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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2008
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    UK
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    839

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    Quote Originally Posted by twotrudoc View Post
    While I am really, really appreciative of thoughts and opinions, folks please, please read the part where it says

    "I am working as a Fiscal Sup now, hoping to promote to Analyst 3 or 4 (accounting, analysis, budgets,and auditing) next winter.
    "

    And

    "Part of my reasoning is that I am getting experience now as well as previously for management (I am 41, I have managed restaurants as well as been a sup for Xerox). I will receive my Bachelors in Accounting with over two years Fiscal (accounting, analysis and auditing) experience. I have a clear path in higher ed with just the Bachelors and a CMA cert. I really want to go as big as possible and that MBA combined with my experience will get me there."

    I am not a 22 year old with no experience. I am currently managing the cashiers and accounts receivables for my employer as well as doing accounting and I spent many years as a nationally ranked top ten supervisor for a Fortune 500 providing service to another Fortune 500.

    I really, really welcome opinion and insight, especially from those who actually have an MBA, are an exec, are an accountant, or are relatively familiar with the meaning of various degrees.
    I have an MBA, albeit from the UK. I would definitely do it, but do the accountancy ones first as this will probably allow you to skip some of the mandatory elements of the MBA.

    I think your profile is ideal for an MBA - there's a really wide range of people and I think those with your type of experience tend to come out well. I did an evening MBA - I was lucky to live near to a good Business School and that route was great - and was totally not kids straight out of their BA, which may be something you want to think about. 'Exec MBAs' also - a mix of home-work and three day intensive courses.

    Good luck! and for what it's worth; I say go for it!



  2. #22
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
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    1,579

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    TwoTruDoc: You got what you asked for. I have 15 years executive experience at the C level. I have an MBA.

    Yes you have experience but here is the the reality. You have experience in clerking functions. That's good. You have some supervisory experience. That's good too. I can't speak to what it takes to managing a restaurant. If you get the Accounting degree that will give you more career options. However, it does not sound like you want to be in industry but rather teaching somewhere. That's what I take away from your post.

    If that's the case then the MBA is not terribly helpful other than giving you a graduate degree. You would be better off getting a masters in accounting and your CPA. That would provide depth of knowledge a community college would look for. The community colleges like people with professional experience in their fields. To date, based on your posts, you have not worked as an accountant. Get your your accounting degree. Get some experience as an accountant. Get your CPA and masters.
    People often confuse ideology with knowledge and thoughtful reasoning.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2002
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    NJ, USA
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    2,357

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    Quote Originally Posted by FitToBeTied View Post
    To date, based on your posts, you have not worked as an accountant. Get your your accounting degree. Get some experience as an accountant. Get your CPA and masters.
    25 years experience in Business, Controller, I agree with FTBT - I have done enough coursework for 1.5 MBA's (2 different attempts spread a decade apart) and all tuition was paid for by my employer. First attempt probably helped me get promoted quickly as they saw my studies as ambition. But after that it didn't matter, my bosses even asked why I bothered. Each time had to stop as my work requirements were too overwhelming. I may finish it one day, but just for my Mom's satisfaction, haha.

    The degree helps you crack into the business world - without a bachelors you won't even start - but having the Masters before starting a real business career wasn't a plus - in fact at times a negative, as those we've tried to hire with that background seemed to think too much of themselves to learn how we wanted things done to even begin to be a part of the team. They wanted to change things thanks to their big education, and that just bred resentment. They either were not hired or sent packing shortly after hiring.

    Once you have a job in business admin/accounting, a lot is political - learning how to get along with & work with people without alienating anyone or making anyone feel threatened. You gain respect by showing a good work ethic & being willing to take on any project & doing your best to get it done. Along that road if you acquire advanced degree(s) it can help polish your image & help nudge promotions & raises, but it's not critical, not from the business side of things.

    If I could do it again I would have used the youthful energy to get the CPA, that would have served me better in the long run.

    Good luck whatever you decide, you seem to have a lot of energy & momentum & that is always an asset!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2011
    Location
    WNC
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    935

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    I have an MBA from SMU's Executive MBA program, completely paid for by my employer. Program was 2 years, every other Friday-Saturday all day, plus lots of study-group get-togethers in between. It's a nice way to go and shows the employer's commitment to you so that's a benefit as well (also helps if you're later looking at different employers; they can see you were considered a worthy investment).

