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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
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    Default How much to charge for non-full care care?

    Long story short.... My sister (22) and I (27) have been leasing a small farm and caring for our two horses. She feeds am I feed pm split the rent etc

    Sister has not ridden horse in over a year and I'm starting to have issues with quality of care. Missing feelings, not giving water, not helping with getting hay etc

    Right now we pay $300 for the place and half it. I want to "buy out" her half so she doesn't give care but has to pay me to care for him.

    How much do I charge her?

    They are out 24/7 so there's no stall cleaning. Feeding, hay, water, general care.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
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    Feb. 14, 2012
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    I would say charge her her 'half', so $150. That way neither one of your costs go up. I would, however, do all the legal bits that you have to, so that the farm is in your name and she is paying you board. $150/month sounds reasonable to me. She can provide her own feed, which she was paying for anyways.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  3. #3
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    Default

    But if landlord want $150 per horse and she pays me $150 then I'm feeding and caring for her horse for free. Plus she can not be trusted to provide feed


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Lease is in my name only.



  5. #5
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    So essentially, pasture board? What's the going rate for pasture board in your area? About $250? Charge her the full amount, you pay the landlord.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Mar. 30, 2007
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    I'd say charge her $200-$250 or tell her to find a new home for her horse since she has no use for it anymore and apparently doesn't have enough of an attachment to it to keep up her side of the agreed upon labor of care.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!


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  7. #7
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    Oct. 3, 2007
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    I would charge her half of all the costs: rent, feed, hay, bedding if you use any. It's your sister so whether you want to build in a little extra for gas or the times you need to pay someone to cover for you, that's up to you and how it would affect your relationship.


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  8. #8
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    At the moment she is paying half the costs & (in theory) doing half the work - as she will in future be doing none of the work, you need to figure out what this costs you (eg, gas + car expenses + your time), how much your sister can afford to pay, & then how much she would be willing to pay ...
    Is it worth it to you to subsidize her? - can you afford the costs on your own, would you want to find another "boarder"?

    I agree with LexInVA that sister needs to decide if she really wants to continue owning a horse at all ...



  9. #9
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    Aug. 17, 2004
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    Has the OP talked to her sister? I would think that is the first place to start. How about asking if anything is up in her life given the change in the care she is providing. Maybe she wants out. Maybe something else is up. The best solution would be to have a calm chat about how to resolve the situation. IMO, you'll have a better chance at an amicable solution if you start talking to HER and not to us.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Aug. 24, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    Has the OP talked to her sister? I would think that is the first place to start. How about asking if anything is up in her life given the change in the care she is providing. Maybe she wants out. Maybe something else is up. The best solution would be to have a calm chat about how to resolve the situation. IMO, you'll have a better chance at an amicable solution if you start talking to HER and not to us.
    This. exactly.


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  11. #11
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    I understand now. My apologies. I agree with the other who stated $200-$250... IF she supplies her own grain. If not then I would think more in the $330 range.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    Hay prices can be pretty fluid, so I guess I'd work something out where when you order hay, she pays half. If the horse gets grain or something, she can buy her own. Then decide what your time is worth to you. I think that I'd charge about 250 + hay/grain.

    How are you going to handle vet/farrier?

    I guess I'm with those who said "talk to her". See what she says.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    Has the OP talked to her sister? I would think that is the first place to start. How about asking if anything is up in her life given the change in the care she is providing. Maybe she wants out. Maybe something else is up. The best solution would be to have a calm chat about how to resolve the situation. IMO, you'll have a better chance at an amicable solution if you start talking to HER and not to us.
    Easy... I HAVE talked to her , we live in an apartment together and are close. I've asked her if she'd like me to rehome him but she likes him and wants to keep him she just doesn't have an interest in riding anymore (she was never super motivated). She works two jobs and goes to college and it just doesn't work in her life. I know this and I was asking for advice on PRICING not figuring out my sisters life.


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  14. #14
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    Since you live together and it wouldn't be hard to get the money from her (ie: she doesn't have to mail it, drive it out, etc), I stand by my post. $250/mo, she pays for half of the hay when it's delivered. But I'd make sure she's still willing to help out in a pinch because it can be hard to get out there every day twice a day 365 days a year. I've done it and I'd do it again happily, but it's nice to have some backup if you're down with the flu or whatever.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meredith Clark View Post
    But if landlord want $150 per horse and she pays me $150 then I'm feeding and caring for her horse for free. Plus she can not be trusted to provide feed
    Rates vary so much by location that I couldn't hazard a guess about what you should charge her, but I'd suggest that once you come up with a number, you also consider what would happen if, say, she did not come up with the money for grain/hay... and you are left with a hungry horse that you can either leave in that condition or subsidize. (I base this on the OP's note that her sister cannot be trusted to provide feed; apologies if I have somehow misinterpreted the post.)
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  16. #16
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    I would ask your sister what she thinks is fair.

    "Hey. I'm willing to take over the care for your horse. Obviously this will increase my labor input into the barn by a factor of two. What do you think would be fair for your end of the deal to be?"

    It would be pretty hard for her to argue you should do all this for free.

    Then ask her what she thinks should happen if she doesn't pay you.


    Usually if you can get people to create their own agreement they are much more likely to abide by it, and will probably even offer you more generous terms than you would have asked for in the first place.


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  17. #17
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    As I said before, $200-$250 a month sounds fair to me since you are doing all the work.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post

    It would be pretty hard for her to argue you should do all this for free.
    Have you any sisters? That statement makes me think "No" is the answer to that question.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    Have you any sisters? That statement makes me think "No" is the answer to that question.
    I have three brothers and thus AM a sister and none of the four of us would expect any thing like this to be free. Although we tend to barter rather than outright pay each other.



  20. #20
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    Basically you have to calculate:
    1/2 monthly lease fee
    1/2 feed for month
    + any other expenses (gas, etc)
    + some amount for your time. I would consider how much time it takes and the going rate for pretty cheap labor in your area.

    Generally, as this is your sister, you're looking to cover expenses, not make much profit, so the max would probably be the full lease payment or the going rate for pasture board in your area.

    She may also propose bartering for the labor piece.

    Agree it's important to talk to her - again. Maybe get some rates for pasture board and have a discussion then.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



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