The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 10 of 26 FirstFirst ... 8910111220 ... LastLast
Results 181 to 200 of 503
  1. #181
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    What an amazingly good discussion. Thank you guys.

    Calena, thank you so much for that definition of faith. I struggled for many years with that word, because to me it was defined as "believing just because". In truth, I believe in lots of things...if I didn't, I'd be a mess. For instance, I believe that it will likely be tomorrow after I go to bed at night...I believe that when I squeeze the tube of toothpaste it will come out in a glob...

    Faith in God has been harder as I did not grow up in a tradition.

    LMH, I have only listened to the first of that series you posted but the idea of being a follower of Jesus sits very well with me. I struggle with the concept of a supreme being pulling all kinds of puppet strings, but Jesus was an amazing leader and person no matter his divinity.

    Bluey, I would disagree that the precepts are ingrained into our society. I thought so too, but they aren't. If they were, we wouldn't have lawyers who defend our rights. There would be no argument about taxes. There would be no war. What is very interesting is that what Jesus was advocating was not at all what outsiders currently see of Christianity.

    It was also incredibly different than the culture at that time.

    Incidentally, I grew up in an atheist/agnostic household and one might call me marginally Episcopalian. Faith has always been this sort of little thing in my peripheral vision that I keep trying to taste but struggle with.

    I have heard many arguments against Christianity, but I have to say, following Jesus...well, if we all lived as he did it *would* be heaven on earth. For a secular view of many of the same concepts, try Arbinger.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #182
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    11,808

    Default

    The Term "Christian" is used when sometimes that has nothing to do with a person having accepted Christ as their Savior.
    Yes "Christians" have done some heinous things through the centuries.
    I do not call myself a Christian, I do not call myself anything. To me what is in ones heart is between The Lord and themselves! Just my take.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  3. #183
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,978

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OneGrayPony View Post
    What an amazingly good discussion. Thank you guys.

    Calena, thank you so much for that definition of faith. I struggled for many years with that word, because to me it was defined as "believing just because". In truth, I believe in lots of things...if I didn't, I'd be a mess. For instance, I believe that it will likely be tomorrow after I go to bed at night...I believe that when I squeeze the tube of toothpaste it will come out in a glob...

    Faith in God has been harder as I did not grow up in a tradition.

    LMH, I have only listened to the first of that series you posted but the idea of being a follower of Jesus sits very well with me. I struggle with the concept of a supreme being pulling all kinds of puppet strings, but Jesus was an amazing leader and person no matter his divinity.

    Bluey, I would disagree that the precepts are ingrained into our society. I thought so too, but they aren't. If they were, we wouldn't have lawyers who defend our rights. There would be no argument about taxes. There would be no war. What is very interesting is that what Jesus was advocating was not at all what outsiders currently see of Christianity.

    It was also incredibly different than the culture at that time.

    Incidentally, I grew up in an atheist/agnostic household and one might call me marginally Episcopalian. Faith has always been this sort of little thing in my peripheral vision that I keep trying to taste but struggle with.

    I have heard many arguments against Christianity, but I have to say, following Jesus...well, if we all lived as he did it *would* be heaven on earth. For a secular view of many of the same concepts, try Arbinger.
    I will refer you to the neurobiology studies that show a very specific difference in brains of those that say they are deeply religious and those that can't see what all the fuss is about religions.

    A local pillar of one of our churches told me once, now an old man, that he struggled all his life, praying that he would feel what faith is offering to so many believers, but all just left him cold.

    Once I explained that brain wiring difference to him and that didn't mean something was wrong with him or religion, he should come to it from thinking about it, not wanting to have a deep, emotional response to belief as so many seem to, he later told me he was at peace now.

    Yes, you can come to being one of the faithful thru other paths than so many have evolved to feel emotionally the kind of religious certainty and even rapture that makes them part of the faithful.
    In certain societies, that also is an advantage, but it seems less and less necessary today, to still be part of the more secular societies many of us live in.

    All you have to do to see the difference is to look at some still very religious moslem countries and how religion is still guiding their very restrictive societies, or trying to, along with fighting each other for the "right" brand of religion.

    That is how the christian world was for centuries also, except there were less people around then.
    That is a world the first americans left behind, trying to change that and why we are where we are today.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #184
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    Yes, I understand that, Bluey.

    But I'm not even talking about faith in any type of invisible being. I had been struggling with the word itself, and I was grateful for that explanation.

    What I was talking about was - strip away all the mystical stuff if you like. Pull all of that away and what do you have? You have a pretty amazing leader, who taught you to give away all of your possessions, turn the other cheek, and to love one another. Loving isn't something you feel, it's something you do.

