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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2004
    Location
    central New York State
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    2,847

    Smile Just curious, what are your conditions for letting a young horse go out on trial?

    I am just curious for feedback about anyone's conditions for potentially letting a yet unbroke 3 year old Dutch WB gelding go out on trial. A bit of background: He's a super quiet, very nice flashy upper level jumper prospect. I put him on the ground and how his sire and dam. He could do eventing and dressage as well. This is not a Low level horse. His pedigree alone will make some swoon and he LOVES, LOVES, LOVES to jump and has a very good jump on him-a real natural. His full older brother sold last year to a top eventer.

    He has his ground manners, loads, great in a stall, bathes and some of his ground training-meaning he knows the very basics of lunging (I don't lunge a lot) but has not been ground driving. I start mine later under saddle-as 4+year olds. He's super level headed, a people pleasure and learns quickly. He was a colt until he as nearly 3 1/2 and a quiet one at that. Two weeks after gelding him he was turned out with my mares and a young pony we have and he's low man in that herd-has never tried a thing. Okay you get the picture. Right now I have him priced just below 5 figures.

    I have someone, who does not live that far away from me, a few hours away, who has asked to take him on trial and I am very hesitant-what can't they see here? My other babies have always sold themselves in the first 30 minutes, practically, when buyers come to meet them. I have never let my other ones go out on trial and one horse, not my own but one young one on my farm and the seller agreed to do a trial was seriously injured while out on trial.

    Sure one can sign a "liability waiver" but I could also end up again with a horse who's injured too. I know what my gut is telling me.

    Thoughts Please. Thank you.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,605

    Default

    I would ask them the question you ask here; what is it they want to see at their facility? Do they want to free jump and you lack the facilities? Do they just want to see how he reacts to being off site? Is their training unable to make the trip to go see him in person? Is their vet?

    I would not let an unstarted horse go on trial, but I would consider working with them to address their needs/concerns. For example, I might be willing to haul a horse to their vet for the PPE if that is their prime concern (as long as they pay the hauling either way)
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!


    5 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    2,510

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    Go with your gut. Maybe I'm just ignorant here, but what is the benefit of taking an unbroken horse out on trial? Free jump the crap out of it without the owner watching? Break it really quickly and really badly and then get a horse back thats even harder?

    Again, I'm not that familiar with a situation like that but I don't see the benefit for you (or even for the potential buyer!)


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2011
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    My conditions are the same as going to a Mercedes dealer and asking to take one home on trial. NO! LOL

    I got one of my horses almost for free, because they let him go out on trial to another trainer's barn, and he got seriously injured with a long recovery. I was willing to rehab him, and they didn't want to wait the 9 months for him to recover...so we made a deal. They will never let one go out on trial again.

    Super good insurance policy on him...maybe. Nah. Make them buy him. JMHO


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2012
    Location
    Winterfell, aka New England
    Posts
    44

    Default

    The only reasons I could see the PB requesting a trial on an unbroke horse is so the trainer can screw around with him OR to make sure he isn't on crazy tranquilizers/ other pharmaceuticals (because we all know THOSE sellers ). Either way I would say no!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Horse Heaven
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    There are many threads about this -- and the answers are about the same. Experienced sellers do not let their horses go on trial. Of course, there are exceptions and good outcomes for some. But when things go south - you and your horse are the one's affected. Sometimes tragically and sometimes as a major economic hit.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2004
    Location
    central New York State
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    Thanks folks, I said "no". I have video of him free jumping at my facility plus I also said I would put PB in touch with other owners of my babies. Just wanted validation. I keep track of my babies and have bought two back from big time horse people b/c even after the sale they were literally running them into the ground. Thank you so very much! I love the Mercedes comment.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    15,965

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    I would say "no" to a trial on an unbroke horse. Under the right conditions I would agree to trailer him to a facility for them to free jump/evaluate him but only if I as the seller was able to be present and involved. I think you made the right decision.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2002
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,151

    Default

    Fiind out what they want to see and accommodate them under your watch on your property. If they want to see how he does in a new environment, ship him to a mutually agreed upon place and stay with him to set him up for success.

    I honestly can't think of anything a potential buyer needs to see with an unbroken youngster that can't be done with your supervision.

    Good luck!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,089

    Default

    I'm not a big fan of sending horses out on trial to begin with, but even so there really is no legitimate reason to want to take a young horse on trial. At most, you could take the horse to their vet's clinic for a thorough vetting, or to a mutually agreeable location to see it at liberty in an indoor or to see it free jump a little.

    Probably because there's no good reason to do it, taking unbroke three year olds on trial is definitely very unusual in the sport horse industry. With this in mind, I'd be concerned about dealing with a buyer who was asking for something this peculiar. They may not be a serious buyer, they may not know what they are doing, or or they may want to try something they know you wouldn't approve of with the horse before sealing the deal. I also would not ship a three year old out to a trainer not of my choosing or who didn't work 100% for me as part of a sales deal.

    I'd politely say no (as you did) and not worry too much about it. In my experience unusually demanding buyers are not typically serious buyers, they are looking for a reason not to buy.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2012
    Location
    Somewhere down-under
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Same a my rule on all trials. No. Never. Not in a million years! I'm happy for them to come out as many times as they want, or I will happily take the horse to their coach or to a facility somewhere. But as long as the horse is there so am I.

    I have done one trial and that was because I was good friends with the people who owned the place where the horse would be and I knew the place was probably even safer then mine.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
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    Did they said why they needed to trial your young unbroken horse?

    You did the right thing by saying no. I see really no reason for this.
    Last edited by alibi_18; Dec. 16, 2012 at 10:20 PM. Reason: I meant unbroken of course!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
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    2,984

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    Usually I'm in favor of a trial, but in this case I'd say no. If a horse is going well under saddle, and is used to trailer rides, and going to shows, clinics, and such, then a trial might be ok. For a young horse, it's too risky.
    It's 2014. Do you know where your old horse is?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 1999
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    570

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    unbroke?? No trial! They are buying potential. OMG, please don't send out an unbroke for trial. You buy it, or you don't. End of story.
    I train young ones and it doesn't take much to mess them up. I can't think of one good reason for you to agree to this.
    They can come by you to see the horse's personality and work with him under your supervision. It is late tonight and this thread just amazes me that it would even be considered. Sorry.
    I am very protective of my youngsters
    www.easternprospects.com not updated Time for a total rehaul
    www.sherylwilkins.zenfolio.com



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2004
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    central New York State
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    wilkins, I am not considering it, I was just curious, if you had read the OP, what others thought. I am very protective of my young horses and those horses, of any age, that are sent to me for training and/or then sale.

    All of my horses go with a contract, I either visit or get photos of the place where my the horses go and most often we deliver them ourselves. I also tell them "I will be following up to make sure they are okay etc". I feel responsible fo my horses as I brought them into the world.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
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    4,567

    Default

    No way would I ever let an unbroke youngster go out on trial.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,422

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    Like the others have all said...NO WAY in the world I would send ANY, let alone an unbroken horse to anyone on this planet!!! Nadda!! There is nothing they will see at their farm, they can't see at yours.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2005
    Posts
    3,891

    Default

    No way. Why?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2009
    Location
    Mission,B.C
    Posts
    721

    Default

    i agree with rel6..what is the benefit of trialing a unbroke horse?
    i wouldn't trial a youngster either.
    for me if there is to be any trial at all,the horse must stay at my place ,made or unbroke
    just IMOE



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