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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Posts
    4,296

    Default Please don't try to sell me your (kid sport here) (product here) at work.

    Last week, a co-worker came up to me in front of some other co-workers and said, "Hey, will you buy the cookies my daughter is selling?"

    I thought it looked like a Girl Scout cookie order form and I figured it's only $3.50 so I said, "OK, I'll buy a box,"

    She said, "Great! It's actually cookie dough to support junior cheerleading and it's $15 each and she wants cash. Today."

    Ouch. That's one expensive, gross, roll of cookie dough that I don't want or need. From now on, the answer will be, "No, thanks!" I wish people just wouldn't put their co workers on the spot in the first place, though.


    12 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
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    594

    Default

    I prefer when people just put up a notice by the water cooler or in their office or something. IMO, It's also better when people give you a few days' notice...I rarely carry cash.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
    Posts
    513

    Default

    I'm totally with you on not liking it when people sell their kids stuff at work! My general rule of thumb is that if the kid doesn't sell it herself, I don't buy it. When I was a kid, I was incredibly shy. I HATED having to sell stuff and go door to door. Sending my stuff with a parent was not going to happen. So I got out there and walked around the neighborhood and some people bought stuff, probably out of pity for me :lol

    So now I tell adults at my work that story when they ask. I doubt it makes a difference to them but it does cut down on the number of times I'm pestered to buy crap : I might buy cookies or something at the store when at least the kids are asking you, are in their uniforms and are polite.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    Rising Sun, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    5,125

    Default

    I actually had a different experience... my son is 4... I personally hate when people are selling things at work and technically you're not supposed to sell at work... Well... kiddo is in pre-K... and you guessed it... fundraiser... I almost didn't even try to sell, but they actually listed what they were hoping to purchase and 1 item was a defibrillator and I have a FB friend who lost her husband to a heart attack... later determined he had Brugada syndrome and that her two daughters have it. Her story and her fight trying to get defibrillators into the school really moved me. So, I decided I'd make an effort... posted it on FB and ended up having some people who bought things, including a few co-workers... so I take the order in and I had TWO people including my manager ask why I hadn't brought it in to work to sell... they would have bought stuff! I was shocked!
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
    http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
    Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2009
    Location
    NC piedmont
    Posts
    2,151

    Default

    I don't have an issue if the order form is in a communal place with a note saying what the fundraiser is for. I often bought items from students when I was teaching. Most schools and organizations don't allow children to go door-to-door anymore, other than to friends, because of safety reasons, so if they want to sell a lot, they have to come up with other options. Actually, if he fundraiser is a good one, we looked forward to them coming in. The holiday butter braids, Girl Scout cookies, and the Little Caesar pizza kits were all big hits and people looked forward to them coming in. I don' like it when the parent gets in your face, but if they just bring it and leave it, no problem.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2007
    Location
    small town, Ohio
    Posts
    613

    Default

    A lot of us moms around here are so tired of paying ridiculous amounts for cheap quality overpriced crap that we just write a donation check for what we would have spent on stuff we didn't want anyway to the organization.

    Here's a check for $35 (or whatever) and no we don't want any of your junk nor will we pester our friends to buy it. That's probably more than your profit margin on what we might have sold anyway so take the money, be happy, and don't ask us to sell anymore.
    Rhythm the perfect OTTB;Spock the will-be perfect OTTB;Mia the Arab/appendix COTH giveaway


    10 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2005
    Posts
    2,808

    Default

    We just had an article in the local paper...kids who had sold cookie dough and utensils out of catalogs. The school gave the top 69 sellers a ride in a Hummer limo to a pizza lunch. The article quoted one of the kids' parents

    Jenny was the top seller in the first group to make the trip, selling 35 items, thanks to her mother's boyfriend, who took orders at his work.

    Suzy said her father also took a catalog to work, but netted zero sales over two weeks. The last day of the sale Suzy's mom, Betsy, called relatives and bought a few items of her own to help Suzy go from zero to 15, qualifying her daughter for the limo ride and pizza lunch.
    What exactly do the kids get out of this? That your parents will cover your ass so you can Get Stuff?
    It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati


    11 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2012
    Location
    with Alfonso Spagoni, the toreador. NOT in a ticky tacky box!
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Tell them you have allergy issues.

    I can't have gluten or corn, so pretty well sorted on school fund raisers! Don't mind buying decorations tho.

    Had Ibeen cornered as the OP, would have done a flat no.

    CFF



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,345

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IveGotRhythm View Post
    A lot of us moms around here are so tired of paying ridiculous amounts for cheap quality overpriced crap that we just write a donation check for what we would have spent on stuff we didn't want anyway to the organization.

    Here's a check for $35 (or whatever) and no we don't want any of your junk nor will we pester our friends to buy it. That's probably more than your profit margin on what we might have sold anyway so take the money, be happy, and don't ask us to sell anymore.
    Totally with you.

    Which reminds me...

    (You all can rev up the hate machine now. Got enough RPMs?)