    The one thing I would say, no matter how or when you get your MBA, is to take Business Communications classes at the same time, possibly get a minor if available. That was the most desired combination of studies according to top employers: the ability not just to do the number and understand them but to be able to clearly do presentations /papers for people who don't have your numbers background. Those two things can help you get up the executive ladder and set you apart from the people who are strictly numbers-focused.
    It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
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    10,140

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    Quote Originally Posted by FitToBeTied View Post
    TwoTruDoc: You got what you asked for. I have 15 years executive experience at the C level. I have an MBA.

    Yes you have experience but here is the the reality. You have experience in clerking functions. That's good. You have some supervisory experience. That's good too. I can't speak to what it takes to managing a restaurant. If you get the Accounting degree that will give you more career options. However, it does not sound like you want to be in industry but rather teaching somewhere. That's what I take away from your post.

    If that's the case then the MBA is not terribly helpful other than giving you a graduate degree. You would be better off getting a masters in accounting and your CPA. That would provide depth of knowledge a community college would look for. The community colleges like people with professional experience in their fields. To date, based on your posts, you have not worked as an accountant. Get your your accounting degree. Get some experience as an accountant. Get your CPA and masters.



    "You have experience in clerking functions." "To date, based on your posts, you have not worked as an accountant. Get your your accounting degree." My current job description is accounting with supervisory functions. We have an operating budget of over 10 million. I have stated very clearly in my posts that I am a junior, that means I am in my 3rd year of attaining my Bachelor's in Accounting.

    "You have some supervisory experience." I have over 15 years supervisory experience with proven (read bottom line and employee retention) results. My last two years with Xerox, as one of their most productive (again, read bottom line) supervisors.

    "Get your CPA and masters." As previously posted many, many times, I am getting my CMA and am already a student member of IMA.

    "However, it does not sound like you want to be in industry but rather teaching somewhere. That's what I take away from your post." I have also posted many times that I would like the ability to teach part time or even teach in retirement and that a Masters would enable me to do so. One of the folks I look up to and is a mentor to me is the CFO of one of the areas biggest and very well known corporations, she teaches accounting part time and is currently finishing her doctorate in accounting so she can teach online through her retirement while traveling globally with her husband.


    "TwoTruDoc: You got what you asked for. I have 15 years executive experience at the C level. I have an MBA." I would highly suggest you go back and retake any leadership or communication classes Also, the rude tone is not appreciated and, in my experience, most folks at the corporate or executive level know how to communicate in an effective and professional manner. I do realize this is a forum and we all let our hair down but I am not impressed with your dismissive know it all way of writing or the fact that you do not communicate in a professional manner when stating that you are a professional. I am not trying to be rude myself but this calls for frank and direct communication style.

    Have a nice day, FTBT

    Everyone else, I do appreciate your feedbackand especially those who took the time to PM me with insight and experiences of your own. I can definitely appreciate a differing viewpoint but I am reading posts that do not even seem to have read the main post LOL!! So, I apologize if I sound frustrated but I am sure you can understand why being told to get a Bachelor's in Accounting would be annoying when I am, in fact, more than halfway through one LOL!!
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
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    10,140

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    Quote Originally Posted by GotMyPony View Post
    I have an MBA from SMU's Executive MBA program, completely paid for by my employer. Program was 2 years, every other Friday-Saturday all day, plus lots of study-group get-togethers in between. It's a nice way to go and shows the employer's commitment to you so that's a benefit as well (also helps if you're later looking at different employers; they can see you were considered a worthy investment).

    The one thing I would say, no matter how or when you get your MBA, is to take Business Communications classes at the same time, possibly get a minor if available. That was the most desired combination of studies according to top employers: the ability not just to do the number and understand them but to be able to clearly do presentations /papers for people who don't have your numbers background. Those two things can help you get up the executive ladder and set you apart from the people who are strictly numbers-focused.

    I agree, and I have been awesomely taken care of enough to have been sent through those classes but in the private industry. Communication style, the ability to get your message across, is what is key

    Thanks for your advice!
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,985

    Default Have you asked your boss or human resources?

    They would know you, your skills, and which type of degree would have the most value for you in that organization, and in the industry in general.

    Easy to do a basic calculation on the payback period-- how many years will it take for you to recover the $30k investment via expected salary increases (compared to the standard merit increases that xerox has been giving you on your current salary)?

