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  1. #1
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    Default Should cursive writing be eliminated?

    A lot of schools are phasing it out and teaching kids more keyboard skills at a younger age. I personally think that it should stay in the curriculum. I agree that the keyboard skills are important, but certainly are something that most kids are exposed to at home even before it is taught at school. Cursive at home? Not so much, and I think it holds an important place to create unique signatures and to read old documents.


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  2. #2
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    I think kids should have to learn it. Mine are.

    Then again my hands are so arthritic I cannot legibly write in cursive so how hypocritical is that?!!
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    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


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  3. #3
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    handwriting/penmanship in general, cursive in particular.

    I suppose it's similar to 'German cursive' my mom had still learned in school...
    I have taught mysel how to write it, but it's a b.....to read!

    I have heard more than one kid say 'I can't read cursive'
    sad state of affairs.

    it's akin to calligraphy...cheap way of being artistic.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


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  4. #4
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    It is a fine motor skill if nothing else so yes, it should still be part of the standards.
    Telling time and counting money should be also but I can tell you as a middle school teacher that there are many that are not teaching those skills in the earlier grades.


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  5. #5
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    I think it's out of most curriculums. You make a good point--how does someone sign their name, now?

    They need to type, but they need to learn basics. I see so many kids that make "letters" not even close to what they are supposed to be, like S's that are lying flat. How will they read handwritten documents if they haven't been taught?


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    I think it's out of most curriculums. You make a good point--how does someone sign their name, now?

    They need to type, but they need to learn basics. I see so many kids that make "letters" not even close to what they are supposed to be, like S's that are lying flat. How will they read handwritten documents if they haven't been taught?
    I think of all the historical documents that were recorded in cursive. 75 years from now, will the average person be able to look at them and know what they say or will this require and interpreter?


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  7. #7
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    Default

    When I started school, the first two grades I was left handed.
    We had wooden led pencils, inkwells, "feathers" and blotters to write with.
    Then the new third grade teacher made all write right handed.

    Several of us had to spend almost a whole year staying after school learning to write clearly again, with the right hand.

    I think it is sensible to teach kids hand writing, but not make it an impossible, terribly hard task for so many that just can't be that good at it.


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  8. #8
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    Wasn't cursive desgned to be a more rapid way to hand write messages? Not lifting the pen from the paper and all that? Me I think it still has a place, even if it's just to be gracious and polite.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    When I started school, the first two grades I was left handed.
    We had wooden led pencils, inkwells and feathers to write with.
    Then the new teacher made all write right handed.

    Several of us had to spend almost a whole year staying after school learning to write clearly again, with the right hand.

    I think it is sensible to teach kids hand writing, but not make it an impossible, terribly hard task for so many that just can't be that good at it.
    Oh my....retraining....
    I am glad we have moved away from that!
    (I had a friend in school she could equally well write with both hands. I mean WELL!)

    but they should be able to draw legible squiggles with their dominant hand.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  10. #10
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    Yep. I just finished the Declaration of Independence and Constitution--all cursive. But, you can find it all typed online now.

    I asked a group of elementary teachers about how kids write because it's not something I deal with. I have some kids that write bizarrely--left handed, write from the top of the page almost upside down. It's weird how they pick it up. I was told if you really don't train them to hold the pencil correctly by 1st grade, there's not much you can do, unless of course you do the old-fashioned methods used with poor lefties.


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  11. #11
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    Yes, I think cursive writing still has a place. My own kids have commented that there is a special relationship between the writer and the written piece when it's done by hand . . . while I mostly write on my computer now, I still have that feeling that when you write, especially write in cursive, you are more involved with the message.

    This is actually supported by research that shows the physical action of forming letters while writing by hand activates different parts of the brain than typing and can help people learn. Of course this would work with printed writing as well.

    While I think keyboard skills are important to learn, I think that kids are missing out on that special relationship with words when they don't write by hand.

    On a side note, I collect vintage postcards and one of the things that truly stands out is how beautiful handwriting was in the early 1900s. It's a shame that we've lost that skill.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    Yep. I just finished the Declaration of Independence and Constitution--all cursive. But, you can find it all typed online now.

    I asked a group of elementary teachers about how kids write because it's not something I deal with. I have some kids that write bizarrely--left handed, write from the top of the page almost upside down. It's weird how they pick it up. I was told if you really don't train them to hold the pencil correctly by 1st grade, there's not much you can do, unless of course you do the old-fashioned methods used with poor lefties.

    I shudder...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


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  13. #13
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    God only knows the stuff kids are gonna be taught at the lowest levels five years from now...
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    God only knows the stuff kids are gonna be taught at the lowest levels five years from now...
    and he is crying already
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


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  15. #15
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    I always write my checks out in cursive


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  16. #16
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    I have become involved in the union, shudder (best to be in the middle of the enemy) to see what is going on. And, with that ended up at a school board meeting where they wanted to find out why our test scores are flattening out.

    Superintendent and district office personnel give this looooooong report on this great new "program" we have (which I got my 3 minutes on before they started, explaining how it's seriously lacking) that is SO great because it will meet the new common core standards that will be for pretty much all the US. It teaches teachers how to "do more than have kids memorize random facts, but think and explain."

    WHAT??? Are you kidding? There are teachers who AREN'T teaching higher level thinking as a matter of course? If there are, why the hell aren't they in there and doing something about it? So, we spend ALL of this time (or are supposed to, not me) teaching these AMAZING strategies like questioning and explaining what you mean instead of multiple choice answers. In the meantime, the kids aren't actually writing, doing math, practicing, proving they're reading, etc. I five years kids will be able to explain what they mean verbally, usually, but not write it in a correct sentence or actually produce something with that knowledge.



  17. #17
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    I pulled my kids out of public school when my son was in 3rd grade and being flogged into writing cursive. If he let a letter fall below the line in answering a test question the question was marked wrong. Pages upon pages of practice on each letter, omg it was nutty. When I brought him home I told him as long as I can read it you're fine-he was what... 9 years old? So he wrote as best he could and he wrote amazing stuff.

    Couple years into homeschooling he decided he wanted to write in cursive and taught himself in about a week. He now, at 15 in public school again, writes in gloriously old-fashioned tall cursive and gets compliments all the time on it. LOL
    Last edited by cowboymom; Dec. 25, 2012 at 08:57 PM. Reason: silly typo


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  18. #18
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    Wait a minute - they aren't teaching cursive writing anymore?!

    I write almost exclusively in cursive. It is so much faster and at least with me, it looks better. That's so weird to me today's kids won't know how to do it. What if I wind up with grandkids someday, they aren't going to be able to read my cards!!
    *Wendy* 4.17.73 - 12.20.05



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    I pulled my kids out of public school when my son was in 3rd grade and being flogged into writing cursive. If he let a letter fall below the line in answering a test question the question was marked wrong. Pages upon pages of practice on each letter, omg it was nutty. When I brought him home I told him as long as I can read it you're fine-he was what... 9 years old? So he wrote as best he could and he wrote amazing stuff.

    Couple years into homeschooling he decided he wanted to write in cursive and taught himself in about a week. He now, at 15 in public school again, writes in gloriously old-fashioned tall cursive and gets compliments all the time on it. LOL
    The hand/eye coordination for writing is not always there in the early grades, so many struggle with that.
    For me, that was combined with being strongly astigmatic and not getting glasses until I was older, so all was sort of blurry in the pages anyway.

    While teachers notice much, there is also so much they miss.


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  20. #20
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    I think it should still be taught, such that kids are able to read it (and write it- at least somewhat.)
    I personally hated writing in cursive, but I don't print either, I do this odd mix of print/cursive/capital/small letters. Although I am capable of either printing or writing neatly if I have reason to.

    So I think it should be taught, but doesn't necessarily need to be, for lack of a better word, "overdone." Let them use the computer or print if something needs to be hand written, as so much IS done electronically now, but the ability to read cursive has its place.



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