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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
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    NJ
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    In response to keeping the hind end/tail clean...

    If the tail bags don't work for you, have you tried liberally coating the tail with Showsheen so the manure can't stick as easily? I would also coat the hind legs with either Showsheen or some type of product (like baby oil gel) so the manure won't stick to the hair and scald the skin. Sometimes you have to play around to find the right product.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2007
    Location
    Oxford, PA
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    183

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    Quote Originally Posted by mkevent View Post
    In response to keeping the hind end/tail clean...

    If the tail bags don't work for you, have you tried liberally coating the tail with Showsheen so the manure can't stick as easily? I would also coat the hind legs with either Showsheen or some type of product (like baby oil gel) so the manure won't stick to the hair and scald the skin. Sometimes you have to play around to find the right product.
    I've tried baby oil and show sheen. But, I can't say that I've been super liberal with it. It's definitely worth a try. I've haven't used it on her legs though. Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by twhs View Post
    We had problem with diarrhea for two years, trying everything! Certain time of the year, or a particular product, or taking new advice would appear like the problem was solved but it was always temporary. Finally, tho (and I should knock on wood) and for almost a year, we have wonderful poop. What we did was switch off hay entirely and began feeding speedi-beet mixed with Triple Crown feed and Timothy pellets. We feed 3 - 4 times a day depending on the pony's workload. A friend at a neighboring barn feeds her horse a similar diet and for the same reason and it's worked well for her, too. Both her horse and our pony graze in pasture w grazing muzzles. Hope this helps.
    That's the thing. She's only usually on hay for half the year and the other half she's out on pasture. She even wore a grazing muzzle 24/7 for a good part of the summer a couple years ago (she needed help so she didn't explore weight wise). She's actually worse on pasture. Lots of almost liquid manure. But, it doesn't stick in her tail for some odd reason.

    As a side note, she does terribly on soy and not great on beet pulp (though she's on it now). We also had a founder scare a year ago (turns out it likely was multiple abscesses in her hind feet, and all her blood tests were normal, but I'm super cautious about her weight right now)... Mare is definitely a walking vet bill...


    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow36 View Post
    S. boullardii is a probiotic that has been proven in horses to be useful for colitis in hospital settings. Mostly used for acute colitis (like associated with antibiotics, stress or colic); but I know a lot of vets prescribing it for chronic cases with good success. It certainly couldn't hurt and it's not that expensive (about $1/day for the Swanson product).

    You can buy it at a store like GMC, or I get it online from Swanson. 3 capsules twice a day (the Swanson ones easily twist apart and you can sprinkle it on the feed).
    Thanks, I'll look into it. Definitely worth a try. She'll eat anything so they shouldn't be too much of an issue.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
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    2,239

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    Vaseline or desitin both work well on the bum - and help soothe the chaffed areas also.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
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    NJ
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    Is she blanketed in the winter?

    Just asking because sometimes blankets with tail covers don't allow them to lift their tails as high, possibly contributing to the manure on the tail/legs issue.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
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    1,395

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    [QUOTE=pompeiii;6734821]
    She's actually worse on pasture. Lots of almost liquid manure. But, it doesn't stick in her tail for some odd reason.
    QUOTE]

    Sounds like classic hind gut acidosis. Often perturbed by forages higher in sugar and fructans....especially fresh pasture. These are more issue than grains for some horses cuz when you think about it they eat so much more forage as a percent of the ration.

    Get some soyhull pellets. Start slowly increasing the pellets and replace about 6lbs of hay with the soyhull pellets. Soaking hay may help too, but some hays are still too high even after soaked for these horses with more delicate hindguts.

    Also get some Diarsynal Plus. This is what I am talking about...

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...20plus%20paste

    You are wasting money on probiotics until you change the environment of the horses hind gut. That requires a diet of fermentable fiber very, very low in NSC and really paying attention to WSC.

    Beet pulp may or may not be low enough. As you said she does not do so great on it. There is actually a pretty wide range of NSC (and WSC) for beet pulp. Some of it not really so low. Maybe the processing in older plants is a factor there but I really do not know.

    Oat hulls can be great too. But hard to find. But what I do is buy mill run light weight oats (not premium) and feed in moderation. These are more hull and less groat. Oat bran in moderation is also smart as a great source of beta glucan. Oat bran is harder to find tho.

    Here is a list and keep in mind you need to put together a strict diet low not just in NSC but emphasis on low WSC...

    http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/Forms/NSCCircular.pdf



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2010
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    630

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    My gelding had watery manure the first few years I had him. Vet said not to worry about it, it wasn't bad enough to cause dehydration, and she said a lot of horses have this issue. I tried ProBios with no success.

    This spring I put both horses on SmartHoof, mostly for the copper and zinc. It also contains a probiotic. His manure firmed right up! You might try SmartHoof, or SmartDigest. Both are pretty cheap to try as an experiment. Whatever they are using seemed to really help my gelding!



  7. #27

    Default Chronic diarrhea - in an otherwise healthy horse?

    I absolutely swear by Vapco's DIGEST IT, and I have used it for over 8 years. I had a terrible time solving chronic diarrhea in my HEALTHY Thoroughbred gelding from the day I got him, and I tried everything - Probios and a half dozen other similar products. The ONLY thing that worked was Digest It. (And he pretty much grew new feet after I started to use their product BEAR CAT, at a farrier's recommendation.) My horse has a primarily grass pasture and grass hay based diet, and if he misses even a few days worth of his Digest It, the diarrhea comes back. I stock pile it...



