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  1. #21
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    Feb. 11, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by MorganJumper848 View Post
    I weighed the hay last night. Each flake weighs 1.3 pounds. So I am going to say he is only getting around 9 pounds of hay a day. So I need to supplement 3 pounds a day. So I looked at the timothy pellets website, and it says it is a long stem fiber supplement.http://midvalleymillinghaypellets.com/timothy-pellets

    Should I still buy the cubes?
    I added 1 pound of pellets to his morning feeding. I will see how he is this afternoon. I didn't want to add them all at once since i know you are supposed to make feeding changes "gradually".
    He needs a min of 1% of long stem forage (as dry matter). Most horses are happier with around 1.5%. But in a pinch (like a drought) we do what we have to do.

    But since you have to buy long stem forage (AKA-forage subst) get the cubes. Start adding soaked cubes and yes if he is an 1100lb horse he will need at least 3 lbs (dry weight of cubes).

    After that if he needs more you can use forage stretcher pellets such as your hay pellets if you prefer. But your buying cubes anyhow...meh....your choice if you wish to do both.

    Will the barn feed him his soaked cubes on days you are not there?



  2. #22
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    Jan. 14, 2012
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    477

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    I have decided to do 2 things. I added 2 pounds to his morning feed yesterday and he seemed more content when I got there at 2:30. So I am going to keep him at that. I am also going to start going there at 1 so that I can add 1-2 flakes earlier in his day and then ride him at 2. I wanted him to get full turnout until 2 but I figure having him come in 1 hour earlier for food and riding would be a better solution then having him wait until 2pm to eat and then ride at 3(when he is cranky).



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2009
    Posts
    552

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    The worst thing we do to our horses is meal feed. They were designed to eat all day. They were also not designed to eat grains. All of this is a major cause of ulcers as well as other bad things!

    Great site BY A VET www. Squaremealfeeds.com

    This guy references real studies not conducted by grain companies.

    FEED MORE HAY NOT MORE GRAIN.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2010
    Posts
    637

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    Some hay pellets are meant to be used as a hay substitute. While not ideal, it can be an adequate substitute for forage.

    When my gelding had a molar pulled, the vet said no hay for a month! He ate a soaked "complete feed" twice a day for a month. Yes, he was a little annoyed, because he would eat it quickly and then was bored for the rest of the day, but he survived. He didn't drop any weight, and he was not overly stressed.

    Think about all the senior horses that can't eat hay at all and live on pellets.

    Find an un-sweetened hay pellet or a complete feed to supplement the hay.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Western Washington
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    2,954

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    Is he turned out or stalled individually? If so, perhaps you can put your hay in a small hole hay net. It would give him something to do, nearly eliminate hay waste and stretch out his hay eating time. Lot of barns don't like hay nets, but I have found the barn staff is willing to hang them if I keep them filled.



  6. #26
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    Jan. 14, 2012
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    477

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    Quote Originally Posted by stryder View Post
    Is he turned out or stalled individually? If so, perhaps you can put your hay in a small hole hay net. It would give him something to do, nearly eliminate hay waste and stretch out his hay eating time. Lot of barns don't like hay nets, but I have found the barn staff is willing to hang them if I keep them filled.
    He is turned out in a group of 4 so I can't do that. They aren't willing to throw more hay out there because the rest of the horses are ponies(under 14 hands). So that is why I have resorted to hay pellets and bringing him in earlier.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
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    1,184

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    please soak all your hay pellets and cubes!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2008
    Location
    Spokane, WA
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    242

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    Wow, I guess I am kinda surprised how little hay people are comfortable feeding their horse. My horse (who is admittedly a little larger than yours and a hardish keeper, but also older and working less) gets 30 pounds of high quality hay per day. Her schedule is somewhat similar to your horse's - she gets ~7.5lbs of her hay first thing (6:30am), then she is turned out (with no hay and no grass most of the year) until ~2-4pm (depending on season), when she comes in and gets ~15lbs of hay plus her "grain" (1lb rice bran pellets, 1lb alfalfa pellets, plus supplements) and then she gets a final ~15lbs of her hay at night feed ~7-8pm (depending on season). My previous horse was the same size as yours, same age, and working slightly less and getting approximately the same amount of hay and "grain".

    My horse has had ulcers (from getting stressed from traveling) and when she is suffering she is very unhappy by the time she is coming in from turnout. Are you sure he doesn't have ulcers now that he has less forage before and during turnout?

    I would definitely be adding some serious amount of hay cubes to his morning feed - hay cubes have longer stem forage/fiber rather than pellets, so they are better for keeping the digestive system functioning properly.

    Good luck!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Location
    Lake County, IL
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    1,242

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    Your horse's situation sounds similar to mine - not enough hay for what he needs. I understand the barn's dilemma because of the price of the hay, and for some of the horses it is working fine, but for my 17hh horse, it just doesn't cut it.

    I've purchased this (http://www.buckeyenutrition.com/plea...ler-cubes.aspx) because it was easily accessible from my feed store. He gets 4 lbs per day in the early evening between 3pm hay and 8 pm hay in addition to everything else he eats (hay and custom barn pellet feed). It is called a 'cube,' but is shaped like a giant pellet. He eats one at a time, which slows down the consumption, and doesn't spill it all over the floor, which he does with regular size pellets.



  10. #30
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    Feb. 11, 2011
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    1,395

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcella View Post
    Your horse's situation sounds similar to mine - not enough hay for what he needs. I understand the barn's dilemma because of the price of the hay, and for some of the horses it is working fine, but for my 17hh horse, it just doesn't cut it.

    I've purchased this (http://www.buckeyenutrition.com/plea...ler-cubes.aspx) because it was easily accessible from my feed store. He gets 4 lbs per day in the early evening between 3pm hay and 8 pm hay in addition to everything else he eats (hay and custom barn pellet feed). It is called a 'cube,' but is shaped like a giant pellet. He eats one at a time, which slows down the consumption, and doesn't spill it all over the floor, which he does with regular size pellets.
    How big is the "giant pellet"?



  11. #31
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Location
    Lake County, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Taylor View Post
    How big is the "giant pellet"?
    I would say the top 1/2 of a thumb.



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