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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Fair enough. But apply the standard equally to young and old. And remember, too, that borrowing for education is a rather forced kind of debt. That's in part because college is a hell of a lot more expensive for the current generation than it was for those before and because we have not yet created a viable alternative to launching a successful adult life of earning without a bachelor's degree.

    If young'ns continue to buy more education than they can afford, it's not merely because they are stupid or more entitled than anyone else.
    I agree education is very expensive; I just earned a BS in 2012 and am currently finishing up a Masters. I help run our small automotive business and like everyone else here, live a full life.
    I disagree about a viable alternative to a degree. Many trade occupations pay considerably more than those requiring a degree. And we need skilled trade people badly. The average age of Welders, for example, is 56. Master Plumbers can earn upwards of $200 an hour. I worked as a Locomotive Engineer and earned anywhere from $70,000-$100,000 a year. And if I hadn't been in an accident, I'd still be out there running trains b/c the BS I earned in college won't earn me near that.
    I believe we should put as much emphasis on other career avenues as we do on college. Not only for young men but young women as well.
    "How does it feel to be one of the beautiful people?" Julian Lennon


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #82
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    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    Mr. Heinz and I would also like to thank you for your service.

    He was a baby-faced kid serving (Infantry, USMC) in Iraq just a few years ago. He deploys to Afghanistan in 2014 with the National Guard unit he just joined (still Infantry!), and as long as he comes back - will continue serving as long as they'll let him. He's put in nearly 8 years, signed up as soon as they'd let him. He faces a lot of attitudes at his "real" job like the ones presented here - 40- and 50-somethings shaking fingers at him with "back in my day" and "when I was your age" speeches, railing against young people and their lack of responsibility and sense of entitlement. Telling him he doesn't know, he hasn't lived long enough. He just shakes his head and tells people they do not want to know the things he knows, to see the things he's seen, and carries on. The old guys that come through are the most respectful of the bunch - the ones you see still sporting the USMC hat and a wrinkly old bulldog tattoo sixty years later, American flags plastered all over.

    If I were to choose.... I'd want THIS to be the face of my generation you judge us all by. That young man is an inspiration.
    Thanks for that link, it makes a fellow service member proud to be serving her country.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
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    I haven't read all of the responses, but here is my two cents.

    Yes, I do think there is a big difference between the generations. In my generation (I'm 42), not everyone was a "winner" Kids learned how to deal with disappointment, failure. These days, we can't let kids feel those "horrible" emotions. Therefore, young adults have not learned those coping skills when something doesn't go right in their life. Men tend to have more anger issues than women, so that's why most of these crimes are committed by men.

    Add to that...(Yep, you might think I'm crazy)...let's think about all the crap we put in our bodies...diet soda, alcohol, fast food, drugs (how many gulp down several Red Bulls a day?)...our bodies/brain feel like crap to begin with. I have to tell you, the day I gave all the diet soda and fast food up....I felt SOOO much happier.

    This generation as a whole doesn't exercise....the ones with issues spend most of their time in a room with a video game controller, living in a fantasy world....living as a different character, shooting characters up..etc. When you don't exercise..it affects your brain chemistry.

    Parents..the parents who believe their child can do no wrong and society is picking on them. I have one right now that constantly interrupts my class and won't abide by rules. When I sent mom a letter...a very angry dad jumped on me...saying that I was picking on his kid and his kid has low self esteem and no other teacher in the school has any issue with HIS kid. When I asked the chorus teacher...he started laughing and said.."yeah, um..that kid has a reputation"...but instead of addressing the issue with the kid, the parent blames everyone else.

    So this is my take on why all these young men in America are so angry and have no coping skills.

    When we were that age...there were consequences for bad behavior, you didn't get everything you wanted and you learned how to deal with failure....things this generation as a whole haven't learned how to deal with.


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  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalpal View Post
    I haven't read all of the responses, but here is my two cents.

    Yes, I do think there is a big difference between the generations. In my generation (I'm 42), not everyone was a "winner" Kids learned how to deal with disappointment, failure. These days, we can't let kids feel those "horrible" emotions. Therefore, young adults have not learned those coping skills when something doesn't go right in their life. Men tend to have more anger issues than women, so that's why most of these crimes are committed by men.

