The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2002
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    6,170

    Question Question about horse rescues - should they stay local, or rescue all over?

    Updated post #24

    I am NOT trying to start a train wreck here, I just have a genuine question. I have many friends on Facebook who are in the horse world, either as trainers, breeders, horse show folks, and just regular back yard riders. I also have a few rescues on my friend list, and when I see a horse that I may be able to help, I share him/her.

    But not long ago, something came to my attention that really rubbed me the wrong way. I am going to try and be pretty general here, as I do not want to tarnish anyone's reputation, but basically, a rescue saw a horse that was in a "kill pen" was older, lame, and across the country from them. The horse's price was $500 and shipping was going to be $1500, so they were asking $1500 in donations. Now, I think it's very kind that they wanted to help the old soul, but I also couldn't help but think of how many horses - locally - $1500 could help save.

    I get that they wanted to help, but I wonder if maybe instead they could have tried to find a home closer to where the horse was located?

    So, my question is, how do you feel about rescues getting horses across the country from them? Do you feel it is money well spent, as at least the horse gets a good home, or do you feel they should instead concentrate there efforts to local horses in need?
    Last edited by Freebird!; Dec. 17, 2012 at 08:31 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    =Local=
    I have an issue with local rescues spending/asking for 1000$ of dollars to rescue a horse a couple thousand miles away when there are horses in need at the killpen 20 miles down the road. I quit supporting a local rescue after they pulled a similar stunt - good PR yet, but eh, I'd rather they'd spent that dough on helping several horses close at hand , rather then 1 way over there>
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,640

    Default wise use of resources

    With the price of gas, I think it bears looking at.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,307

    Default

    I'd vote local. Now if the rescue were to see this horse, contact a rescue local to this horse and send funds I could see that - but $1500 just for shipping when there are other horses in need? C'mon.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    810

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rainechyldes View Post
    =Local=
    I have an issue with local rescues spending/asking for 1000$ of dollars to rescue a horse a couple thousand miles away when there are horses in need at the killpen 20 miles down the road.
    THIS. Especially when the group has to beg for money all the time. And also when the horse(s) are probably never going to do anything besides be pasture puffs. (Of course, I also have a problem with small rescues who target specific breeds or types of horses. Which usually means they go all over the country for these rescues.)

    But that's just me. It just seems like the money could go a lot further if they targeted local horses in need.
    The dude abides ...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2004
    Location
    Suburbs of Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    522

    Default

    I guess it depends. If it's a breed rescue that someone has a particular affinity for, absolutely, wherever the "rescuer" should be - so should the horse!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2005
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    5,219

    Default

    As someone involved in horse rescue, I feel local need should be met first. Then regional. Then you can think about helping horses 2000 miles away.

    The only exception might be in cases of unusual, huge events. Few years back some wingding overloaded his trailer full of Belgian & headed toward a slaughter plant. The trailer crashed leaving 40some horses injured and in need of immediate help. Rescue groups all over the region stepped in, because that's just too many horses in one day for one single horse shelter.

    For the rescue I'm involved with, the organization owns its own stock trailer. We can pick up the horse for the cost of gas, which works out to be half or even less than a pro hauler. I have nothing against pro haulers (they have to make a living, too!). But when a rescue has limited funds, I personally feel it's best to find ways to maximize the % of donations that goes directly to horse care/feed/rehab.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,427

    Default

    I agree with philosraptor. Meet local need first. Assist in emergencies such as the one she described. When local need has been met, assist elsewhere as resources permit.

    And I wish small animal rescues would do that too. We are spending huge sums on animals in other parts of the country, trying to get them here to be adopted. While local animals are put down left and right. We could have saved and placed ten animals for the amount of money spent on one animal 1200 miles away. But that one animal had that emotional appeal added to its photo...... And those ten other animals were just sitting in a shelter cage .....waiting.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    I try to remind myself that as long as the rescue is following the law, informing its donors of what it is doing, and acting ethically that I shouldn't care if they rescue from their backyard or 2000 miles away.

    BUT I will admit that it really bothers me to see rescues buying horses AT ALL. I'm turning away tons of horses every week that we can't help. These horses are FREE because their owners cannot care for them (turned away 40 TBs this week alone - did tell the owners if they got me a list of horses, I would send out some emails and try to find people to take them).

