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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2011
    Posts
    18

    Default Needing some advice....

    Ok so, the weekend before thanksgiving, my 5yo Thoroughbred mare and another mare were meeting & greeting.... They both swapped ends and kicked at each other. We're not exactly sure what happened, but thinking they hit hoof to hoof. Luckily the other horse is totally fine, but my mare now has a pretty good size chip in her LH After 2 sets of x rays, an ultrasound, and several sets of eyes, no one can seem to figure out if the chip is off of the sesamoid or the cannon bone. She has been in a stall since with recent walks outside to graze a bit. The surgeon quoted the surgery at around $2,000 give or take some. Unfortunately, this is a bit out of my price range right now. So, I am not sure what to do with her... She has been a really good girl through the vet visits, the poulticing, the cold hosing, the wrapping, ect ect ect.. But is starting to get a little funky in the stall She has never been one to crib or weave and I would really like to keep it that way! But being a 5yo TB after being inside for over a month, she's starting to jump around in her stall and get grouchy.. At a walk, she's probably 99% sound.. So I guess my question is, what would you do? I've gotten a bit of ace to give her to keep her chilled out but hate to have to do that all the time.. Should I start weaning her out with the leg wrapped well? Thoughts.. Suggestions... Anything is much appreciated! Merry Christmas everyone!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    410

    Default

    No advice, but so sorry !



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2008
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Sorry to hear about your mare. As to her doing anything out of her stall, talk to your vet. They should be able to tell you what you can do with out causing more harm.
    You also may want to speak with your vet about putting your horse on an ulcer or stomach soothing medication or supplement. With all the time in a stall she may be stressing out and creating a stomach ulcer. If your vet thinks it's a good idea to give an ulcer/stomach soothing supplement, I've found some horses will eat U-gard pellets without grain. That way you don't have to worry about giving her any extra energy with grain.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2011
    Posts
    18

    Default

    My vet is saying no turnout.. Mare was on ranitidine but my vet said to stop giving it to her till I am able to schedule the surgery



  5. #5

    Default

    I'd mildly sedate and start giving 1/4 tube of gastroguard daily. Or you will have a wall climbing lunatic with ulcers who may injure herself further.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,730

    Default

    Not sure if this would be a possibility for you, but my friends gelding fractured his humorous in a freak accident and had to be kept stall bound for 6-8 weeks. They actually made him a "stall" out of fencing panels along side the pasture he was normally in, wound up being like 15'x15' or so. When everybody went out for morning turnout so did he. I think the change of scenery really helped with his mood. As an added benefit they could move his "stall" around so he could graze some as well.

    I know that we were very fortunate that this was an option as its not in a lot of boarding situations. But if it is a possibility it might help
    You can't fix stupid.... but you can breed it!


    9 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Location
    The Isle of Wight
    Posts
    725

    Default

    We just had a horse in the barn that had surgery on a tendon in the LH and the vet suggested a calming supplement to keep him as even keeled as possible during the lay-up and re-integration of turnout.

    The owner had him on the SmartCalm Ultra and said she noticed a big difference. Of course, it did not alleviate all issues, but it made him much more manageable during his lay-up period.

    I second the other poster's suggestion for some gastric aid during this time - omeprazole, preferably, and maybe some soaked alfalfa cubes once per day.

    Good Luck... I hope your mare feels better



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2011
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Thank you all!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsegal984 View Post
    Not sure if this would be a possibility for you, but my friends gelding fractured his humorous in a freak accident and had to be kept stall bound for 6-8 weeks. They actually made him a "stall" out of fencing panels along side the pasture he was normally in, wound up being like 15'x15' or so. When everybody went out for morning turnout so did he. I think the change of scenery really helped with his mood. As an added benefit they could move his "stall" around so he could graze some as well.

    I know that we were very fortunate that this was an option as its not in a lot of boarding situations. But if it is a possibility it might help
    My trainer did this with her stallion. When the horses went out in the morning he went to an outside stall where he could watch the daily activity of the ranch. It helped with his boredom.
    Dawn

    Patience and Consistency are Your Friends


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    I'd have no qualms using medication to help keep a stall rested horse from injuring itself or other people. However, there are many types of portable outdoor pens that can be used as outdoor "stalls" and these are invaluable for stall rested layups. There are round pens that can be purchased by the panel, tall chain-link panel stalls (my favorite set up), or for an easy horse you could even just put a few gates together to make a small pen. I also am of the opinion that vets often are too aggressive about recommending stall rest, which is a therapy that has a lot of downsides. Anyway, a 1200 lb. horse going crazy in a 12x14 stall is probably putting more stress on their injury/issue than a horse that is turned out with a quiet buddy in a small paddock with a pile of hay, possibly with some sedatives on board. Of course, it depends on the horse and on the specific issue and the turnout/supervision/buddy/medication options.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2012
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Has the vet said anything about hand-walking sessions? I know you said "walks outside to graze," but I wasn't sure how long those sessions lasted.

    My guy (7yo OTTB) has a bone chip, and I'm also lacking the funds for surgery. Thankfully, it's non-interfering in its current location, but if there's inflamation, it does get irritated. Every injury and horse is different, but is your vet aware that your horse is not enjoying the stall rest? Mine created a treatment plan with the knowledge that my horse barely tolerates stall time (he's a cribber and a stall walker), and that I would not be able to pay for surgery any time soon.

    Agreed with others that note that going crazy in a stall is not going to help with her injury. Also, what are you feeding her? I have dialed back on my guy's grain, and amped his hay- plus I scatter it around his stall to give him something to think about besides his own boredom.

    Good luck, Merry Christmas, and jingles for your mare!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    433

    Default

    My OTTB had surgery in Sept. and had to be on stall rest for 2 months. I agree with Ulcerguard, some toys (although mine never played with his) and a small hole hay net. Give her as much hay as you can. We cut my guy's grain, but he lost weight, so watch carefully. Hand graze as much as possible. My guy is quiet and he had two windows to look out of, so he was pretty happy, but I wouldn't hesitate to resort to drugs. Good luck!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    My vet has let me do payment, if needed. I've been a good, paying customer. I had a break in my lifetime horse's navicular. Had surgery, turned him out for a year (I own the farm) and he has been riding sound. Even with one eye now, he has taught people to do lead changes.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



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