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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2008
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    Landlocked in Western Mass.
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    283

    Default Trailer flat tire w/ horses aboard?

    Silly question, perhaps, but if I'm travelling (alone) with my 2 horses, and I get a flat on the trailer, is it safe to keep the horses in the trailer while I back the trailer onto the little 'trailer-aid' ramp to fix the flat? Does it matter if it's a gooseneck or bumper-pull?
    Whatever you do, or dream you can, begin it; Boldness has genius, magic, and power in it ~ Goethe



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,778

    Default

    No simple, "school" answer, here.

    Are you on the side of the interstate with a wide, paved shoulder or on a country road in the mountains with no shoulder? How well trained are your horses? Is the "trailer aid" rated for the loaded weight of the trailer? Is it day or night? Do you have proper road side assistance (like USRider)? The list could go on.

    My preference would be to keep the horses loaded unless absolutely necessary to unload them. Keeping them in means you don't have to worry about them as you deal with the tire problem.

    The best advice I can give: buy USRider coverage and let them deal with the problem.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2003
    Location
    Orlean, Virginia
    Posts
    2,959

    Thumbs up jmho!

    No problemo! Those ramp aid things really work I gotta say!
    Even if the horse moves around some; it stays put. DO NOT unload your horse imho!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2012
    Location
    Coastal NC
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    979

    Default

    In a perfect world, I am sure it would be best to remove the horses, but the side of any road is not a perfect world. We leave them in and use the trailer aid.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,755

    Default

    Even having US Rider, you are not guaranteed they can get someone to help you

    All else equal, yes, the Trailer Aid can be used with the horses on board. It's not that much of a tilt to the trailer. Just get to the safest place you can first
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
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    5,057

    Default

    Question: if you are alone, how would you unload horses, and then back or drive trailer onto trailer-aid? Who is going to hold the horses while you do this? You cannot tie them to the trailer, and then back it onto the ramp.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,292

    Default

    Trailer Aid is safer than using a jack, that trailer might fall off of. Jack will only have a small lifting area, smaller base of support, maybe a small, correct (safe) lift point to put jack under for lift. Moving horses inside trailer, semi truck drafts hitting trailer, all combine to add "motion" to the trailer up in the air. VERY easy for jack to fall over with all that going against it. You only need to get the wheel off the ground enough to pull wheel off and put the spare on. So lift only needs to be an inch with all tire weight on the second half of the tandem tire.

    Having changed tires using a jack and a trailer aid, I MUCH prefer using the trailer aid under the trailer. Less work to get the wheel up, more secure in that up position.

    It is NO FUN changing tires under a loaded trailer, even with a good wide shoulder to pull of onto, on the Interstate, even with a sunny day!!

    Keep the air pressure correct for the tires, check it often, so the tires can work properly. Tires with correct air pressure saves the sidewalls wearing prematurely or heating up with over-flexing, gives you better gas mileage.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Have had to change it twice with a horse in it and it worked just fine. Be sure to loosen the lug nuts before you drive the trailer on to it. US Rider is great, but this was a much faster fix.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,296

    Default

    I'll assume you have a trailer-aid. The trailer-aid is the best for changing a tire loaded with horses. I have changed several tires using it. (Fully loaded 3 horse)

    First pull to a level spot with room to work. Drive slowly. Don't worry if the flat tire is damaged. Your safety is more important than a tire with a hole already! Loosen the lug nuts before anything else. Once the flat tire wheel is in the air you can't loosen the bolts. Put the trailer-aid in front or behind the good tire (this will depend on location of the flat) Because you're alone. One can't tell when the wheel is properly positioned on the trailer-aid.. leave the driver's door open. Sight along the bottom door frame to the ground. (look for a rock or such as a fixed point) Then back or drive forward 18 inches. Set the E-brake hard and transmission in park. Go look at the wheel on the trailer-aid. Adjust as needed. remember to set brake & transmission again.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,343

    Default

    What hosspuller said. We've changed a tire on the side of I-65, loaded with three horses. And I have US Rider but I wasn't about to sit there, hoping we didn't get it, with traffic roaring past going 70+ MPH.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Keep 'em on board. There's really no place for the trailer to go with four wheels, given only one is flat. Hardest thing that you will do will be to back the trailer onto the correct place on the Trailer-aid chock while alone. Worth it to find a nice flat place on the highway that lets you pull right off(at least the truck/trailer width again away from the breakdown lane). You really cannot be far enough away from the highway edge. Just pay attention that the trailer wheel you are putting on is right side out(yes I have found our trailer with a wheel on backwards). Unless you are truly OCD and check daily, recheck your spare's tire pressure after you have mounted it at the nearest garage.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    6,637