    I want to see rescues put their dollars to the best use possible, and I don't think spending $2K on one horse to ship it across the country is a great use of resources. Unless there are no free (or even cheap) horses nearby looking for homes.
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2003
    Posts
    1,897

    Default

    I think rescues should stay within a certain radius. I know some who have adopted out horses several states away - the adopter paid for the shipping - but the adopter decided they didn't want the horse and wouldn't pay to ship it back. The rescue had to beg for money, over $1,000, to get the horse back.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    I agree with philosraptor. Meet local need first. Assist in emergencies such as the one she described. When local need has been met, assist elsewhere as resources permit.
    Same here. I also donate to the local rescue organizations first when I can.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,300

    Default

    Local needs first.

    I don't support "rescues" that buy from kill pens, doing the mass buy and flip. Too many are scams and horse traders trying to wrap themselves in clean linen.

    I like to donate to groups that I feel use the money efficiently. Hence the local support...no way is the closest needy horse 1200 miles away.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,481

    Default

    golly, I got myself a roasted bottom a while back when I questioned a rescue spending money on something a bit out there...can't quiet remember what it was.

    I have to say that local needs ought to be put first.
    Having said that, I do not mind breed specific rescues. Maybe because I first found rescues for dogs, you gotta specialize or you end up like the pound...

    I also don't mind 'importing' adoptable pets from the south to the north. As I understand at least small dogs don't make it through northern winters well...in the south they breed like rats....but then the wrapper makes it...(do we need to import dogs from the Caribbean?)

    I don't mind brokers in cheap horses either. I don't care for the 'buy now or it ships' tag line.

    But I really don't see why 'my' money should be used to clean up a mess 10 states over. Thee is enough mess here to deal with.

    Then again, if you are upfront with it....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2009
    Location
    The Land of Dixie
    Posts
    1,510

    Default

    I would think with fuel as high as it is, that rescuing local is the better way to go. I understand the motive to save "long distnce" when some "special case" like a "name" TB or other "famous" horse or a particular breed ends up in a kill pen.

    But honestly, I wish the horse rescues would get their acts more together and "network" with each other better. Some of the breed specific dog rescues are already doing this with great success. For example, there is or was a group called Labs 4 rescue that was pulling purebred labs from the kill shelters down south were these dogs are a dime a dozen and tansporting them up north where apparently they were not as common. The organized a monthly trip hauled the labs from down south up to waiting homes up north that had already been approved.

    The rescue had volunteers who would drive the dogs at least to Tennessee, where they would them be loaded onto another van or truck for their destination in a New England state. The adopters from all around New England met the second transport van at a designated point and the adoptions were completed there.

    I had first-hand experience with them back in 2002 when I fostered a black lab pulled from a high kill shelter for them. He was a nice young black lab about a year old, and I had him for six months before they found the perfect match for him up north. I still get a couple emails a year and pictures at Christmas from his adopter. He's a grand old man now, and in his twilight years.

    Two breed specific examples would be the nice draft horses (Belgians and Percherons and their crosses) that go to New Holland and end up headed for slaughter in Canada, and the nice gaited horses (TWHs, MFT, Racking Horses, etc) that go through auctions held in middle Tennessee and end up on trucks for Mexican slaughter houses.

    The old midwest (Ohio and PA) and the northeast are literally crawling with drafts from what I understand, but they are a pretty rare horse down here in the south. While gaited horses are are a dime a dozen down south, but not so common up north.

    I know it would be more challenging to coordinate horse transports than it is to do dog transports, but it could be done. Most of the breed specific dog and cat rescues have volunteers in each state. The local volunteers closest to the pound where the dog is spring it, and it is fostered locally. But the rescue advertises its dogs on the internet and does arrange adoptions either within a state or region or even nationally. The dog rescues are usually, but not always, connected with and supported by people (often breeders) interested in that particular breed.

    I really don't know why a rescue would involve itself in trying to buy horses many, many states away and then have to pay for shipping as well, when there good horses often being offered free or for next-to-nothing these days in the newspaper classifieds, on craigslist and even in notices tacked up at the feed stores.

    For the $1,500 spent on one long-distance "save" they could probably get as many as six or seven horses at the local auction, from craigslist or as owner surrenders.

    Horses are going so cheaply down here (or not selling at all) that a couple of the monthly auctions have suspended sales the past several months. A couple are now requiring a seller to pay a $50 deposit per horse and are checking IDs of people wanting to consign their horses because lots of people have just up and left their horses at the auction when they didn't sell.

    With the drought in Texas, hay is going to be hard to come by or expensive this winter from what I hear, so things are only going to get worse. And fuel prices have not really gone down much and probably won't.

    Sorry to have run on. To restate my position, I think we need to begin thinking more local about everything including horse rescue.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,062

    Default

    OK, I'll be the voice of semi-dissent here --

    This falls under my parenting rule: "If it works, do it".