    Following Jesus, again, regardless of the mystical pieces, is something that could still be transformative of the world today. And I have to wonder how much all of those mystical pieces even matter, or whether they mean other things than we commonly accept them to mean.

    Let me see if I can give a good example of what I mean. I do the dishes a lot at my house, probably disproportionately so. I can do the dishes in two ways...I can do them with a focus on me, which makes me rather crabby and I feel "put upon"...or, I can do the dishes with a focus on my family, my husband, etc and when I put the focus on them (eg love) I feel joyful and at peace. Regardless of the rightness or wrongness of me doing the bulk of the dishes, the simple act of loving my family changed the nature of how I felt.

    So true, one can love like that without Jesus. But Jesus called for everyone to love *everybody* like that.

    What would it mean to love the Muslims like that?

    What would it mean to love our gay brothers and sisters like that?

    What would it mean to love total strangers on the street like that?

    And then I come to the question - does all of that other stuff matter? I'm not sure if it really does (at this point).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #185
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    Oh - and the point I'm trying to make (albeit poorly) is that I'm not so sure that you can look at followers of those religions and discount the source material itself.

    That would be like discounting all of science because the newspapers report on it poorly (which they do).

    Keep in mind, I'm just musing as much as anything else. Not trying to convince anyone of anything - just examining a different side of things than I had ever considered myself.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #186
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,978

    Default

    There was recently an article in Psychology Today that explained how the writer understood what Jesus meant when relating to others.
    Makes for interesting reading:

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/...ution-bullying



  7. #187
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    Yes...that is a much more well written way of saying what I was trying to say.

    I do think jargon also gets in the way. When I think of the concept of evil being this sort of mystical badness, I struggle. But when I think of things that are against those precepts that Jesus taught, such as selfishness, greed, hatred etc, and sort of sum those up as evil...well then I do believe in that.

    When I hear "I'm a sinner and all have fallen short" that sounds really depressing. But I can believe myself to be a perfectly good human being (as human beings go) while still realizing that compared to what Jesus describes, well I'm just not there.

    When I was studying the Arbinger material my teacher admitted that he, too, struggled with the concepts and that he would always struggle with it, wrestle with it, and be less than perfect with it. It's very similar, in my mind.

    I'm still struggling with the concepts of grace and divinity, but right now I can think that those would be helpful ways of understanding that you are not going to be perfect at this...that following Jesus's way is hard, and that's okay, and to be expected. Hmmm...



  8. #188
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,344

    Default

    I'm all caught up! I have to admit, I'm rather shocked but definitely pleased to see this discussion has continued in fairly diplomatic and respectful vein. That's uncommon when discussing religion. Sadly.

    One thing I picked up on earlier was the concept of people feeling "called" to duty via (in the examples I recall) God.

    I have felt called to act. Called with a sense of duty. Could it be that my feeling of calling isn't really any different than the feeling someone of faith has?

    There are some things that I kind of "believe in" and try to "live by" that I don't know the origin of, they just popped into my head and have been a part of me for a long time. For example, and this is a really small thing, I try to make 3 people smile every day. Preferably strangers. It's a little exercise that I've been doing for years. I remember where it started though. I saw someone in a grocery store who seemed very weighed down with worry or maybe she was just distracted. But she was in the line next to me and and I felt compelled to engage her. I don't know where that feeling came from, but it was there. So I complimented her earrings. I know. Lame. But her eyes brightened and she told me the story of how she acquired them. Gave me her number. And we are still friends 10 years later! It turned out that she had just broken up with a boyfriend and he had moved out. She was buying her first batch of groceries living alone and was sad. Was that God? Or just being sensitive to someone maybe "needing" a lift?

    I can give lots of other examples and while I'm not curing AIDS or anything, I get a tremendous sense of fulfillment when I feel like I've made someone's day just a little brighter.

    I dunno. I think that whatever works to get people working harder to do good in the world is great. But I *personally* don't feel that it's God guiding me.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #189
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    720

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OneGrayPony View Post
    I'm still struggling with the concepts of grace and divinity, but right now I can think that those would be helpful ways of understanding that you are not going to be perfect at this...that following Jesus's way is hard, and that's okay, and to be expected. Hmmm...
    Maybe I can help define what Biblical grace is, since I also struggled to comprehend this one for years. Grace simply means a gift given that wasn't earned or deserved. In the Biblical sense, the term grace goes to the extreme in that a gift is given to someone who is a known enemy. And the gift is the ultimate gift, in that Christ literally was willing to die to save his enemies!

