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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2007
    Location
    Carthage, NC
    Posts
    221

    Smile Winter clinics: Boyd Martin clinic review

    At the beginning of the month, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to ride in a clinic with Boyd Martin. The weekend session was graciously hosted by Pepperwood Farm in Fuquay-Varina, NC, a lovely new facility that caters to riders of all disciplines. Mike Plumb and I work together 12-14 hours per day; perfection is expected, full attention is demanded, and excuses are null and void. JMP instantly jumped on the idea of Boyd's clinic and told me to sign up immediately, with JER's pretty, athletic, phenomenal mare, Zizi. (Z is 14.2hh of black Akhal-teke/TB perfection.)

    I had heard mixed reviews of Boyd's instruction, but went into the clinic with an open mind, knowing that I could learn a lot from any rider that JMP respects. In short, Boyd, very much like JMP, is trying to teach riders how to be better riders, and is trying to help horses to fully understand. I have nothing but rave reviews for this clinic-- Boyd's style, the exercises, the progression, everything was wonderful. Boyd was personable and friendly, gentle and encouraging, and kept the clinic nicely flowing forward. I must say, I was immensely impressed with his ability to keep a good humor and "teaching wits" about him at all times, even when presented with very difficult pairs.

    Individuals here on CotH have expressed complaints about Boyd's exercises being too hard, overfacing, or difficult. On these points, I must vehemently disagree. Boyd's exercises are foundational yet unique-- lessons that test basic wtc/straightness/adjustability, but aren't the same jump arrangements/questions that riders see every day. Because the skills tested in these exercises are the cornerstones in a horse's and rider's training, riders at any level should be able to handle their setup, particularly before setting foot outside of a closed arena. Walk/trot/canter, turn left, turn right, go straight, stay straight, lengthen stride, shorten stride: the exercises used to address these elements were NOT difficult questions. As presented, they were a suitable challenge, a good test in a novel environment. When they seemed difficult or confusing to a horse and rider pair, a weakness in a pair's training was readily apparent.

    Does that make Boyd a bad clinician? Nope. His exercises test the skills that all riders should aim to fully master. He does not try to "catch a rider out," but tries to show a rider where things need to be better. If a rider shows up unprepared with a crooked, unschooled, over-bitted, or unconditioned horse, there is only so much that any clinician can fix. Can't change the world in a two-day group jump school. As a clinician, you try to give riders exercises to better understand, better address, and better ride their horses. This is what Boyd does.

    If there is frustration or difficulty, does this make the participants bad riders or bad students? Nope. It just illustrates that the degree of training and proficiency are not necessarily where they could be. At some point every rider needs to be challenged to learn how to ride new skills correctly, outside of her every-day comfort zone. At what point does a clinician or instructor stop feeding into "Let's make it easier!" to nurture a rider's ego, and just say "Get on with it! Start riding!"? Someone needs to step up and say "HEY-- ride your horse correctly, train your horse properly, and Training level is going to be easy! Why? Because it's true." This is what Boyd does.

    Having said all this, Boyd appeared to be most within his comfort zone with riders -- regardless of their level-- who were set to go, could take instruction, to whom he could say "Hey, ride like this. Add stride here. Hands low, sit back. In this turn, do this. Here, do that." He knows what it takes to be a competent, effective rider, he can get the job done incredibly well with a prepared rider and horse, and someday he is going to be a mind-blowing team coach.

    So, to summarize. Boyd's style as a clinician: challenging, positive, reinforcing. Boyd's teaching: pretty darn clear and effective, if one pays attention, listens, tries to understand. Boyd's clinics: worth every penny, and then some. There are reasons he is one of the best, and that the best have much respect for his riding.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 1999
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,467

    Default

    More about the exercises, please



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2001
    Location
    Appomattox, VA, \"Where our Nation Reunited\"
    Posts
    383

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    Andrea, Thanks for the post, very inspiring as I am going to a Boyd Martin lesson Friday at Waredaca! Merry Christmas to me!
    Cheryl Microutsicos, in the heart of Virginia
    www.wowgraphicdesigns.com
    www.usea2.net
    www.foxhuntva.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    passepartout
    Posts
    10,164

    Default

    I started reading this without looking too closely and I was like, 'Oh look, someone else went to a Boyd Martin clinic.'

    I have some pics of my skinny pony at the clinic: 1, 2, 3, 4.

    This was one clinic I did have reservations about due to what I'd read on a previous thread. I said it was okay to take the mare only because the clinic was JMP's idea because he likes the way Boyd rides. I didn't want to get in the middle of that.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2002
    Location
    Looking up
    Posts
    6,279

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    You could have asked me, JER, I've ridden with him, and echo what Glenbaer said -- with emphasis. Can't get enough with him -- but I can only get into weekend things, and in my area (where he is located in the spring/summer/fall) he doesn't teach weekends, he competes.)
    An example of an exercise that we had (simple yet effective) is a 5-stride vertical to vertical on a bending line. Do it straight in 5. Do it bending in 6. You can't just sit there and haul on the face. And you have to line them up straight to do the five. Simple yet effective! HOW you did stuff was important.
    My horse was coming off a layoff and was a bit sticky at a new XC question at the facility which he had not seen. I kinda rode into it like a steeplechase jockey, leg on, sitting back, one hand on rein, other hand ready to tap with whip and then balanced myself sitting back as he leaped BIG from the encouragement. (It's called, "calling a cab". It's ugly but you don't fall off.)
    Boyd loved it, because I thought -- and rode like I wasn't sure he'd go, and he felt that was exactly what I should have done he first time. But then he cleaned up my technique and improved the whole exercise with a few hints.
    Yes, as Glenbaer said, if you are competent and come to learn you'll get a buttload from him. Even more if you watch all sessions as well as ride in your own.
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    passepartout
    Posts
    10,164

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    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    You could have asked me, JER, I've ridden with him, and echo what Glenbaer said -- with emphasis.
    I didn't know. This was the thread I'd read, and some very credible COTHers were not exactly endorsing Mr. Martin.

    In light of the OP on that thread -- who was having trouble with SJ -- I understand the feedback with post-Boyd perspective as Glenbaer said his clinic is more suited to established pairs. I don't find that a fault at all. Some clinicians are good for horses moving up, with others you might want to be more conservative.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2009
    Location
    Madisonville, la
    Posts
    521

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    This is very exciting to read this. I am headed to a Boyd clinic in 2 weeks at Texas Rose and I am so excited!!! Thanks for the wonderful review b/c I have heard mixed reviews but I know that every clinic. Ride in I always take away something very useful!!!
    No Worries!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2005
    Location
    close to the Big Apple
    Posts
    3,212

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    We sent our mare to that clinic. I was not there but the trainer was very pleased. Our mare has just moved up to Novice but was very pleased at how he handled the entire situation..
    Mai Tai aka Tyler RIP March 1994-December 2011
    Grief is the price we pay for love- Gretchen Jackson
    "And here she comes. Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's ZENYATTA!"



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