    Add to that...(Yep, you might think I'm crazy)...let's think about all the crap we put in our bodies...diet soda, alcohol, fast food, drugs (how many gulp down several Red Bulls a day?)...our bodies/brain feel like crap to begin with. I have to tell you, the day I gave all the diet soda and fast food up....I felt SOOO much happier.

    This generation as a whole doesn't exercise....the ones with issues spend most of their time in a room with a video game controller, living in a fantasy world....living as a different character, shooting characters up..etc. When you don't exercise..it affects your brain chemistry.

    Parents..the parents who believe their child can do no wrong and society is picking on them. I have one right now that constantly interrupts my class and won't abide by rules. When I sent mom a letter...a very angry dad jumped on me...saying that I was picking on his kid and his kid has low self esteem and no other teacher in the school has any issue with HIS kid. When I asked the chorus teacher...he started laughing and said.."yeah, um..that kid has a reputation"...but instead of addressing the issue with the kid, the parent blames everyone else.

    So this is my take on why all these young men in America are so angry and have no coping skills.

    When we were that age...there were consequences for bad behavior, you didn't get everything you wanted and you learned how to deal with failure....things this generation as a whole haven't learned how to deal with.
    Good post!
    "How does it feel to be one of the beautiful people?" Julian Lennon


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  5. #85
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    SNL, apparently you are the poster child for 20 somethings, and are on a pedestal high above the rest of them. Just because you're perfect, doesn't mean that the rest of your generation is. Stereotypes come about for a reason - they are a compilation of one's experiences with a group of similar people.

    the 20somethings in my family are high school dropouts, teen parents and self-described undisciplined slackers. The fault for them lies firmly at the feet of their parents, my cousins, who could never be bothered to require anything of them. So it isn't their (the kids) fault, but they are now responsible for it. Overall my peers have done a pretty crappy job raising kids. What scares me is these 20 somethings who were never taught anything are or will soon be raising children of their own. Those kids to come are just screwed.

    Kathy S. & DALPAL describe my experience as a divison officer in the Navy well. I had some great folks working for me. I also had too many who made excuses and blamed anyone but themselves for failure. None of those had a self esteem problem. Actually, they did - they had too much self esteem. They got way too upset over being disciplined or corrected and took things way to personally. One actually did collect components for a bomb in his shipboard locker. Sadly, his butt wasn't nailed to the wall b/c the senior leadership didn't want to bring attention to it with an inspection team onboard.


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  6. #86
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    SNL is a better representative of 20-somethings than you think. Yes, there are an awful lot of losers out there, but there are in any generation. I'm not sure that you can blame the violence on my generation specifically, as many people have pointed out that the late teens to mid-twenties is the age at which some of the more psychotic mental illnesses start to manifest.

    Oh, and by the way, there were most definitely winners/losers when I was growing up. And on the rare occasion that I was a rotten little twit as a kid, I not only got punished, I got (GASP!) spanked! Hard! But I think I managed to turn out okay


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
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    Aug. 12, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    SNL is a better representative of 20-somethings than you think. Yes, there are an awful lot of losers out there, but there are in any generation.
    I agree. I have not been "20 something" for a long time, as I'm 50, but I know lots of them...as I have two 20 something children of my own and know many of their friends. I also work with quite a few people in their 20s, as I am in IT, where there are lots of younger folks. The vast majority are good, responsible, empathetic people who I enjoy spending time with and who I have respect for.


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  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by red mares View Post
    SNL, apparently you are the poster child for 20 somethings, and are on a pedestal high above the rest of them. Just because you're perfect, doesn't mean that the rest of your generation is.
    I love it when people do this. "Oh, you aren't a criminal, on welfare, or addicted to drugs? You must be so perfect." As if those things are difficult.

    Stereotypes come about for a reason - they are a compilation of one's experiences with a group of similar people.
    And it is generally accepted that stereotypes are offensive to most people.

    the 20somethings in my family are high school dropouts, teen parents and self-described undisciplined slackers. The fault for them lies firmly at the feet of their parents, my cousins, who could never be bothered to require anything of them.
    Sorry your family sucks.

    Honestly, you're just looking to excuse your (and other's) bad behavior. You know you shouldn't make judgements on an entire subset of a population based on limited experiences, but you really want to, so you're using the excuse of "everyone else does it, so why can't I?"

    You, and others like you, are ridiculous. Of course my entire generation isn't perfect. Of course not everyone is a "good person" or a "benefit to society". But that's true across the board - all generations. Applying it wholesale to millenniels is just stupid.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
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    Oct. 20, 2006
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    Is there really any more violence this generation than in previous generations?