    At 41 and just getting your BA, there's no way around the fact that you are starting the path to CFO later than most. Within a large, highly-structured company like Xerox, there is probably a fairly clearly defined progression up through the levels. About how many positions will you need to "pass through", to get from where you are now to CFO? Assuming you need to spend a couple of years in each of those positions, does the timeline mesh with your goal of a somewhat early retirement (to pursue teaching)? Probably you can get to CFO sooner at a smaller company, but there again, take into account the lower salary that likely entails, and calc whether the payback is really there.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    10,140

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    Okay, I give! I give up LOL!! Does no one read anymore!!??? I am sorry, Hungarian, but really?? You can't be serious?

    I no longer work at Xerox. I work in accounting, in a role called "Fiscal Supervisor" at a community college. It is the equivalent of a Fiscal Analyst 2 or 3 for accounting except with more supervisory duties (a 3 is a lead and does not supervise), I manage the cashiers and receivables people as well as my own job. I will be looking to promote to a Fiscal Analyst 3 or most likely 4 by fall 2013.

    Who said anything about early retirement???

    Who said anything about joining the Fiscal team at Xerox??

    I have already done the calculations and forecast expense for all scenarios from no scholarships/grants to receiving the ones I applied for/am going to apply for. I will also add that my current salary would support the payment on that amount of debt with the current interest rate for an unsubsidized Stafford Loan.

    My boss (who was just promoted to Director of Finance last week) feels that I would make an exceptional CFO or Director. That is why she hired me HR also likes that not only am I solid in the sup skills, I also have the latest in training for people and soft skills which has proven to be a boon for staff, college, and union disputes. I am currently highly ranked in my class at college (my school is one of the top 3 online accounting programs) as well.

    Trust me, this isn't a whim I rarely do anything that requires this much investment on a whim. Actually, I do nothing like this on a whim.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,985

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    Holy cow. I outlined the logic I'd follow if this were me-- will the 30k investment pay for itself and result in the specific goal you laid out? Nothing in my post suggested this were a whim or that you are not capable or qualified. And yes, I committed the unforgivable error of missing the phrase "that I currently work for" buried somewhere at the bottom of the page, in one of several posts.
    I mentioned early retirement in the context of the CFO role, because you said want to get to CFO with enough time to then start a new career teaching, and then at 65 start travelling the world.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2002
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    2,357

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    If your current employer is offering advancement & praise, why won't they pay for your MBA?

    It sounds like you have a good thing going with your current employer. Contacts are everything in business, why not see how far you can advance where you are?

    But if you plan to leave them, get this MBA & then try for a path to CFO job in another company, I think you'd be best advised to listen to the advice of those of us who have "been there, done that".



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    10,140

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    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    Holy cow. I outlined the logic I'd follow if this were me-- will the 30k investment pay for itself and result in the specific goal you laid out? Nothing in my post suggested this were a whim or that you are not capable or qualified. And yes, I committed the unforgivable error of missing the phrase "that I currently work for" buried somewhere at the bottom of the page, in one of several posts.
    I mentioned early retirement in the context of the CFO role, because you said want to get to CFO with enough time to then start a new career teaching, and then at 65 start travelling the world.
    I'm sorry I wasn't trying to be offensive to you, and the error certainly is not unforgivable. I didn't mean to make you feel that way. It just seems this thread is full of stuff that doesn't apply or what have you. And I love your idea about looking at the investment/debt long term, in fact I already have.

    The being in Costa Rica at 65 is definitely a far off whim thing right now though. But, eventually, I would like to be free to travel and work from wherever. Best would be a company that is very international and also teaching

    Again, I apologize if I misconstrued your intent. I think I just couldn't believe all the miscommunication in the whole thread!
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
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    10,140

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcadien View Post
    If your current employer is offering advancement & praise, why won't they pay for your MBA?

    It sounds like you have a good thing going with your current employer. Contacts are everything in business, why not see how far you can advance where you are?

    But if you plan to leave them, get this MBA & then try for a path to CFO job in another company, I think you'd be best advised to listen to the advice of those of us who have "been there, done that".
    I will stay where I am as long as there is progression.

    I respect and encourage folks to share their knowledge and wisdom. I haven't \gained success from cutting others off, not listening, and not being coachable BUT! And it's a big one, but! people who don't even read or know the facts giving non-pertinent advice in an arrogant manner are usually best ignored.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



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