    Default

    The Trailer Aid is designed to be used with the horses on board. Back up (or drive forward, depending on front or back tire) slowly and you should feel a very slight dip as the wheel settles into the well of the Trailer Aid. Make SURE to block one of the wheels. As said, loosen the lug nuts first. Change the tire (the hardest part - trailer tires are heavy), hand tighten the lug nuts, drive off the Trailer Aid and tighten the lug nuts.

    One thing not mentioned is that normally road service people won't touch a horse trailer because they have to find and bring out a hydraulic jack. If you have a regular road service, just call and tell them you have a flat tire. When they get there, bring out the Trailer Aid and have them guide you up onto it and let them change the tire. Works great! Ask me how I know.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!


    4 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    3,497

    Default

    Been there done that with a 28' gooseneck. No problem.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
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    2,296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    What hosspuller said. We've changed a tire on the side of I-65, loaded with three horses. And I have US Rider but I wasn't about to sit there, hoping we didn't get it, with traffic roaring past going 70+ MPH.
    I have USRider. But for a flat, instead of waiting, I can using the trailer-aid be changed & on the road in less than 15 minutes. Road service will take longer than that just to get to you.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2007
    Location
    Chestertown,MD
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Trailer aid is a wonderful thing!
    Pao Lin



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
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    1,911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hosspuller View Post
    First pull to a level spot with room to work. Drive slowly. Don't worry if the flat tire is damaged. Your safety is more important than a tire with a hole already!
    HOWEVER... if you've had a blowout and there are pieces of tire flopping about, it is possible that one of those pieces will hit and damage the valve stem on the good tire, leaving you with TWO flats. That was not a fun day. The trailer now sports two spares.

    While I'm not advocating changing a tire in the middle of a traffic lane, you're probably safe enough pulled over on the side of the freeway vs. trying to get to the next exit.

    If you have a drive-on trailer aid, check that it actually lifts the second tire high enough off the ground when the trailer is loaded. There are different heights available. A friend of mine had one of the small black plastic ones, and we *had* to unload the horses to get the flat tire off.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2010
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    225

    Default

    Make sure you not only have a TrailAid but also a torque wrench (to get the lugs back on with the correct torque), breaker bar (to get the lugs off) AND the correct size attachment for your lugs (it's probably not the same as your truck). I'll also second the suggestion to carry two spares. I've had one flat in my life and of course it was on the trailer, thank goodness for US Rider. Live and learn!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18

    Default

    Been there done that. Yes, trailer aid works well, even the one hubby made. Trailered for over 30 years and I've had 3 blowouts in 1 year.

    Summer 2012 on the side of highway 2 in AB, and it was crazy busy Sunday home traffic. Coach stopped behind us and helped but there was no place to get off the road. Tire got put on backwards. I stopped to retorque and found it and then had to do it all over again but at least in a quiet place. Of course it was scorching hot.

    Next time, I will travel on the blown tire and wreck it rather than risk life on the side of a busy highway.

    Never unloaded the horses when using the trailer aid.

    Nancy!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,065

    Default

    This thread reminds me that one time, on I-75 here in GA, I saw a state patrol officer changing a tyre on a horse trailer. In the middle of summer. With horses on board.

    I sure hope that the owner of those horses send an attaboy letter to GSP headquarters to thank that officer.

    I would not take horses off of a trailer on the side of the road. Too many bad things can happen. I'd leave them on. I have the foamy stuff for tyre leaks, it works unless there is a big cut. And my cousin gave all of us years ago one of those air pumps that works off of the cigar lighter or cell charger. That thing is really great. I pumped up a flat tyre on my truck with the air pump filled that tyre up within a few minutes. I also have AAA, which is great for flat tyre and other automotive issues when traveling.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2008
    Location
    Landlocked in Western Mass.
    Posts
    283

    Default

    Thanks all - good information! And very good to know these things BEFORE I need to know them. I have US Rider and a trailer aid. Didn't know there are different sizes of those... must investigate!
    Whatever you do, or dream you can, begin it; Boldness has genius, magic, and power in it ~ Goethe



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