The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,528

    Default Riding yourhorse on trial

    If your horse was away on a falrly long trial (until after Christmas) would you feel right going to pick him up and trail ride him once or twice? No commitment from the people one way or the other yet.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  2. #2

    Default

    No. Part of the reason for a horse going on trial is to see how it will do in the potential buyer's/their trainer's program. The owner coming in and riding it (and especially taking it off site) interferes with that.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,997



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    18,700

    Default

    Absolutely, positively not.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,528

    Default

    Gee - and I thought I was doing the huge favour by letting them have my horse on trial. I felt slightly uncomfortable - hence the post - but I still feel he is my horse. Ha ha - he may come back home anyway, he's only out on trial. But with Christmas holidays, I'd like to get out a bit.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,771

    Default

    If I had a horse in on trial, I would be OK with the owner asking if they could do this, but i would likely say no. The reasons I would say no is that I have likely already vetted the horse AND signed a contract stating the horse is my responsibility. The risk of having it hurt while being hauled and on an offsite trail ride isn't huge, but it is still there.

    If you wanted the horse to ride, you should not have let it go on trial.
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2011
    Posts
    1,324

    Default

    Eh, I don't see it as a favor letting a horse go on trial. It's a buyer's market. If one seller won't do them that favor well there are plenty others that will. From a seller's perspective, it wouldn't even cross my mind to ask to use a horse I've let go out on trial. From a buyer's perspective I'd be a little annoyed if someone who owned a horse I had on trial wanted to come take it for a couple days. Trial periods are a time for the owner to back off and let the prospective buyer get to know the horse, get a feel of what it would be like owning that particular horse. Something about the seller popping up to not only use the horse but take it off property for a couple days where I have no access to it kind of sh*ts all over that.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8

    Default

    You are doing them a favor by letting the horse go on trial; not everyone would.

    But now he's on trial. He's not your horse to ride right now. If you do ride him/take him offsite, you negate the point of having him on trial in the first place.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,528

    Default

    Interesting perspectives.

    If the roles were reversed, I'd be quite happy to let the seller come by and give him an outing. We are not talking million dollar horses here.

    Ah - he may come home anyway and I already miss him.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2011
    Posts
    1,324

    Default

    If you want to ride him, you want to interrupt the trial and you're already missing him why not just call the prospective buyer and tell them you've changed your mind?

    I'm kind of getting the vibe deep down you really don't want to part with this horse.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,605

    Default

    Go ahead and take him back, if that is what you want. But if your intention is to sell him, let the trial run its course. I assume that there is a contract governing this trial and it would address use of the horse. It should have stipulated that you may want to ride the horse during the trial.

    If you need to get out a bit and ride -- see if someone can lend you a horse. If you lived close to my farm, I'd be happy to lend you a Fjord to ride. I have a few that could do a little winter exercise.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,528

    Default

    You are right - GaitedGlory - - but decisions have to be made.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,574

    Default

    Bring him home, Fox.

    Just bring him home.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
    Posts
    4,587

    Default

    Agree that is sounds like you want to keep your horse. Probably ought to go get him.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2011
    Posts
    1,324

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    You are right - GaitedGlory - - but decisions have to be made.
    Can you find a way to make it work, a way to keep him? I hope you can, it sucks terribly to sell a horse you don't want to part with I know.

    If the decision "has" to be made...sadly it would probably be best to start detaching yourself emotionally now starting with not entertaining the thought of interrupting the trial period. Whether it's "right" or "wrong" aside it might be the best thing for you mentally, to get used to the idea of him not being yours. Ripping the band-aid off and all that.

    I hope you can find a way to keep him if that's what you want but if not I hope he ends up with someone who loves and enjoys him as much as you obviously do.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    4,688

    Default

    If I were the buyer, I would think it was a bit weird for the seller to use the horse during the trial. The trial period would be for *me* to have extended time with the horse to see if I truly thought it would be a good match.

    That would make me think the seller really didn't want to sell. If I had shelled out some non-refundable $$$ for the trial and the owner acted this way, I'd be slightly annoyed, particularly if they decided to take the horse back all of a sudden.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
    Posts
    3,051

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    Interesting perspectives.

    If the roles were reversed, I'd be quite happy to let the seller come by and give him an outing. We are not talking million dollar horses here.

    Ah - he may come home anyway and I already miss him.

    I can bet that if the role were reversed, you would not let the seller rider their horse while you have it in trial.

    You are not thinking straight and understandably miss your horse.

    If you want/need to sell this horse, let it finish the trial without interruption.
    If you want your horse back, go get it.

    Just try not to change your mind too often!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,691

    Default

    Honestly if I had a horse in on trial for a client and the horses owner wanted to come ride it every so often while it was on trial I would tell my client to send the horse back and ask to be rembursed for any expenses vet check shipping etc since the owner obviously does not wish to sell the horse. And that it probably would be one of the situations that if the horse did sell the old owner would always be calling etc and honestly not many people want to deal with that.

    ETA: If you decide you want your horse back and won't sell then IMO you should pay them back for anything they spent on the horse. Vet, shipping, etc. Because it was YOU who decided to nix the sale not them.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,482

    Default

    It's a little odd that the horse went out without a commitment from the buyer - it's a big risk for the owner. Go see him and give him some carrots, and ask the buyer for a commitment. If they are still waffling, you can always go and get him and take him home with you until they figure out what they want to do. I would not be comfortable letting a horse go out on trial without all the specifics ironed out.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,901

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flash44 View Post
    It's a little odd that the horse went out without a commitment from the buyer - it's a big risk for the owner. Go see him and give him some carrots, and ask the buyer for a commitment. If they are still waffling, you can always go and get him and take him home with you until they figure out what they want to do. I would not be comfortable letting a horse go out on trial without all the specifics ironed out.
    Isn't the point of a trial so the buyer can decide if they want to buy the horse? If the buyer commits to buying the horse before the trial, what's the point of taking the horse on trial?


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Trial Underway for Girl Killed in Riding Lesson
    By Mike Matson in forum Off Course
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jun. 6, 2011, 01:01 PM
  2. What to do on a trial
    By Gnomeland in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Nov. 26, 2010, 12:55 PM
  3. When is a trial over?
    By fargaloo in forum Off Course
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Jul. 15, 2010, 12:52 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Apr. 5, 2010, 10:45 AM
  5. going to trial !
    By Tamara in TN in forum Off Course
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Aug. 22, 2009, 08:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness