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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2014
    Posts
    3

    Default In search of some advice

    I've been boarding at a facility for 2 years and have recently taken a full time position working around the farm. The original property had 10-11 acres with around 7 pastures, but within the last year we've acquired another 10+ acres but it is only used for trails. I was google searching the facility and came across public information about the agreement to which the owner was allowed to run a business out of the property with the city. In the agreement (before the new acreage was purchased) it was stated that the property would never be allowed to have more than 7 horses on the land.
    Now I don't know much about the legal side about how many horses are allowed per acre. I don't know if it changes state to state or city to city.
    However, the facility is now pushing 30 horses. If the city/state finds out can it be shut down? Should I bring it up to the owner? Or is it none of my business?
    I'm mostly concerned now because the farm is now my employer but I'm really not sure of the severity of the situation.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,868

    Default

    I suspect the owner is well aware of the situation. Also there could be other agreements /variances etc that you don't know about. Beyond that I can't really give advice.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    4,572

    Default

    There are often deed restrictions on property. Often those deed restrictions go back generations. Through those generations, someone wants to do something and goes to the town and gets a varience. For example, the lot is restricted to residential only, and a variance is granted for farm where someone can sell eggs. Often the town has a rule about how many horses can be on a certain acreage. If the deed is not in compliance with the current town ordinance, its easy to get a variance. Old deed rules often are grandfathered in despite new town ordinances; in the same vein, old deed rules are often excepted because of new town ordinances.

    Just because you saw a deed restriction doesn't mean the current owner hasn't gone to town hall and addresed it.
    My warmbloods have actually drunk mulled wine in the past. Not today though. A drunk warmblood is a surly warmblood. - WildandWickedWarmbloods



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    4,572

    Default

    That said, your employer's land issues are outside your job description. I would not go there on your own. If in the future, your employer begins to involve you in that level of her business, you can make polite observations to her, or bring up a concern, but ONLY if its part of what she has made your business. Offer to do research, if she brings up a worry about the town and her business, but until you are part of that aspect of her business, I say butt out.

    Stable workers come and go. If she wants more from you, you will know. Until then, I would not assume or presume you know anything more than she. If you want to keep your job.
    My warmbloods have actually drunk mulled wine in the past. Not today though. A drunk warmblood is a surly warmblood. - WildandWickedWarmbloods


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Green Cove Springs, Fla
    Posts
    5,058

    Default

    I would be concerned if it was my job at stake and if there were variances on the deed, that would be available publicly. Thirty horses on 7 acres is nuts anyway.
    "We, too, will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit." JFK


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Green Cove Springs, Fla
    Posts
    5,058

    Default

    I would be concerned if it was my job at stake and if there were variances on the deed, that would be available publicly. Thirty horses on 7 acres is nuts anyway. But clearly you are stepping above your station! Phooey! You can find out by going to the commissioners office, (or whoever handles land and zoning issues in your area) and find out anonymously.
    "We, too, will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit." JFK



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    I would be concerned if it was my job at stake and if there were variances on the deed, that would be available publicly. Thirty horses on 7 acres is nuts anyway. But clearly you are stepping above your station! Phooey! You can find out by going to the commissioners office, (or whoever handles land and zoning issues in your area) and find out anonymously.
    Yes, but if the op does that she may very well bring about the exact situation she's trying to avoid!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2014
    Posts
    1,723

    Default

    Keep your resume updated.

    But you likely won't have any issues, even if he is violating the deed, unless neighbors get angry.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    Wow, there’s pushing the envelope and then there really pushing the envelope. Most people will look the other way if someone has a few more than the property is zoned/allowed to have. But more than 4 times the limit is something else. Especially on such a small property. I doubt anyone could get a variance to allow more than 4 times the allowed amount. Even with 20 acres.

    All those horses on 10 acres will draw attention at some point. The owner will get a letter at some point saying they are in violation and have X amount of days to comply. If not they will be fined for each day they don’t.

    30 horses on a few acres somebody must have to clean the paddocks daily.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2014
    Location
    Sunshine State. Down Under.
    Posts
    2,363

    Default

    Yes we have that many on low acreage at our riding school, the horses are fed all year round. They are rotated out to a paddock during the day and into a yard at night. It is a lot of work.
    It is better to ride 5 minutes a day than it is to ride 35 minutes on a Sunday.



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