    Or are we just more aware of it from twitter, facebook, mass media, etc?

    The other thing I am also wondering is that I heard at one point or another in some sociology class (or something, who knows) that in countries with a large portion of unmarried men in their 20s, violence will rise and often a war erupts, reduces the number of young, unmarried men and it quiets down for a while or insert the appropriate natural disaster, plague, etc and it cuts down a number of people.

    Now, we have wars occurring here, but nothing that has mass casualties like it used to.

    I am wondering if per capita, if the amount of violence is just the same as in the past?

    I am not a soft science person, but I think there are a lot of factors at play...

    Untreated mental illness being one, but certainly more than that as well.


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  10. #90
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    I place some of the blame on this guy:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/16/bu...rath.html?_r=0

    As if growing up in this day and age of disappearing jobs, absent fathers, overwhelmingly violent popular culture and sensory overload weren't enough, this guy is targeting your 8 year olds. He got your teenagers with "Call of Duty: Black Ops," but as the BILLIONS he made off of that weren't enough, he's now targeting your 8 year olds with cute anime figures that wield enormous automatic weapons. The photo accompanying the article shows the happy psychopath (OOPS I mean CEO) standing in front of his cartoon characters with bullets flying behind him. A timely picture, indeed.
    Obviously one man's socially challenged child is another man's cash cow.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
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    Nov. 13, 2007
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    I don't know that there is more violence in the 21 and under generation than in other generations, but I can say that there IS a difference between that group and mine. I'm 31, but am probably a generation or two behind because my grandparents raised me, and my grandmother was raised by HER grandparents. But I digress.

    My brother is 20, and has a serious "it is all about ME" complex. He won't take a job he views as "beneath him" or is manual labor because it "doesn't make him happy" or isn't what he wants to do. He has had a hard life emotionally, our mom died when he was 17, and even though I've always made sure he had a place to live, food, school supplies, clothes, etc., it wasn't easy. My mom made it harder, using what little money she got from gov. support to "buy" the kid with video games and other things he wanted. So even though that had almost no money, he always had everything he wanted. Strange combination.

    After my mom died, I took over. He hadn't finished high school, so I agreed to support him and give him my old car and pay his living expenses until high school was done. So he decided 1 unit per week was plenty, which meant another 2.5 years of high school! When I pushed back, it was all about me not being fair, and it isn't fair that I have a horse and get to go on vacations (hello I work 60 hour weeks!), etc.

    So I cut him off. He called me a horrible person, horrible sister, he doesn't care that I paid all of his bills from 18 to 20 and gave him a car and a laptop (not to mention all of the things I covered starting at around age 5 for him), everything you can imagine.

    The point is I was completely beside myself because I've been trying to make sure he is ok, so at the advice of one of my aunts I saw a therapist. Although he confirmed that my mom had done a lot of emotional damage, he also sat that much of what I had experienced was, in fact, generational and was the topic of several academic research papers. It has to do with the "new extended family." Your family isn't just the close and extended family you interact with face to face, but is now composed of hundreds, maybe thousands, of other through facebook, twitter, etc. "Private" is now plastered across the internet for all to see. From that perspective, it really IS all about them.

    Here is one of the articles - Generation "ME"


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  12. #92
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    Where is the slamming your head into a brick wall emoticon when you need it?
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
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    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
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    Thanks. I needed that.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  15. #95
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathy s. View Post
    I disagree about a viable alternative to a degree. Many trade occupations pay considerably more than those requiring a degree. And we need skilled trade people badly. The average age of Welders, for example, is 56. Master Plumbers can earn upwards of $200 an hour. I worked as a Locomotive Engineer and earned anywhere from $70,000-$100,000 a year. And if I hadn't been in an accident, I'd still be out there running trains b/c the BS I earned in college won't earn me near that.
    I believe we should put as much emphasis on other career avenues as we do on college. Not only for young men but young women as well.
    A few years back, I knew a young man who wanted to become a plumber. But he had no "in" with those 50-something plumbers who need to be replaced, so he couldn't get an apprenticeship. No relative who was a plumber, no relatives working in the building trades at all in fact. And there was no way to learn the trade without that all-important apprenticeship. After being stonewalled for a while, he gave up, and I don't know what happened to him. So the plumbers are doing it to themselves, by having a crony-based system for apprenticeships.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



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