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2011
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    246

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow36 View Post
    S. boullardii is a probiotic ...
    You can buy it at a store like GMC, or I get it online from Swanson. 3 capsules twice a day (the Swanson ones easily twist apart and you can sprinkle it on the feed).
    Be careful here--I got some Florastor (S. boullardii for humans) and opened the capsules. My horse wouldn't eat his food. So I took a taste of the powder--horrible! No idea if all brands taste so bad.
    My boy has chronic diarrhea. I've used Proviable EQ, which has Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to help in some of his worse episodes. Using 10 mL of Probios gel 2-3 times a week usually keeps it under control. I've also used Immediate Response in some of the worse times too. I also get him high fat, high fiber grain--currently TC Senior.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
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    2,239

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    I use the Swanson caps daily on a mare that is currently on antibiotics for a tooth. She eats them readily opened up and sprinkled on feed (and she is a VERY picky eater).



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2007
    Location
    Oxford, PA
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    183

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    Quote Originally Posted by mkevent View Post
    Is she blanketed in the winter?

    Just asking because sometimes blankets with tail covers don't allow them to lift their tails as high, possibly contributing to the manure on the tail/legs issue.
    That's a really good point. Combined with the less than liquid poop in the winter, the tail flap of her blanket might be in the way. I might have too look at blankets without tail flaps in the future for her. Of course, she JUST got a new turnout a week and a half ago and my horses are very easy on clothing, but I'll keep my eyes open come blanket sale time.

    Quote Originally Posted by D Taylor View Post

    Sounds like classic hind gut acidosis. Often perturbed by forages higher in sugar and fructans....especially fresh pasture. These are more issue than grains for some horses cuz when you think about it they eat so much more forage as a percent of the ration.

    Get some soyhull pellets. Start slowly increasing the pellets and replace about 6lbs of hay with the soyhull pellets. Soaking hay may help too, but some hays are still too high even after soaked for these horses with more delicate hindguts.

    Also get some Diarsynal Plus. This is what I am talking about...

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...20plus%20paste

    You are wasting money on probiotics until you change the environment of the horses hind gut. That requires a diet of fermentable fiber very, very low in NSC and really paying attention to WSC.

    Beet pulp may or may not be low enough. As you said she does not do so great on it. There is actually a pretty wide range of NSC (and WSC) for beet pulp. Some of it not really so low. Maybe the processing in older plants is a factor there but I really do not know.

    Oat hulls can be great too. But hard to find. But what I do is buy mill run light weight oats (not premium) and feed in moderation. These are more hull and less groat. Oat bran in moderation is also smart as a great source of beta glucan. Oat bran is harder to find tho.

    Here is a list and keep in mind you need to put together a strict diet low not just in NSC but emphasis on low WSC...

    http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/Forms/NSCCircular.pdf
    Thanks. This is sort of what I suspect is going on. The problem is, eliminating forage (or severely reducing) isn't necessarily easy/an option. I have 3 horses who live at home. They live out 24/7 with access to a run in shed. I can divide them for grain type meals, but without locking her in the small dry lot, alone, 24/7, I can't keep her off pasture/out of the hay. Not to mention the others would not have access to shelter either. With my current set up, removing these things would be incredibly challenging. And boarding the (often crippled) mare isn't an option financially right now either.

    Ultimately, it's finding a balance of things that keep her comfortable and healthy as possible. She stays very hydrated (she's a big drinker) and her weight is typically decent. As long as she's comfortable and happy, then we'll keep moving forward. Once something becomes too much for her (arthritis, diarrhea, weight, pain, etc.), then it's time to say goodbye.

    But, you've given me a lot to think about. While not practical right now (winter), this might be something to try in the summer when the pasture is back with a grazing muzzle. She does have a soy allergy but I know people say the soy hulls shouldn't be an issue. She also typically does VERY well on oats. I might see about finding oat bran and replacing the beet pulp with that. I'll talk to my two main feed stores and see what they can find/order.

    Quote Originally Posted by newhorsemommy View Post
    My gelding had watery manure the first few years I had him. Vet said not to worry about it, it wasn't bad enough to cause dehydration, and she said a lot of horses have this issue. I tried ProBios with no success.

    This spring I put both horses on SmartHoof, mostly for the copper and zinc. It also contains a probiotic. His manure firmed right up! You might try SmartHoof, or SmartDigest. Both are pretty cheap to try as an experiment. Whatever they are using seemed to really help my gelding!
    Interesting. She's been on a bunch of different supplements but it's worth looking at ingredients. Her hooves used to be terrible (she was super abscess prone), but since changing feeds in the spring, her hooves look incredibly and knock on wood...

    Quote Originally Posted by SummersPastFarm View Post
    I absolutely swear by Vapco's DIGEST IT, and I have used it for over 8 years. I had a terrible time solving chronic diarrhea in my HEALTHY Thoroughbred gelding from the day I got him, and I tried everything - Probios and a half dozen other similar products. The ONLY thing that worked was Digest It. (And he pretty much grew new feet after I started to use their product BEAR CAT, at a farrier's recommendation.) My horse has a primarily grass pasture and grass hay based diet, and if he misses even a few days worth of his Digest It, the diarrhea comes back. I stock pile it...
    Thanks for the recommendation.



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