    If you hate this fundraising crap for school supplies (since when is a defibrillator this kind of item?), keep that in mind the next time you are voting on issues like property taxes. Those fund schools.

    The moral of the story is that you will pay.... one way or another.

    Just bitching because in case the same people who hate being hit up for charities that pimp out 4-year-olds (or their mommas) also bitch about taxes being too high. You can complain about one or the other, but not both.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    9 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2011
    Posts
    1,129

    Default

    The worst is when you have multiple co-workers selling the same thing at the same time. I work in a decent-sized office and at Girl Scout cookie time I know the order forms are coming. Two of the people that sell for their kids are friends of mine, so I get one box from each of them, but GS cookies aren't cheap and I don't have a lot of spare money. I do feel bad telling the other people no thank you, but what can you do?
    *Wendy* 4.17.73 - 12.20.05


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    3,571

    Default

    Maybe part of it is the size of the company where you work? Honestly I think most people where I work are pretty happy when someone is selling something- esp girl scout cookies or the cheese cake things (apparently we're all suckers for sweets LOL!) but I work with a very small number of colleagues.
    Honestly OP, if I were in your position, I would just say, Oh I thought you meant girl scout cookies, sorry I don't like (want, whatever) that kind. But then again I'm one of those odd women who is perfectly comfortable saying no and meaning it.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    2,936

    Default

    I agree that the kids should be doing the selling and not their parents, but all you really have to say is "no thank you." Next time make sure you ask what they are selling & how much it will be before agreeing too.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    I've had 6(!) kids come to my door in the past 2 weeks or so, selling wreaths, cookies, etc. for one reason or another. I wish that I could purchase something from all of them, but that stuff is getting expensive!

    I agree that the work place is just that, the work place. Perhaps a time could be allotted for those people to bring their children in to do that selling.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,401

    Default

    Just is a training step for the child to expect to obtain the results for doing nothing. Should help prepare them for the nanny state.


    As for workers presenting the opportunity to purchase products to co-workers, often just a form of pressure that borders on extortion


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    32,104

    Default

    I am so damn tired of these things.
    And I am not on the buying end, but the selling one!

    Here is a little side note:
    Most of these fund raiser things don't net the organization more than 25% of the cost of the crap selling.
    You can net closer to 50%, you are GOLDEN!
    But these things are relatively low on the time investment of the organizations doing them.
    You can net a lot more money if you do the work yourself....but it's a LOT of work.

    Then there is the door to door sale....not going to happen much anymore. Too many of these sales (all by now?) require money up front. Not too many people are willing to hand over the cash for something they may or may not see in three weeks. Especially since all that crap is so over priced - and remember, I am in the fundraising business so to speak for two organizations, soon to be roped into a 3rd one!
    Also, there are safety concerns, and many of the kids are so overbooked these days, they can't go around the neighborhood (where they don't know anybody anyhow...).

    I do like to help out the various places.
    I really do, because I understand how tight money is!
    But It sure is grinding when the first request for selling junk lands on your desk at the first day of school!

    Now, the cause is also important. A defibrilator isn't really a vanity object, nor cheap.
    new uniforms for the cheerleaders are not really essential just because the style changed....


    i am all for the option to donate without buying crap: the group gets 100% of the money and I don't have to deal with the purchase!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,616

    Default

    One place where I lived virtually all school organizations made the kids sell things, and classroom supplies were financed that way also. I actually had a couple of kindergarteners come to my door, alone, well after dark selling cheap jewelry. The band kids were the worst. They sold things all year, and I worked with two parents of band kids, and one had three kids in it. I finally just bought things I really wanted, and skipped the rest.

    Where I work now most people have stopped trying. This a result of the fact that technically you aren't allowed to solicit federal government workers, except for the official ones. I think most parents just give it up, and either buy the stuff themselves or relatives do, and there are times allowed where a troop can set up outside local stores, and sell that way.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2000
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    Posts
    1,794

    Default

    It is expressly, as in In Writing, forbidden at my employer. For which I am thankful.

    As the parent of a kid who is now subject to shilling this stuff, I cannot stand it. I'd rather the PTO just tell me what my percentage donation should be & I'll cut a check.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    It is expressly, as in In Writing, forbidden at my employer. For which I am thankful.
    and yes the same at our office, but the owner brought his kid's junk to the office for the twisted arm purchases.... until some one (who shall remain anonymous) placed a copy of the page from the employee handbook that forbade such on the table... that closed another chapter of The Boss Has Entered the Room


    6 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,434

    Default

    My daughter used to have to sell girl scout cookies. I told them I would just write a cheque for whatever number of cookies she needed to sell but I did not want to sell the cookies. I was told that I couldn't do that because it was a necessary learning experience for her to sell the cookies. Good grief.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2010
    Location
    somewhere
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    418

    Default

    When I was in elementary school, the teachers would write on the blackboard the names of students who hadn't sold X amount yet. It was a pretty effective tactic, although a few times mine would stay up there and a teacher would pull me aside and remind me that I hadn't turned in anything yet.



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