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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
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    2,470

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    Whether or not you would be okay with the situation if it was reversed is not relevant, nor is the purchase price of the horse.

    At best it is tacky and at worst it could ruin a sale to a good home. If I had an horse on trial and the owner approached me with this request I would send the horse home. I would be afraid that anyone who would feel this claim was appropriate would also be far too involved in the horse after the sale or feel like they had a right to visit, have input about care, etc.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    3,954

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    The answer is no. If you want to ride the horse call the prospective buyer and tell them you've changed your mind. Then go get the horse and you can ride him every day. Don't let him go on trial again until you're certain you can part with him.
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,903

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    I would be pissed if I spent the time and effort to bring a horse in on trial and then the owner changed their mind and decided to not sell the horse (which doesn' sound like the OPs mindset, so not aimed at OP). I always protect myself with contracts, but even without, I would consider the trial to be a buyer's condition of sale, not the sellers.
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,350

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    If you're having second thoughts about selling, you should make up your mind and act now. Anything else is unfair and unkind (letting the buyer waste board on the horse and grow attached to it.) And yes, you should reimburse them if they paid to vet/ ship the horse etc.

    The only way I would "change my mind" at this point would be if I learned something new and horrifying about the buyer-- they are wanted on criminal charges for abuse or something. And even then I would apologize profusely if not sincerely.

    It's sad that you have to sell your horse, but you made the decision, you advertised it and you sent it out on trial. You have to live with that.

    And hey, maybe they'll send it back anyway



  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,777

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    I don't know where the impression was made that I was flip flopping on a deal or that I was not going to go through with it. I borned him, brought him up, he is trained by me, the girl is a greenish rider, there is no way I would bring the horse home worse off. They have spent no money on him except his feed, either.

    I have his sister to ride, but my daughter is home and it would have been nice to go out together. I finally went to see them eye to eye and they are happy to let me ride, but the weather has to stop snowing/raining for that to happen.

    You are right, again, GaitedGlory - my head is getting round it better each day. We never think anybody else can take care of them as well as we can.
    He is such a good boy, they seem to love him, but I need commitment soon.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,514

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    Isn't the point of a trial so the buyer can decide if they want to buy the horse? If the buyer commits to buying the horse before the trial, what's the point of taking the horse on trial?
    You normally have a deposit and a sale contract before allowing a horse to go out on trial, so a commitment has been made. The "not sure if I like him enough to buy him" people can come to the horse's home barn to ride, a couple times.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,948

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash44 View Post
    You normally have a deposit and a sale contract before allowing a horse to go out on trial, so a commitment has been made. The "not sure if I like him enough to buy him" people can come to the horse's home barn to ride, a couple times.
    And an agreed upon price and sizable deposit. And a vet check already done with results acceptable to the buyer.

    I see the trial period as a time to show the buyer that the horse is as advertized. Not a complete flakey puff in a strange environment, terror to his barn mates or a problem for the barn staff...that type of stuff.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash44 View Post
    It's a little odd that the horse went out without a commitment from the buyer - it's a big risk for the owner. Go see him and give him some carrots, and ask the buyer for a commitment. If they are still waffling, you can always go and get him and take him home with you until they figure out what they want to do. I would not be comfortable letting a horse go out on trial without all the specifics ironed out.
    I agree with Flash. If the the buyers have had the horse for a while with no commitment in sight, I'd be calling and telling them that I either need for them to go ahead and vet and buy the horse, or I'll be picking it up in two days. But I would definitely not want to go and ride it while it's still under their care. Can't have your cake and eat it too, sweetie. That said, neither can the buyer. Both of y'all need to make decisions, and it sounds like said decisions should be sooner than later.

    JMO.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

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    Well, a lengthy trial seems foolish and an invitation for the horse to get hurt and then returned to you, but that's neither here nor there now.

    I would not go ride the horse I have out on trial, no. He's there to be tried, not borrowed back. That's an odd request of a seller, IMO.



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