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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2012
    Posts
    45

    Default To work in the horse world or not?

    I've come to a crossroads in my life, and have really narrowed this complicated decision down to two basic situations (side note: this is only one of many ways I am trying to approach this decision. Other views on the situation are welcomed!)

    1. Having a non horsey job, making good income, owning my own property for the horses. I really want to train as well, so ideally want an indoor and trails, big place, eventually would like to transition out of the real job into training, but not sure if that would be very possible.

    2. Taking an "entry level" training job (English), making less money, not owning my own farm.

    My big thing is I would like to train someday, for a living - preferably in dressage and/or starting young horses. I feel 2 is a great opportunity for this, as I have the chance to take a job now where I would give beginner to intermediate lessons, be in charge of 5 or so lesson horses, organize clinics, shows, etc. There is a higher level trainer who works there as well (USDF silver and bronze medalist, "L" judge with distinction) who I like so far And feel I could learn a lot from.

    Chances are if I choose to dive into working in the horse world it is less likely I would ever be able to afford a really nice place of my own because I do want an indoor, space for trails and things which seem to be available at many boarding barns, but less common on private farms. I've also heard many horror stories about people who wanted their own place, got it, and they don't have time to work with their horses because of the upkeep of the farm(and I can see this, as right now I feel we barely keep up with house chores, much less having property and horses to look after and care for!) I also feel many trainers end up working for barns, not necessarily having their own (I admit though this is a feeling and I'm not sure of how true it is.)

    With that... What do you see as pros/cons for each situation given my goals of wanting to train? I always thought I would want to own my own place but wondering if that's what I really want now.

    Thanks in advance



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,057

    Default

    NOT

    Go with number 1. You can take lessons and train with great ppl and own a property then have your own buisness... Easy peasy
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"


    5 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,397

    Default

    I guess it depends what your safety net looks like. (not asking you to describe it here!). if you have family or other financial support you can fall back on, and if you have a way to get health insurance that you can afford, then your risk in taking the horse job is considerably less than the avg hroseperson.
    If your safety net is iffy, then go with good income (and health insurance!!!!) as long as that's not a soul-sucking career that makes you want to die.
    i think its probably easier to move from the "regular" employment world into he horse employment world, vs starting with the horse job and then trying to make it seem relevant in the biz world.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,724

    Default

    Nootka nailed it out the gate.

    I tried this. When you are young, which is what you sound, people will take advantage of you. No insurance for the most part. It's hard, it sucks, you envy the boarders/students who show up and leave when the weather is crap.

    Go number 1, attend clinics and lessons and show and then go the route you want to go. Build a nest egg.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2005
    Posts
    1,604

    Default

    I agree with the above! I would also suggest that you buy a prospect horse and train it and then sell it and continue the process, This gives you the opportunity to test your skills and see what others feel about your skill without you jumping in the deepend. Besides, you can make a few $$and enjoy the process. Then you will have a good idea of your ability before you decide to make a switch.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,428

    Default

    Do a business plan first - based on the going rates in your area as far as training goes, and based on the price of everything you need to keep a place up and running. You will need hired help. Also factor in health insurance and retirement savings. It may make the decision easy for you.

    Consider getting a job somewhere as an assistant trainer or similar position - it sounds like you have this opportunity now. It may be worthwhile to "live the life" for a few years before committing hundreds of thousands of dollars to that life, and finding out that the daily grind is just not for you. Working as a trainer without having all the headaches of owning the facility can be the best of both worlds, especially in a dodgy economy. Lenders do not like self-employment, so getting a regular salary can go further in allowing you to ultimately accomplish your dreams.

    Use dollars and sense to make your decision, and remember, stay flexible because things are always changing. Good luck!!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2012
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the responses! The more I think about it I think taking the higher paying non-horsey job is probably better. I really want a trailer and to be able to show and go to clinics, and need $$ for all of that. Think I have a better chance of taking my horse to his potential if I have the $$ to show and go to clinics and take lessons.

    Thanks again! Your responses have helped in my decision


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,465

    Default Well, you can do both, but it takes longer.

    I started with #1. There is, for most of us, a ceiling that without some big money owners, we will never break thru. That is just reality. Eventually, you get to the "well, I'm now xx years old, this is as far as this train goes". If I ride it longer, the train won't go anywhere else, I'll just be XX years old. Then you have a choice, you can do either:

    #2 was, get a good job so I can afford to do what I want with the horse I can now afford to ride/train/show/ that someone else is taking care of. Did that, quite content for a few years, then go to:

    #3 Marry well.(quite by accident) Get an even better job. (also quite by accident) Build a fantastic place with everything to have a major training/show barn. Buy horses, teach lessons, watch local economy take a dive. Sell lesson horses, try boarding. Give up on that due to local economy. Keep good job, keep great husband. Keep horses at home, ride when you have time, aren't too tired from good job/husband that pays for it all. Screw up shoulder, have surgery, screw up other shoulder, make arrangments to send two horses out for the winter since barn help is unreliable. Look forward to feeding 3 cats living in the luxurious 12 stall barn that your horses will not be in until spring. Look longingly at indoor arena filled with company/farm equipment because, well, your shoulder has been wonky all summer and you weren't using it so, well of course you can park the camper-dumptruck-bucket truck-dually-box truck-and three utility trailers in there, no I'm not riding right now.

    You can do what your love, and be happy, I was. You can do what you need to and have more free time to enjoy what you love (I did) or you can, once in a while, get your absolute dream, which will be what you make of it.

    If your young, and you have a good chance to ride/train with someone really really good, and really really respected, and you don't do anything foolish like having a child before you have an education, and a social life isn't all that important, then #1 can be very satisfiying for a very long time.

    You'll know when it isn't working. It might work forever.

    Just remember, if you get hurt, and can't work, you will have nothing to fall back on, so plan accordingly.

    Good luck.

    I don't often wish I was 20 again, I just wish I knew then what I know now.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,428

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndyrgal View Post

    #3 Marry well.(quite by accident) Get an even better job. (also quite by accident) Build a fantastic place with everything to have a major training/show barn. Buy horses, teach lessons, watch local economy take a dive. Sell lesson horses, try boarding. Give up on that due to local economy. Keep good job, keep great husband. Keep horses at home, ride when you have time, aren't too tired from good job/husband that pays for it all. Screw up shoulder, have surgery, screw up other shoulder, make arrangments to send two horses out for the winter since barn help is unreliable. Look forward to feeding 3 cats living in the luxurious 12 stall barn that your horses will not be in until spring. Look longingly at indoor arena filled with company/farm equipment because, well, your shoulder has been wonky all summer and you weren't using it so, well of course you can park the camper-dumptruck-bucket truck-dually-box truck-and three utility trailers in there, no I'm not riding right now.
    OMG, I just need to get that shoulder sx and we're twins...



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