    If it is working for the rescue and its supporters then I don't think it is anyone's business how a rescue rescues. Full stop.

    If you don't like how an operation is run, i.e. if you only want to support rescues that work locally -- don't support the ones that rescue nationally. It is no big deal!

    On the other hand -- if it isn't working, then the rescue's practices need to change.

    If things are working (horses are getting helped, supporters are happy, the IRS is happy) then I really don't like other people telling rescues (or anyone else for that matter) they *should* do it differently.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,300

    Default

    I don't disagree, SMF, just give my $$ to the ones I believe spend it most wisely.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Posts
    421

    Default

    This is why I research the rescue(s) what I support. I also research human charities to be sure where my $ is spent. Since I have only limited $ to donate I want the most bang for my buck that I can get. Local shelters that limit themselves to local needs usually spend my dollars best.



  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lolalola View Post
    I think rescues should stay within a certain radius. I know some who have adopted out horses several states away - the adopter paid for the shipping - but the adopter decided they didn't want the horse and wouldn't pay to ship it back. The rescue had to beg for money, over $1,000, to get the horse back.
    The rescue I know...they used to allow horses to go anywhere within the continental US, so long as the adopter had stellar references and paid for shipping themselves...and agreed that in the event they had to send the horse back, they'd pay for shipping then too.

    Yeah, after two or three adopters in a row were like, "the horse must leave ASAP and no I can't pay!" and the horses came back in worse condition than they went out (training problems that weren't there before, lots of weight lost...)...well, the rescue started limiting adoptions to a radius that makes it possible for them to go with their trailer on short notice, as opposed to being stuck with the bill for a hauler.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bayou_bengal View Post
    But honestly, I wish the horse rescues would get their acts more together and "network" with each other better. Some of the breed specific dog rescues are already doing this with great success.
    Horse rescuers are -very- hard to network with. I've tried working with other rescues and it has been a nightmare. It might be because our group focuses on neglect cases, not the 'buy them from the evil slaughter man and ship them across the country' type deals. But I've tried to work together with another rescue, more than once, to do a large seizure. Each time, the other rescues don't want to do the hard work, but they want to get territorial about who is the "lead" rescue, who gets the most media attention, etc. Often they don't know HOW to do a horse seizure properly either and our group has to supervise.

    We've also been involved in seizing animals from people claiming to be rescues, so I am a bit jaded about trusting someone with the label of rescue.

    (I sound so cynical and jaded this morning!).

    I did try to reach out to the 501c3 rescues I could find in Texas and have us form a coalition. The smaller, start-up rescues wanted in and told me they thought I should turn our organization's large annual fundraiser into a group fundraiser (which would be great for them and awful for us). The larger rescues told me they had no need to be in any sort of coalition. *sigh*

    Yeah, I am jaded today!
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirljenn View Post
    Horse rescuers are -very- hard to network with. I've tried working with other rescues and it has been a nightmare. It might be because our group focuses on neglect cases, not the 'buy them from the evil slaughter man and ship them across the country' type deals. But I've tried to work together with another rescue, more than once, to do a large seizure. Each time, the other rescues don't want to do the hard work, but they want to get territorial about who is the "lead" rescue, who gets the most media attention, etc. Often they don't know HOW to do a horse seizure properly either and our group has to supervise.

    We've also been involved in seizing animals from people claiming to be rescues, so I am a bit jaded about trusting someone with the label of rescue.

    (I sound so cynical and jaded this morning!).

    I did try to reach out to the 501c3 rescues I could find in Texas and have us form a coalition. The smaller, start-up rescues wanted in and told me they thought I should turn our organization's large annual fundraiser into a group fundraiser (which would be great for them and awful for us). The larger rescues told me they had no need to be in any sort of coalition. *sigh*

    Yeah, I am jaded today!

    Too early to put on the rose colored glasses?

    nah, you don't sound jaded. Burned, maybe. But it pretty much echos the impression I have gotten over the years of not dealing with them how most horse rescues are run.
    Or how people function: You do the work I get the credit (and money) yeah, right!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



Similar Threads

  1. Local horse rescue...problem.
    By LauraKY in forum Off Course
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jun. 10, 2012, 05:47 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Oct. 3, 2011, 02:13 PM
  3. Rescues looking ror new rescue or home NO ADOPTION FEE (NC)
    By graceridgefarms in forum Giveaways
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Mar. 9, 2010, 11:28 AM
  4. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Oct. 25, 2009, 09:15 PM
  5. I'm Beside Myself About a Local Horse Rescue
    By FancyASB in forum Off Course
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Oct. 5, 2009, 03:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •