The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910 LastLast
Results 141 to 160 of 185
  1. #141
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    25,163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PonyPenny View Post
    I remember reading the Little House Books with my daughter and in one book, I Believe "Little Town on the Prairie", it tells of Willie Olsen and how he would go blank and not answer questions in school. His sister Nellie said "That is my brother Willie. He can't answer questions, they confuse him." Finally one teacher had enough and took him in the back and whipped him. When he came out to the classroom, one look from the teacher took away much of his blank stare and drooling. I know this book is somewhat fact and fiction and certainly whipping is not the way to handle problems, but I have to wonder if all this coddling and not making kids responsible for their own behavior is part of the problem. It seems once we give kids a label, it it like they are no longer responsible for their behavior, nor are the parents.
    Well there we go, let's beat kids who, most likely from the description, are suffering from petite mal seizures. There's a plan.

    I'm dyslexic...would a good beating have helped me?
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/


    6 members found this post helpful.

  2. #142
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    Now I'm not saying this Anarchist Soccer Mom isn't describing a real painful and difficult situation - I am just having a hard time believing this article is not another well executed novel writing... Folks, read the article, carefully, and tell me you are really convinced that the author is really writing her own experience. To her credit though, that was one heck of good writing - I would like to shake hands with this writer myself.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #143
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    5,345

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Well there we go, let's beat kids who, most likely from the description, are suffering from petite mal seizures. There's a plan.
    Agree this sounds very much like a petite mal seizure, which most would not recognize at all. I know only because of one friend who suffered with this. We were the last in the college dining hall because, tension from crowds could cause the seizures.
    The teacher followed the accepted procedure of the times. Fortunately we have more knowledge and hopefully treat out children better. In other words know when kids are misbehaving as opposed to dealing with a physical/medical problem.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #144
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OneGrayPony View Post
    I read back through her blog and I don't believe that. I think she's a very expressive writer, who has a lot going on. I do think that some things are exaggerated for affect, which would be true for most writers. The negative attention given to her blog right now, IMO, is unwarranted. I highly doubt that she even thought she would GET that much attention. Blogosphere is pretty crowded and she seems to be a smart cookie.
    I've got 50 acres of swampland for you to buy too.

    After reading her blog I'm pretty sure SHE's the one that needs medication.

    And no, it's not just her overly famous blog post, which was VERY much titled to get attention. I'm just saying to everyone else, read the rest of her blog before spouting off at me.

    Sure, I could be wrong. It's just an impression I have, but that blog post and the rest of her blog doesn't add up for squat.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #145
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    4,162

    Default

    I used to work in an Urgent Care. Parents would sometimes bring their out of control kids in and beg for treatment because the kids were attacking them. It would take a couple of hours of my calling the local psych hospitals before I could get them briefly hospitalized. Many of the parents only got help through the police and the juvenile justice system. Even then, it was hard to get the kids detained for very long. We need some sort of system for treating these kids, and more importantly, protecting society.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #146
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2000
    Location
    Chatham, NY USA
    Posts
    4,100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CDE Driver View Post
    This is an honest question, please don't scream at me... but why are SO many boys/young men mentally ill? Was it always this way and it just wasn't identified? Are humans that flawed that so many of us are mentally ill?

    Truly, this is a frightening concept to me.
    A friend sent me a few articles/videos over the weekend - all discussing the prescribing of psychotropic drugs - which is one MAJOR change in the past few decades. These articles and one YouTube which included interviews mental health professionals and statistics relating these mass murders with said drugs were terrifying. American dependence on drugs (whether they be antibiotics for the first sniffle to psychotropics for lack of discipline or whatever) is out of control - making pharmaceutical companies who make them and the doctors who prescribe them millions of dollars, while being FULLY AWARE of the REAL dangers (aka side effects).

    Carol
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #147
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    12,084

    Default

    When I was younger, the local educational system mandated that students be medicated if they met certain criteria. It was not pleasant for me because I was put on medications that did cause a lot of problems, both physical and emotional.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  8. #148
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,801

    Default

    I do think that life has changed, and so many formerly outlet behaviors for males are no longer acceptable. That's probably a whole 'nother thread, but schools anymore are no place for boys, at least at the elementary level.

    Sorry you had to go through that, Lex.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #149
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    5,041

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    When I was younger, the local educational system mandated that students be medicated if they met certain criteria. It was not pleasant for me because I was put on medications that did cause a lot of problems, both physical and emotional.
    Lex, if you were my child I would have found another school and stated my opinion to the administrators. We have been requested to consider medication for my son's lack of attention, we have declined. Part of it is just being a boy and if it is not hockey, legos,or mindcraft, well it is just not that interesting for him. We are working with him but with his growth spurt I cannot medicate him especially right now.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #150
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    12,084

    Default

    I was just an energetic kid like any other and I had a minor speech impediment so I got dumped into the Special Education system to get help with that and from there they tacked on ADHD - to which they attached mandatory daily supervised medication and periodic evaluation or removal from school - to keep me in the system so they could get Federal funding of which there was a lot coming into the county because of the proximity to DC.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  11. #151
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    11,265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    From a blog posted on facebook:

    http://anarchistsoccermom.blogspot.com/2012/12/thinking-unthinkable.html

    Thinking the Unthinkable


    In the wake of another horrific national tragedy, it’s easy to talk about guns. But it’s time to talk about mental illness.

    Three days before 20 year-old Adam Lanza killed his mother, then opened fire on a classroom full of Connecticut kindergartners, my 13-year old son Michael (name changed) missed his bus because he was wearing the wrong color pants.

    What can we do, as a country and as individual citizens to fix this? Clearly our mental health system is broken.
    For the record, as of today there is not one shred of evidence that Lanza was mentally ill; socially awkward yes; weird, yes. To date, no official has said he was diagnosed with Aspergers. It was only his Mother saying so. The actions that have been shared by the police so far, that he took prior to committing the crime do not appear to be the actions of someone not capable of knowing right from wrong. Lanza may end up earning a spot on the list of Americans most gruesome mass killers, an evil criminal and nothing more.

    The gal in the blog has a child with big issues. We don't know about Lanza yet and given how MANY errors the media reported the day of the shooting- Lanza killed his father, the brothers girl friend was missing, his Mother was killed at the school in the kindergarten class where she worked- it will take time for informed heads to share accurate information. Our media was an embarrassment on that horrible day.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  12. #152
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2010
    Location
    Texarkana, AR
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    Fooler has it right. Back in the day, the mentally ill, mentally retarded and pretty much anyone else who was "off" were warehoused in mental institutions in some cases in pretty horrendous conditions. JFK had a mentally retarded sister who was housed in an institution because families didn't want to admit they had such relatives. JFK began the movement to house the mentally ill, retarded etc. in the "least restrictive environment". There was also the civil rights movement which made our society more aware of the rights of people who were "different" and then there was the development of psychotropic drugs that made certain mental illnesses manageable. So the idea was, instead of institutionalizing these folks we would have community based providers that could take care of them in there homes. Problem is the mentally ill and mentally retarded don't have much political clout so these programs were never fully funded, never funded at all or funding was cut. So the system simply doesn't function and these folks fall through the cracks until they commit a crime and then they are imprisoned. Prison just gets them off the streets for a while and does little to nothing in the way of treatment or deterence.

    Many forms of mental illness can be controlled by psychotropic drugs. Trouble is many of these drugs have some unpleasant side effects so people don't like to take them. Bi-polar people, for example, like the rush they get when they are in their manic phase so they often self medicate with illegal drugs like meth to simulate that high. In an ideal world, we would have a mental health system with enough social workers to follow the diagnosed mentally ill and ensure they are getting and taking their meds and are getting adequate counseling. In some cases this might mean some sort of mandantory residential facility, not necessarily a lock down, but a place where the mentally ill could be monitored and looked after. I think this would go a long way to solving the homeless problem and would cut down on a number of crimes.

    Then there are the people who are just too sick to function on their own at all. The folks that are dangerous. These people need to be housed, in a lock down, for the protection of society and themselves. They need to be somewhere where they can be forced to take their meds and receive treatment. So I do think there needs to be a return to the "insane asylum" in certain cases.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #153
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    7,806

    Default

    I can't believe that ANYONE would be so clueless as to believe that beating/spanking mentally ill children would somehow "help" them. Spanking doesn't help mentally normal children learn self-control or boundaries- quite the opposite. You take someone who is mentally abnormal, which means they don't react normally to social/environmental stimuli, and punish them with violence, what you expect they might learn? possibly nothing, but most likely they just learn what "normal" children learn from spanking- that violence towards other people is acceptable and normal. You just taught your kid that if you don't like how someone is behaving, the acceptable response is to beat/hit/spank/kill. Kids learn from your example. Violence begets violence. There are probably far more incidents of violence in society that are caused by parents beating their kids than there are incidents caused by mental illness.

    and the worst of the mental illnesses, in many ways, is psychopathy- if you read that article someone posted early on, you learn that one key aspect of psychopathy is the children don't respond to negative consequences. They really don't care what you think of them, or what you do to them, including spanking. They are untrainable by punishment- however, they clearly respond to positive reinforcement, rapidly learning how to manipulate people in order to GET WHAT THEY WANT. Positive reinforcement. Perhaps they could be trained to be non-violent, to pretend to have empathy, to behave normally, by using some kind of systematic positive reinforcement system?

    beating a child with autism, including asperger's syndrome, is abusive. I hope the person bragging about how she abused her child realizes this. Current treatments for children with these disorders certainly do NOT include beatings.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #154
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Ah, well, wendy I am that person and the "abused" child was never beaten. Wish I could get to that eye rolling icon on my Ipad but I cannot.

    For all the should nots, I am happy to report to you naysayers, the child has turned out pretty great. Instead of hiding the knives and fearing for my life and that of my other child, tonight I will pick him up from wrestling practice and we will have a nice dinner together. As they say, the proof is in the tasting of the pudding.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #155
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Posts
    248

    Default

    I hope every one of you who has posted as if you know what you're talking about is raising or has raised a child with special needs. Any kind of special needs. No, not just a child who has exhibited psychopathic or sociopathic behaviors but any kind of disability (aspergers, ADHD, dyslexia, PDD/NOS, RAD, etc). Because ONLY then can you know of what you speak. I didn't agree with EqTrainer for the first couple of posts but then I read more and understood better where she was coming from and her experience. The key there is her EXPERIENCE.

    Some of you act as if there are two options open to these caregivers (lock em up or play the victim you selfish lazy bitches) Give me a break. How about we actually start offering mental health care to these kids. I'm talking about making it easier to get mental health care for your 4 year old when he's diagnosed. How about that, eh?? Everything from social skills groups to OT, PT, therapists. You people who aren't dealing with this have NO IDEA.
    Audaces fortuna iuvat.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #156
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    25,163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    Agree this sounds very much like a petite mal seizure, which most would not recognize at all. I know only because of one friend who suffered with this. We were the last in the college dining hall because, tension from crowds could cause the seizures.
    The teacher followed the accepted procedure of the times. Fortunately we have more knowledge and hopefully treat out children better. In other words know when kids are misbehaving as opposed to dealing with a physical/medical problem.
    I recognize them because my younger sister had them.
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/



  17. #157
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    25,163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Ah, well, wendy I am that person and the "abused" child was never beaten. Wish I could get to that eye rolling icon on my Ipad but I cannot.

    For all the should nots, I am happy to report to you naysayers, the child has turned out pretty great. Instead of hiding the knives and fearing for my life and that of my other child, tonight I will pick him up from wrestling practice and we will have a nice dinner together. As they say, the proof is in the tasting of the pudding.
    You know EqTrainer, I don't believe in spanking, I believe violence begets violence, and I believe that parents spank (for the most part) because they don't have the skill set to try something else. But, that's just my opinion and it may very well be wrong. But before you pat yourself on your back about how your parenting skills prevented something worse, just know that 1) you don't know what the cause and effect is, and 2) perhaps your son would have never become violent at all. Spankings and stringent rules do not prevent schizophrenia, depression or sociopath personalities. So instead of patting yourself on the back, you should thank God, the flying spaghetti monster or fate that you and your son dodged the bullet.

    I worked with special needs kids. Every day. I cried with some of the parents when their low functioning autistic children became too big and too dangerous to handle at home and had to be institutionalized. I rejoiced with them when their children made a small step of progress. So, trust me, I get it.

    And yes, we need early intervention, we need better mental health care. We need doctors not to blow off parent's concerns when their child is just not progressing or begins to regress. Let's not talk about, write your state senator and representative. Call your congressman and senator. Let the President know that we want to fix this!
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #158
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JLD View Post
    I hope every one of you who has posted as if you know what you're talking about is raising or has raised a child with special needs. Any kind of special needs. No, not just a child who has exhibited psychopathic or sociopathic behaviors but any kind of disability (aspergers, ADHD, dyslexia, PDD/NOS, RAD, etc). Because ONLY then can you know of what you speak. I didn't agree with EqTrainer for the first couple of posts but then I read more and understood better where she was coming from and her experience. The key there is her EXPERIENCE.

