writing, but not make it an impossible, terribly hard task for so many that just can't be that good at it.
    Oh, the woe of the leftie! My grandmother was beaten into writing with her right hand by the nuns at her school in the 'old country'. My mother was 'convinced' it was a better idea by the nuns at her school in New York. She is ambidextrious.

    Me? Well....my mom kept putting the marker in my right hand in my preschool days, saying I should practice with the proper hand. As soon as she left the room, marker went right back into my left hand....I am not sure how I would have dealt with nuns since I was such a determined child.

    I do not think cursive writing is something terribly important to learn in school. It just is not important in any aspect of life and I do not know if it aids any kind of dexterity development. I write all my checks in cursive that is OK to ready, but write in all caps, when I write anything by hand. I almost always write on a computer when writing something that someone else needs to read, for work and personal use. This seems to be the way things are going.


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  8. #28
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    Apr. 4, 2010
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    I think it should be taught still, but not drilled to exhaustion.

    Another leftie here and i never understood how other southpaws could write with their hand all curled overtop the page! Looks quite uncomfortable. I write with my hand below the line, like mentioned.
    I'm also another one who writes in a hybrid cursive, print, capital and lower case character style. My r's are almost always capped, my f's totally illegible (get confused for l's), my s's swirl into the next letter, and my capital E's piss me off (just can't write a pretty one).
    My signature is always cursive, but you can only read my first name and first three or four letters of my last name. And sometimes the last letter. And all those times I made fun of my mom's blurry signature when I was a kid!!
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  9. #29
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    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Lovely handwriting is so nice to see. I used to write much better than I do now.
    I have heard that if you spend so much time typing on a keyboard you lose that ability to write. Sad but true.
    I am a leftie, but was never forced to write right handed.
    I am sad that kids do not know how to write cursive. We called it penmanship.
    They had special big lined paper where you practiced upper and lower case letters in first grade.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  10. #30
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    I think writing should still be taught, but then again I believe that they should not use calculators or computers until they learn the read, write, add, subtract, multiply, divide, you know the basics. I also think they should also know how to use the card catalogues and find the sources. The older generations did it and did not 'die' why cant the younger ones.. never know when the skills will come in handy.

    I am a leftie and so is DH. I don't understand how DH can write with the hookhand drives me nuts to watch him and his writing is unreadable. I learned to turn my paper to the right and hold my writing utensil under the line so not the smear my writing. That way I could also see what I was writing. I also do a print-write thing I usually print the letters that go under the lines and capital letters.
    Friend of bar .ka


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  11. #31
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    IF Jr. can barely write in cursive thanks to a learning disability he has. He's perfectly intelligent and doing well in college, but he is fortunate that he has other tools, like computers, which allow him to adapt to the demands of his environment.

    I am of the age where we were taught cursive. I am also of the age where I took typing class (on the big MANUAL Underwoods) in high school. Those were the days when girls could be secretaries, nurses or teachers. I didn't want to be any of those things, but I knew typing would help me in college. I have to admit it has been one of the most useful skills I have ever acquired.

    Things change over time. It used to be that humans made paintings in caves, made pictograms of wax tablets, and wrote abbreviated Latin on great rolls of hides. The need for cursive writing likely is diminishing. I don't see it as good or bad, just part of the evolution of man.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Dec. 19, 2009
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    Kids in my district still learn cursive, and I'm glad because I think they should. What makes me insane is that unless my students have been taught at home, they CAN NOT READ A CLOCK WITH HANDS. Oddly, every clock in the school is an analog clock. Is it a conspiracy by the administration, so that kids don't watch the clock waiting for the bell to ring? I don't know, but I would think by 9th grade a kid could read a clock. I keep saying I am going to take a day and teach them how to read the clock, but in this day of high stakes testing I will have to wait until after the big test in May, lest I cause my school to fall short of their AYP. If you ask me, a kid should be able to read a clock more than differentiate between a hydrolysis and a dehydration synthesis reaction, don't you think?


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  13. #33
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    The funny thing about analog clocks is that many of them don't have the numbers on them these days. Apparently, it's considered more stylish to forego them.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  14. #34
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    Sep. 27, 2001
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    Kids should be able to read and write, tell time, make change, add, subtract, multiply, and divide without a calculator, and SPELL. I find it offensive that spelling has been dropped from the curriculum in some schools - I can't read text speak and I sure don't speak it. How are you going to communicate in life if you can't write or spell correctly? I'm appalled at some of the papers I've graded. College students who can't write a 10 page research paper?! I did that in 7th and 8th grades. The education system has been dropped to the lowest common denominator to the detriment of all the other students. I fear for the future of our country if this is the education we are giving them.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    I'm on the fence with cursive. Most adults, even those of us who learned it, have our own "modified" writing style that incorporates print and cursive for ease of writing. There's a name for that, but it escapes me at the moment. Example: If I'm going to write the words "thank you", I start with a regular lower case t, but as I cross my t, I loop up to make a semi-cursive h. Then I drop, do a cursive a into my n and to the first line of my k. The y in you is cursive into the o, drop and make a u with a bit of curly tail.

    (does that make ANY sense?)

    Anyway, a bigger priority to me would be an emphasis on legible, neat writing and SPELLING. I would think that by freshman year of HS, my SD should be able to write legibly and be able to spell basic words. But the emphasis in our school district is on content. Even when they turn in papers done on the computer (where spell check is available) it is considered acceptable to write "u" instead of you, "thot" instead of thought, etc--chat speak.

    My husband makes the argument that language evolves and that eventually, all of the extra consonants and vowel combinations will go away.

    My argument is that I see these kids their freshman year of college after going through a similar education and their papers AREN'T graded that way. They are required to use appropriate capitalization, punctuation and spelling. They struggle. Further, many don't have very good application skills. They are great at facts, but not good at higher order thinking.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Dec. 11, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    The funny thing about analog clocks is that many of them don't have the numbers on them these days. Apparently, it's considered more stylish to forego them.
    Back in 1986, I bought a pair of Swatches that were of the cool, new, no-hands style. I had no problem telling the exact time down to the minute.

    I also grew up reading Roman numerals on our family cuckoo clock. I just get lost after about L or so
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.



  17. #37
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    I don't see why we should waste precious school time teaching this archaic skill when there are so many other important things to teach kids these days. Who writes anything by hand these days? I might print out a few words on a grocery list or something, but that's it, all the rest is keyboarded.
    Even back in the dark ages when I went to school, the ONLY time I ever wrote in cursive was when being taught it- after that, all the teachers wanted everything either typed or neatly printed, because they couldn't read anyone's cursive writing.
    If they want to teach it, they should offer it as an elective to older kids- older kids with a better grasp of hand coordination and writing in general could probably pick it up in a week or so vs. the prolonged practice many younger kids have to put in.


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  18. #38
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    Dec. 11, 2005
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    I use a sign-out sheet for attendance in the college classes I teach. Students are to put their signature, not print, next to their name on the sheet. I have had some students in the past couple of years tell me they don't know how to write their own signature. When I have them do short handwritten assignments in class, much of their handwriting, whether cursive or printing, is nearly illegible. I've seen printing by some 18 year old students that looks like that of a struggling first grader.

    Cursive writing allows students to more effectively take notes in class, not that too many students seem to bother to do that anymore. In fact, I had a few students this past semester whose method of note taking was to take a picture of the Power Point slides with their phones, never mind that my Power Points only consist of headings and charts from the textbook they were not bothering to read. The students who I know for sure were using this method instead of writing notes in class failed the class. *sigh*



  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    When I started school, the first two grades I was left handed.
    We had wooden led pencils, inkwells, "feathers" and blotters to write with.
    Then the new third grade teacher made all write right handed.

    Several of us had to spend almost a whole year staying after school learning to write clearly again, with the right hand.

    I think it is sensible to teach kids hand writing, but not make it an impossible, terribly hard task for so many that just can't be that good at it.
    As someone who was changed, it's horrible to have to relearn how to hold a pencil or crayon. I got fingers rapped for using the wrong hand and never did learn to write or even print neatly. My teacher for the first two years was ecstatic when I broke my left arm in grade 2 - she almost did cartwheels across the room. After many months in a cast, the new habit was ingrained.

    They still should be teaching cursive writing in schools. Regardless how much they try, elimination of pen and paper will be almost impossible - one does have to sign things, initial things and make notes at times.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

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  20. #40
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    I still write letters and all my checks out in cursive, and have been cultivating my "copperplate engraver's script" calligraphy for over 30 years. It just feels good doing it.

    If so many kids struggle with cursive in the younger grades, perhaps it could be taught in 8th or 9th grade when coordination is less of an issue. I also agree that teachers should not be obnoxiously demanding of perfection; it is an artistic skill, one that does not appeal to everyone.

    I DO think, strongly, that we need to still teach non-digital skills of communication, math etc. There are situations and places where the widgets may not operate, the prolonged power failures we seem to have every 15 days for instance, and people need to be able to function without becoming helpless.

    While I understand curriculum pressures, I also think there is a trend toward eliminating individuality in every way possible. We are moving toward a "hive mind" society very rapidly now. Twitter will never replace quiet contemplation and thoughtful writing.

    BTW, what's up with people who can't use capitals or punctuation in an e-mail? Are they illiterate, lazy, or using some phone-thing that can't do it? Drives me nuts!


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