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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2011
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    246

    Default Inexpensive, non-bulky half pad?

    My saddle fits my pony well, but I like to use a half pad to cushion her back to keep her happy, comfortable, and to prevent soreness. I am only fourteen, so a Mattes isn't really an affordable option...

    What do you think would be a good, inexpensive ($100 or less, and the lower, the better!) NON-bulky half pad to use?
    Last edited by Crazy-Pony; Dec. 10, 2012 at 10:46 PM.



  2. #2
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    Nov. 12, 2012
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    Default

    If your saddle fits correctly, you shouldn't need anything to prevent soreness. Half pads are meant to correct fit problems and are going to be bulky because they're made of sheepskin.... If you really want to throw something under there, buy an Lami Cell gel pad
    http://www.doversaddlery.com/lami-ce...FXCmPAodumkAnA

    .. I use that on my jumper and like it.. It's inexpensive.. or you could buy a thin line half pad.. although I don't see the point in spending money on something that's as thin as a slice of deli meat.. I don't really get what it does...
    Last edited by AlterHalter123; Dec. 10, 2012 at 10:38 PM. Reason: poor grammar!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Mar. 7, 2012
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    Default

    Something like a Thinline might work out really well for you. It cushions and absorbs shock really well, and they are relatively inexpensive. I think they retail for about $85, but if you check in eBay, Thinline often sells their 'demo-quality' half pads for about $47. They might be a tad dinged up or dusty, but it is hidden under a saddle anyways!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Nov. 12, 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maigenesis View Post
    Something like a Thinline might work out really well for you. It cushions and absorbs shock really well, and they are relatively inexpensive. I think they retail for about $85, but if you check in eBay, Thinline often sells their 'demo-quality' half pads for about $47. They might be a tad dinged up or dusty, but it is hidden under a saddle anyways!

    Okay like I said earlier.. maybe I don't understand the mechanics behind a thinline pad, but how can a piece of deli meat absorb shock and cushion.. I'm pretty sure if I were to put that thing on my back and you sat on me, I'd still feel your bony butt in my back the same as if I didn't have one on... I know a saddle goes on top of it when on a horse, but I just don't see how it does anything but take my money.


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2011
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    620

    Default

    Sounds like a Thinline is your best bet. They are not meant to correct saddle fit, but they provide the horse with some extra comfort. The way the pad is designed, it is very thin but provides a lot of protection to the horse's back. My mare absolutely loves her Thinline. I was skeptical at first, but if she likes it, I have to believe in it.



  6. #6
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    Nov. 12, 2012
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    Default

    Okay I'm getting some thumbs down, but no one has explained to me how the Thinline pad works... Someone please explain to me how a thin piece of whatever can provide such amazing shock absorbing qualities and comfort.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 7, 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlterHalter123 View Post
    Okay I'm getting some thumbs down, but no one has explained to me how the Thinline pad works... Someone please explain to me how a thin piece of whatever can provide such amazing shock absorbing qualities and comfort.
    They have a couple videos on their website with a tennis ball dropping-imagine that it is the rider's posting or sitting down after a jump.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
    Location
    PA
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    Default

    FWIW my horse's saddle fits very well, and he actually moves BETTER when I don't use a half pad. Just a plain square pad makes him very happy.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
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    1,718

    Default

    I don't know how the Thinlines work, but I feel a huge difference when I foxhunt with one. I foxhunt with a shaped baby pad under a Thinline. My saddle fits well, but three hours of running and jumping can make my knees pretty sore. My horse moves a little more freely with the Thinline too.

    My white half pad was one of the demo quality ones off eBay. The only thing wrong with it is the logo is smudged.



  10. #10
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    Jul. 10, 2008
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    NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlterHalter123 View Post
    Okay like I said earlier.. maybe I don't understand the mechanics behind a thinline pad, but how can a piece of deli meat absorb shock and cushion.. I'm pretty sure if I were to put that thing on my back and you sat on me, I'd still feel your bony butt in my back the same as if I didn't have one on... I know a saddle goes on top of it when on a horse, but I just don't see how it does anything but take my money.
    I do know that the type of material Thinline uses is the same material used in labs to prevent glassware from shaking/falling off of the benchtop (water proofed, anti-microbial polyethylene foam). If you drop a golfball (or any solid item that bounces) it will prevent it from bouncing; it just falls flat on the Thinline pad. Pretty cool!

    ETA--In the past I've used a Thinline pad, but I am currently using a mattes pad, as my saddle (which used to fit perfectly when I got it new), has opened up a little too much and now I need some more fluff in the wither area. I like both, but wouldn't refrain from using the Thinline in the future, as it does a good job of shock absorption w/o interfering w/ fit.
    Last edited by jlphilli; Sep. 16, 2013 at 01:35 AM. Reason: Typo
    Quote Originally Posted by rustbreeches View Post
    [George Morris] doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, he prefers Dos Equis



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    120

    Default

    Here is a demo Thinline on eBay for the next 2 days: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Demo-quality.../130813610680?

    I bought this same demo Thinline (the logo might be smudged which makes it "demo", but it is literally the exact same as the $89 retail version) and used it when riding schoolies and it is really a great pad.
    Equine Web Design & Marketing
    designequine.org



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maigenesis View Post
    They have a couple videos on their website with a tennis ball dropping-imagine that it is the rider's posting or sitting down after a jump.
    Quote Originally Posted by jlphilli View Post
    I do know that the type of material Thinline uses is the same material used in labs to prevent glassware from shaking/falling off of the benchtop (water proofed, anti-microbial polyethylene foam). If you drop a golfball (or any solid item that bounces) it will prevent it from bouncing; it just falls flat on the Thinline pad. Pretty cool!

    ETA--In the past I've used a Thinline pad, but I am currently using a mattes pad, as my saddle (which used to fit perfectly when I got it new), has opened up a little too much and now I need some more fluff in the wither area. I like both, but wouldn't refrain from using the Thinline in the future, as it does a good job of shock absorption w/o interfering w/ fit.
    Thank you for replying with something productive rather than just thumbs downing and leaving.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2009
    Posts
    101

    Default

    Might be a bit bulky for what you're looking for, but Shedrow now makes a memory foam half pad (their version of the Ogilvy half pad) for $99. http://greenhawk.com/wdItemDesc.asp?...ricSKU=RIE5348



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Horse Heaven
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    1,840

    Default

    I look at these pads with a grain of salt...when searching for a pad that protects either you or a horse, search for "shock absorption" or "impact". Many companies make them, and you can look at their research and decide for yourself. Some of the pads can be bought just as pads and cut down to fit into half pads designed to hold a pad. Read up and decide for yourself...try to borrow from a friend to test out first. Each type has it's fan club.

    Materials include memory foam, specialty foam, gel pads, etc.

    Saddleright (spendy, but popular here - my barn has many riders using it)
    Oglivy
    Matrix inserts (some protect the horse, some for horse and rider)
    Cashel pads
    Thinline
    Supracor products
    Ecogold products



  15. #15
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    Jul. 10, 2008
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    NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Justa Bob View Post
    Supracor products
    As a personal "review" of a Supracor pad: I used to use one of these ~11 years ago in the jumpers. I think they are nice in a sense that they are very lightweight and seem to do well for impact protection (and probably shock absorption). However, I find it very difficult to sit a horse's gaits when this pad is used. Not sure if it's a bouncing back effect or what. Just my personal experience!
    Quote Originally Posted by rustbreeches View Post
    [George Morris] doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, he prefers Dos Equis


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2011
    Posts
    246

    Default

    That you all for your replies! I have narrowed it down to three pads: Lami-Cell Memory Half Pad, an Ultra Thinline Half Pad, and a Wilkers Quilted Back Half Pad. Which one do you think is best?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2007
    Location
    Landrum, SC
    Posts
    1,735

    Default

    A plain ThinLine pad with no backing is your best bet for impact absorption without bulk. The LamiCell pad, on the other hand, is by far thick enough to really make a well-fitted saddle too tight. It's great, though, if you have a saddle that's too wide and need to fill in space.

    ThinLine, btw, not only absorbs concussion for the horse but also the rider. Try riding with one for a while and then going back to nothing (or another pad). You'll notice a difference. And, yes, I've also felt some pads created more bounce for the rider.
    Athletic Horses. Educated Riders.
    www.Ride-With-Confidence.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2009
    Location
    On the buckle
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    957

    Default

    http://www.smartpakequine.com/fleece...pad-5499p.aspx

    Here's one for $17.95. I use it and like it because it is fairly thin and doesn't affect my saddle fit. It's also easily washable.

    Sorry if the link doesn't work. Just google smartpak wither pad.
    Mon Ogon (Mojo), black/bay 16 H TB Gelding



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
    Posts
    438

    Default

    I was a HUGE skeptic of the Thinline pad. I am a bigger rider and my OTTB was having some slight back soreness and I couldn't do anything too drastic because my saddle fits so I tried the Thinline. I will NEVER go back. I saw the videos and they didn't sell me on it but riding in it was night and day. My OTTB has NO TRACE of back soreness anymore and my other horse is so much more comfortable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa.Hare.Jones View Post
    ThinLine, btw, not only absorbs concussion for the horse but also the rider. Try riding with one for a while and then going back to nothing (or another pad). You'll notice a difference. And, yes, I've also felt some pads created more bounce for the rider.
    I can attest to this as well, I only have one Thinline (two horses and two saddles) and I forgot to use it one day. I REALLY noticed a difference. I plan on getting a white one to show in because I don't want to be without it ever again.
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2004
    Posts
    10,345

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlterHalter123 View Post
    If your saddle fits correctly, you shouldn't need anything to prevent soreness. Half pads are meant to correct fit problems and are going to be bulky because they're made of sheepskin.... If you really want to throw something under there, buy an Lami Cell gel pad
    http://www.doversaddlery.com/lami-ce...FXCmPAodumkAnA

    .. I use that on my jumper and like it.. It's inexpensive.. or you could buy a thin line half pad.. although I don't see the point in spending money on something that's as thin as a slice of deli meat.. I don't really get what it does...
    I have that Lami Cell gel pad and it is very bulky, I don't think its at all what the OP wants. I would recommend a Thinline, something doesn't have to be thick to be effective.



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