    Some of you act as if there are two options open to these caregivers (lock em up or play the victim you selfish lazy bitches) Give me a break. How about we actually start offering mental health care to these kids. I'm talking about making it easier to get mental health care for your 4 year old when he's diagnosed. How about that, eh?? Everything from social skills groups to OT, PT, therapists. You people who aren't dealing with this have NO IDEA.
    Thank you. When Stolen Virtue said her son had a bunch of time outs one morning I knew she and I were not talking about the same type of behaviour at all. My son did not do time outs. He would not accept it, he would not do it, he would not sit there or stand there. When you watch those Nanny shows and they nicely march the child back there when they decline to time out? I would watch with my mouth open, catching flies, because I could not imagine how cool that would be.

    My son *had* mental health care at four. He went to a play therapist 3x a week. He had a brief stint in preschool and their answer was to isolate him (which FWIW IMO creates a false safe because the child cannot harm anyone but he is also learning that it feels ok to be lonely - not something I wanted to reinforce) so that was a no-go. But what I want to point out and emphasize is that it was a non-stop effort. When I wasnt dealing with him I was researching how to deal with him. i didnt get to go to therapy myself, until much later LOL.

    Something both FG and I brought up is that we see other kids like ours every day in their schools and the apathy displayed by their parents is scary. The diagnosis becomes the excuse for all bad behaviours. The meds arent going to teach kids how to get along in the world, only the parents can do that. There is only so much therapy and meds can do for a kid. I dont know what the social answer for that is.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  19. #159
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    You know EqTrainer, I don't believe in spanking, I believe violence begets violence, and I believe that parents spank (for the most part) because they don't have the skill set to try something else. But, that's just my opinion and it may very well be wrong. But before you pat yourself on your back about how your parenting skills prevented something worse, just know that 1) you don't know what the cause and effect is, and 2) perhaps your son would have never become violent at all. Spankings and stringent rules do not prevent schizophrenia, depression or sociopath personalities. So instead of patting yourself on the back, you should thank God, the flying spaghetti monster or fate that you and your son dodged the bullet.

    I worked with special needs kids. Every day. I cried with some of the parents when their low functioning autistic children became too big and too dangerous to handle at home and had to be institutionalized. I rejoiced with them when their children made a small step of progress. So, trust me, I get it.

    And yes, we need early intervention, we need better mental health care. We need doctors not to blow off parent's concerns when their child is just not progressing or begins to regress. Let's not talk about, write your state senator and representative. Call your congressman and senator. Let the President know that we want to fix this!
    I am hardly patting myself on the back, what I am trying to convey is the relentlessness that caring for a child like this requires. And dont think for one moment that I assume its all over.. I am in it for the rest of his life. I hope he continues to do well but believe me.. I am vigilant. And FWIW Laura he was violent. But I am not here to debate you on that.

    I know people dont like to hear that he got spanked and it didnt ruin him. It throws their beliefs on there side. I am sorry that you cant get your head around it but it is what it is. Now I am going to go pick him up and have some fun with him.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #160
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,265

    Default

    I have just finished reading an article written by a retired FBI profiler. She, and another FBI profiler I saw interviewed on TV have both said to take mental illness off of the table in the Lanza case. They feel this was well planned out well ahead of the event, that there was no snapping here, and that he took care to kill anyone who could get in his way, thereby securing his path to destruction both at home and through the school. They have both said not to use mental illness as an excuse or a blame in this case. It doesn't fit. The planning here probably took him months.

    That said, I agree the state of mental health in this country needs a complete overhaul.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. The stigma of mental illness...
    By fargonefarm in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: Dec. 18, 2012, 01:46 PM
  2. Violence in the show world
    By rumorhasit420 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Sep. 8, 2011, 06:08 PM
  3. Untreated EPM horse on Giveaways
    By LauraKY in forum Off Course
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Feb. 20, 2011, 01:16 PM
  4. Can I vent? Mental illness...
    By CosMonster in forum Equestrians with Disabilities
    Replies: 87
    Last Post: Dec. 9, 2010, 09:44 PM
  5. Treated or untreated wood for stalls?
    By dmalbone in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Sep. 5, 2009, 10:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness