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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,731

    Default

    I changed my trailer with 2 HB babies on 76 in Pa by myself. No issue. My trainers tire blew out on the way home from Warrenton. Again. Trailer aid was awesome. His lugs got stuck, swabbed baby oil on them and off they came. I felt so clever.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    Another suggestion is to have more than one spare. I had the unfortunate experience of having two blowouts and only one spare. After the first blowout, I though all was good after my husband changed the tire. I had two horses in the trailer and the trailer aid worked great. I did exit the freeway though. As I was almost back to the barn, a second tire blew. Thank goodness I was about a mile to the barn, so I just put my hazards on and crawled back. The next day, trailer received four brand new tires and two new spares.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2010
    Posts
    850

    Default

    Not sure if anyone said this yet, but to make your life easier for when you *do* need to change a tire on the side of the road: practice at home first. Preferably at night, in the rain


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,303

    Default

    A second spare is always good. Since trailer tires are so close together, If a road hazard gets the first tire, it might get the second as well.

    In any case, When traveling far from home, having the second spare allows me to get the flat repaired/replaced at home instead of away. ..



  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2004
    Location
    Linden, CA
    Posts
    856

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hosspuller View Post
    The trailer-aid is the best for changing a tire loaded with horses. I have changed several tires using it. (Fully loaded 3 horse)
    I can't say "several", but I agree with the rest. Keep the horses in the trailer and away from the traffic. Use the Trailer-aid. (Make sure you have the lug wrench and a good spare as well!) Drive away feeling smarter than the average bear, because you are.
    Quote Originally Posted by HuntrJumpr
    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,303

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ambar View Post
    I can't say "several", but I agree with the rest. Keep the horses in the trailer and away from the traffic. Use the Trailer-aid. (Make sure you have the lug wrench and a good spare as well!) Drive away feeling smarter than the average bear, because you are.
    The first two trailer-aid tire changes were blow outs. After new tires all around, the third trailer-aid change was a road hazard puncture. Trailer-aid road side use experiance doesn't come cheap.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
    Posts
    2,215

    Default

    I LOVE my US Rider and they've taken care of me in a pinch, but I'd much rather use the Trailer-Aid for a simple tire change. Horses stay on board. As long as you're not in sand or on uneven ground, it works great! Unloading horses along a busy road would pretty much ALWAYS be my last choice.
    The rebel in the grey shirt



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2002
    Location
    The horse country of VA
    Posts
    3,326

    Default

    Just a note about the Trailer Aid. BE SURE it will get your trailer up high enough to change the tire. We found out the hard way (with a loaded trailer on a narrow shoulder). Fortunately, the shoulder was such that we could dig out a little bit to get the tires changed. I then sold the Trailer Aid on eBay and bought an aluminum Jiffy Jack (it comes in different sizes/heights):
    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=2e87c5fe-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5&item=10735&ccd=IFH003&utm_source=Goog leShopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_content=10735&adtype =pla&kwd={keyword}&gclid=CN7P85fwq7QCFQeynQodBnoAe w

    ETA: link didn't work - trying again:
    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=2e87c5fe-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5&item=10735&ccd=IFH003&utm_source=Goog leShopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_content=10735&adtype =pla&kwd={keyword}&gclid=CN7P85fwq7QCFQeynQodBnoAe w

    Apparently I can no longer post links here. Sorry, but I guess all interested can still figure it out.
    Equus Keepus Brokus



  9. #29
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,341

    Default

    http://www.hitchupmagazine.com/

    Just a FYI- this is a free online trailer safety and tips magazine from the folks at US Rider.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Posts
    136

    Default

    This got me thinking.... If I have AAA, will they be any help in a horse trailer situation? I totally rely on AAA for all things truck-related (knock on wood so far i've only had to call them for keys locked in the car and that time I miiiiight have run out of gas...whoops!)

    How helpful is AAA for horse trailer things?

    Sorry if I'm hijacking
    ....Leo\'s Mom.....



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    Bonsall, CA- with my horses finally home again!
    Posts
    2,165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wsmoak View Post
    If you have a drive-on trailer aid, check that it actually lifts the second tire high enough off the ground when the trailer is loaded. There are different heights available. A friend of mine had one of the small black plastic ones, and we *had* to unload the horses to get the flat tire off.
    I had this same problem. I was pulling a fully-loaded 3H by myself (well, mostly by myself- I had 2 teenage girls with me who were no help at all, LOL!) when a tire on the shoulder-side blew. Managed to get the trailer up on the Trailer-Aid after only one or two tries, but then was completely taken aback when the flat was still resting too heavily on the ground for me to change it! But then I had the bright idea to use the jack to jack the trailer up just a few more inches so that the good tire was still solid on the Trailer Aid, but the flat was suspended and I could change it.

    I had to leave the horses on as we were on an 8-lane highway (I-15 out of San Diego), and there was a narrow shoulder with a steep dropoff. I am sure having the trailer full with 3 horses is why the flat was still sitting on the ground, even with the TrailerAid.

    Did I mention I was 7 months pregnant at the time? Good times!
    ~Living the life I imagined~



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,303

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo86 View Post
    This got me thinking.... If I have AAA, will they be any help in a horse trailer situation? I totally rely on AAA for all things truck-related (knock on wood so far i've only had to call them for keys locked in the car and that time I miiiiight have run out of gas...whoops!)

    How helpful is AAA for horse trailer things?

    Sorry if I'm hijacking
    There have been several threads on this subject ...

    Live animals seems to be the line that AAA will not cross, even with their RV plan.

    Suffice to say, I have USrider. They answer the call with "Are you and your horses safe ?"

    Anybody have AAA help with a trailer with horse/s ?



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,098

    Default

    As an aside, don't forget to keep a stock of flares in your truck. A truck and trailer take up a lot of room on a roadside, and I don't wanna get hit whether I'm on the side of a highway or on a curvy country road. Step #1 of tire changing: light your flares! (Unless you are lucky enough to be in a parking lot.)



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,764

    Default

    I had AAA and USR. I got stuck 1/2 a mile from home, leaving very late one night, by myself, freakin' cold windy night, with an injured horse on the way to NSCU. Truck tire blew

    After calls to both, and over an hour later, USR finally called back and said they were unable to find someone

    AAA said someone would come out.

    AAA said it was a good thing it was a front truck tire and not a rear one as they wouldn't have been able to help me

    Yes, I'm quite capable of changing a tire by myself, IF I can get the lug nuts off. As it was, it took the (very, very large) AAA guy AND the HP (who came because I told AAA I wasn't able to get off the road, there was nowhere to go) huffing and puffing to get the nuts off. I have no idea why they were so tight

    So no, if it had been the trailer, or the rear truck tire, I'd have been in deep diddly do. I was SO disappointed in USR
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,596

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    A policeman friend of mine advised me to call the police and tell them if I was on the side of the road with the trailer. He said they'd send a car out to sit behind with lights on so that the trailer is more protected.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2008
    Posts
    472

    Default

    I had USRider, my trailer tire blew up, and USRider could not find anyone to help me, even when I explained to them all I needed was the correct size lug wrench. I was driving a friend's truck instead of my vehicle and didn't realize her wrench was not a metric size one like mine. I had a trailer aid, was capable of changing tire myself if only had the right wrench. One hour later, I gave up on USRider and called the police. Five minutes later a very nice officer parked his car behind me with lights on, brought a metric size lug wrench AND changed the tire for me. I ditched my USRider membership after that.
    ___________________________________________
    "Another member of the Barefoot Eventers Clique"



  17. #37
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2006
    Posts
    94

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    AAA (depending on where you are) will send a man with a big wrecker and tools to do the job. They won't bill AAA, but cash, check, or credit card usually works. Very few men would drive off and leave a woman and a loaded horse trailer on the side of the road. I "neglected" to tell them that the flat was on the trailer. I had tools to do the job but could NOT break those lug nuts loose.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    326

    Thumbs up Telescoping Lug Wrench with set of Reversible Sockets!

    There have been several responses here where folks have been unable to break loose the lug nuts on their wheels.

    I wonder what kind of lug wrench you travel with?

    Just a suggestion: I have a Gorilla telescoping lug wrench - it extends to 21" long to give you extra LEVERAGE to put force on those lugs to get them loose. Get one from Amazon or Wal-Mart.

    It also comes with a full set of sockets to fit different lugs!

    I *always* trailer with that lug wrench and my Trailer Aid. For bigger rigs, (3H and up) I have heard that the Jiffy Jacks are better than the Trailer Aid, fwiw.

    Also, as been already suggested, practice at home!



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
    Posts
    2,215

    Default

    I've never had an issue with US Rider letting me down. I use them for non-horse related emergencies as well. They helped out when I had a van full of dogs too.

    I dropped AAA when they would not change a tire on my UNLOADED horse trailer (with RV plan) or a wheel on my dually.
    The rebel in the grey shirt



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    1,800

    Default

    I just wanted to add to those that said:

    YES WITH A TRAILER AID


    My Trailer Aid has saved my hide many times. I've had to change a blown tire FOUR TIMES with the horses loaded (2 horses in a 3 horse stock/slant gooseneck combo)

    LOVE MY TRAILER AID USRyder or not - learn how to change your own tire and always have a good spare. I've learned my lesson!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
    www.elainehickman.com
    **Morgans Do It All**



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