    While an extremely brave and admirable person (police, firefighters, armed forces) might be willing to give up their life to save their neighbors, friends and family, who is willing to die to save an active enemy? Certainly that enemy did not deserve or earn that sacrifice. But it was given. This is my understanding of what the Christian church means when we say we are saved by grace. Amazing grace!
    <><




  10. #190
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    BR, I know what you mean.
    You dont need a "middle man" to know what to do, or how to be.

    both my kids are currently agnostic. We have talked a lot about peoples belief systems and religions. They have both opted out, citing that they dont see a need for the middle man.

    It is interesting to be raising children in the south without even a loose religious affiliation. "do you believe in god" and "where do you go to church" are questions that first graders have been taught to ask the other children. My son learned pretty quickly to side step the questions but LMEqT has a stubborn streak in her and loves to debate them. Her favorite myth to debunk is "there is a man in the ceiling (god) watching you so you had better be good or you will go to hell". She says they have been brainwashed and its good for them to have to practice critical thinking LOL
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #191
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,978

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    BR, I know what you mean.
    You dont need a "middle man" to know what to do, or how to be.

    both my kids are currently agnostic. We have talked a lot about peoples belief systems and religions. They have both opted out, citing that they dont see a need for the middle man.

    It is interesting to be raising children in the south without even a loose religious affiliation. "do you believe in god" and "where do you go to church" are questions that first graders have been taught to ask the other children. My son learned pretty quickly to side step the questions but LMEqT has a stubborn streak in her and loves to debate them. Her favorite myth to debunk is "there is a man in the ceiling (god) watching you so you had better be good or you will go to hell". She says they have been brainwashed and its good for them to have to practice critical thinking LOL
    I don't know, maybe it is not right to try to explain to others that some of us, that don't see the bright rainbow of colors faith is for them, may think all that is irrelevant after all?

    I think people of each faith have the same rights to seeing the world their way as everyone else of other faiths or none.
    I would never try to have the faithful see the world as I see it, just as I expect for them to respect that I also have my own reality.

    The trouble is when we come to specifics and either side wants to make the whole world according to their own vision, without considering alternate ones.

    I see that reflected with some here that really would want to, say, have abortion or gay marriage be up to the individual, not have the state decide what is right, but their Sunday sermon keeps telling them they have to vote against that, so the reluctantly do.
    That to me is a bit dishonest, even if I see where their conflict comes from.
    To me, that is the part of faith I don't like, when it is abused to impinge into other's lives, to control others.



  12. #192
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    16,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    It is interesting to be raising children in the south without even a loose religious affiliation. "do you believe in god" and "where do you go to church" are questions that first graders have been taught to ask the other children. My son learned pretty quickly to side step the questions but LMEqT has a stubborn streak in her and loves to debate them. Her favorite myth to debunk is "there is a man in the ceiling (god) watching you so you had better be good or you will go to hell". She says they have been brainwashed and its good for them to have to practice critical thinking LOL
    LOL, she sounds like my kind of girl.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  13. #193
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Her favorite myth to debunk is "there is a man in the ceiling (god) watching you so you had better be good or you will go to hell". She says they have been brainwashed and its good for them to have to practice critical thinking LOL
    Well that certainly isn't offensive to those of us that do not consider it a myth and are politely trying to respond to questions.


    No one has screamed fire and brimstone or fires of hell on this thread. I think the responses from believers have been extremely polite with none coming across to me as trying to be demeaning of offensive.

    I must admit, however, that comments as this one...or when you and other atheists trying to speak for 'believers' (they believe because they need a crutch, it is a myth because you don't need a middleman, they believe because the are not strong, whatever)...well those posts are becoming increasingly difficult to ignore.

    You are an atheist...so are several others on this thread. I think we all get that now. Why not speak from that position and leave out comments that are without question intended to demean?

    Not to mention calling God a man in the ceiling, while cute and clever and sure to get chuckles from fellow atheists, shows a complete lack of understanding of anything in the Bible while again appearing to be superior to the 'weak Christians' needing a crutch. It is also incredibly disrespectful.

    I appreciate input from those of any faith or lack of faith but would appreciate it the comments could be made with a little less arrogance and ignorance.

    It just seems those that actually believe would be better equipped to answer the questions surrounding belief rather than non-believers trying to speak for us as if we are not in the room.

    An example...
    I have several friends that are very devout Jews. I go out of my way to be respectful when discussing differences in our beliefs. Why is it so difficult for some that are atheists to do the same to Christians?

    In other words, rather than saying it is a myth why not just say you do not believe? Why couch your statement in a way that is certain to create a defensive response?

    Calling faith in God a myth is no less offensive than me saying you are going to hell because you are 'wrong.'

    I have held back saying anything for several pages because the thread has not been a total train wreck...but at some point it seems fair and reasonable to request a little more consideration in responses.

    I have tried to make this request politely and hope it will be received in that manner.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #194
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I don't know, maybe it is not right to try to explain to others that some of us, that don't see the bright rainbow of colors faith is for them, may think all that is irrelevant after all?

    I think people of each faith have the same rights to seeing the world their way as everyone else of other faiths or none.
    I would never try to have the faithful see the world as I see it, just as I expect for them to respect that I also have my own reality.

    The trouble is when we come to specifics and either side wants to make the whole world according to their own vision, without considering alternate ones.

    I see that reflected with some here that really would want to, say, have abortion or gay marriage be up to the individual, not have the state decide what is right, but their Sunday sermon keeps telling them they have to vote against that, so the reluctantly do.
    That to me is a bit dishonest, even if I see where their conflict comes from.
    To me, that is the part of faith I don't like, when it is abused to impinge into other's lives, to control others.
    Oh I think she is tolerant of their beliefs, what I left out was the amount of harrassment she gets because she does not believe in god. What she debates is the silly crap, like there is a man in the ceiling.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #195
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,344

    Default

    I remember the exact moment when I tossed out religion.

    I was only 9.

    Up til that point, I went to church every Sunday with various friends (if you spent the night, you went to church the next morning!) I didn't grow up in a religious home, but I went to bible school in the summer, memorized passages, read through the whole bible I "won" during bible study the year before, etc. I was into it.

    And then we went to a new church my Dad wanted to try. I was in bible school that morning...again, just 9 years old. And I DESPERATELY wanted to impress my new Sunday School teacher. (I was an overachiever)

    So when she asked during our lesson how clam shells ended up on top of mountains, I knew I was good to go so I raised my hand tall as I could.

    At that time in my life, I wanted to either be a paleontologist or a veterinarian. I had been to Dinosaur National Monument. I loved studying about fossils, etc.

    So there I was, I had this answer IN THE BAG!

    And she CALLED on me!

    So I explained about how when animals died, they went to the sea floor or became stuck in mud and fossilized and then due to movement of tectonic plates, these fossils that would've been on the sea floor, end up at the tops of mountains.

    Grinning as I finished, I was absolutely shocked and crestfallen when she said, "No, you're wrong. Dead things float and during the Great Flood, these things floated to the tops of mountains."

    At that point, I was done.

    I still pursued learning about religion--mostly in college because I wanted to be a physician and knew that lots of people have religious beliefs that affect their medical choices so I wanted to understand. But I never really got over the fact that with science so blatantly there with an explanation, someone was going to resort to The Flood as an answer.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #196
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    LMH, read it again... There is no man in the ceiling! There isnt! Seriously, its that simple.. No man in the ceiling. Its literal, not figurative LOL

    We are talking about a nine year old, who has had a reasonable amount of exposure to religion, and the concepts of god and morals and ethics. She thinks its fine for them to believe in god, she thinks its nuts that they think god is a man in the ceiling, watching them, and thats why they should be good.

    Seriously .. Children are very literal. For her, the jury is out on god but what she knows for sure is that there is no man in the ceiling. There is a very good chance that because we discuss all sides of this issue that she has a better understanding of what they are trying to say, than they do. Whatever choices my kids make about religion will be from a position of knowledge and education, not dogma or myths.

    And FWIW no I am not an atheist, I am agnostic. Important distinction IMO.

    As far as getting upset about it.. No one is insulting or demeaning your beliefs by not agreeing with them. Its hard to discuss things that people feel passionate about. In all honesty *because* of my personal beliefs, I think its great that you and others find what you need in organized religion. I have discarded it as not useful to me but I would not and have not discounted it as helpful to you or anyone else.

    But .. There is no man in the ceiling!
    Last edited by EqTrainer; Dec. 26, 2012 at 11:36 AM.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #197
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    The trouble is when we come to specifics and either side wants to make the whole world according to their own vision, without considering alternate ones.

    I see that reflected with some here that really would want to, say, have abortion or gay marriage be up to the individual, not have the state decide what is right, but their Sunday sermon keeps telling them they have to vote against that, so the reluctantly do.
    That to me is a bit dishonest, even if I see where their conflict comes from.
    To me, that is the part of faith I don't like, when it is abused to impinge into other's lives, to control others.
    I don't think that's a part of faith though...I think that's what I'm now seeing. That is a consequence of people falling short. Being weak where Jesus commanded them to be strong.

    Buddyroo, making people smile is a wonderful thing! Don't stop!

    But I do have to wonder if any of us here even would be able to do what Jesus told us to do. Would we be able to fully look out for other people's interests before our own? That model is different...almost contrary to our biological imperative of protecting our resources to perpetuate our own genes (on an individual level, I do understand that in the grand scheme of things, it's a better way of being.)

    It's rather interesting when thought about like that and I'm still not quite sure what to do with it.



  18. #198
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Buddy Roo serious question...there is no question that your teacher was not a qualified teacher...no one can argue that it is never right to be so discouraging to a student at such a young age.

    But how does the actions of one person result in someone throwing out religion?

    For example, if had a math teacher than was very difficult or rude I would not just 'give up math.'

    I am not picking on you-you just gave a great story that reflects what seems to be a common theme-many people decide they do no believe in God because of an experience with a "Christian" that behaved poorly.

    Not only is it an interesting train of thought but it also really hits home what an impact behavior makes on someone.

    I also will say some of the worst behavior I have seen has come within the church. It can be very unsettling but God is not responsible for an individual's behavior.

    EqT gave the other example-though I think it was on the other thread. EqT was it you that said you decided that God did not exist because a friend of yours committed suicide?

    That is a tragic thing to endure. I know first hand. It is emotionally scarring. But why does that mean there is no God?

    It seems like it is wanting it both ways...I hear atheists say they don't like the idea of a puppet in the sky controlling them but they get mad when humans exercise free will and choice and the result is hurtful.

    I am not debating your choices but find the reasons for the choice interesting.



  19. #199
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post

    And FWIW no I am not an atheist, I am agnostic. Important distinction IMO.
    Yes it is an important one-my apologies...

    And I know kids are kids-and I don't think there is anyone in the ceiling. He is in the clouds silly.

    Are people really teaching their kids that God is in the ceiling???


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #200
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NOVA
    Posts
    93

    Default "Why [I] look to God/Jesus"

    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    What strikes me about most religious people is they are good people and do good things, and I want to be involved with doing all of that. But what struck me about what this pastor was saying was that it's all about God and focusing on God and giving into him and how you just need to let him in to be saved and whatever. If you're that way, fine. But my thoughts kept going back to WHY do you have to keep preaching "look to God/Jesus" to save you and do right? It seems to trivialize people and what we all (most) know. We know how to care and behave and do right and be good and care. Why do we need to look to something else to do that for us? Are we that immature and unintelligent that we need something in the middle?
    The phrase "to look to someone" for help/salvation serves as a reminder to me to study the scriptures; to pray for guidance; and to follow or emulate those teaching to my best ability, which is far from perfect.

    I regard this in the same light as learning any skill. For example riding dressage. In theory, I know how to ride and ride pretty well, but I have much more to learn. My shelves are full of books I've read to further my education. I've taken lessons from a variety of trainers and clinicians and I've spent hours on the ground and in the saddle to improve my abilities.

    Learning to love and live a good life is a skill like any other.

    The central meaning of Christianity to me is love, which can be summed up with these verses from Matthew 22:

    37 Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.

    38 This is the first and great commandment.

    39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

    and John 13:34 A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another.

    For me it's all about love, which seems easy on the surface, but in practice can be much more difficult.

    Do you know what I mean? I'm not trying to start a fight or put anyone down, but it's kind of hard to ask people who truly believe this. WHY do you have to worship Jesus/God, and not just be a good person on your own? I get the community thing, but . . .
    I worship my Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ because I love them and because I'm so grateful for all that they have done for me. I know that when I apply their wisdom available in the scriptures to my life that I have greater peace, joy, love, and understanding in my life.

    I find when I take the time to include God/Jesus in my life that it's easier to be a good person. =) It helps me remember who I am and why I'm here.
    Last edited by tbaymare; Dec. 26, 2012 at 01:25 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. The Religious Folk that stop by....
    By knightrider in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 114
    Last Post: Apr. 10, 2012, 01:42 AM
  2. Can someone explain the Nook/Kindle thing to me?
    By IntegritySporthorses in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: Sep. 6, 2011, 05:18 PM
  3. WTF is wrong with these religious fanatics?
    By TheHorseProblem in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: Apr. 3, 2011, 07:48 PM
  4. What are your religious beliefs?
    By Lazy Palomino Hunter in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 91
    Last Post: Apr. 11, 2010, 02:53 AM
  5. Explain this Hunter position thing to me, please.
    By Velvet in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 130
    Last Post: Feb. 13, 2003, 08:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness