The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 42
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,801

    Default

    Skating lessons will also teach how to fall. Much better to roll on your shoulder than to whack your head.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JenJ View Post
    gotta say the only thing going through my mind as I am falling off is "oh crap this is going to hurt" and "I cant believe I'm actually going to fall off".
    Ummmm, yes, along with "please, horse, don't run away this time". Although sometimes I am lucky enough to add "let the **** go!!" and "do try not to get stepped on." That's about as good as it gets.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eponacowgirl View Post
    We've all seen those falls when you just happen to land on your feet... I think the point of the rule is not to teach someone to get launched and land on their feet- if you get launched, you land like you should land. If you fall off and you happen to land on your feet, you can go on. Does that make sense?
    Makes total sense to me. I can totally see it happen at a lower level event: rider gets unbalanced, kind of slides to the ground and lands on his/her feet, and is allowed to continue.
    For some obscure reason my first instinct, when falling off, is to try landing on my feet. No one taught me how to fall off, on the contrary, my instructors taught me how to stay.on.the.horse. No one even thought of teaching emergency dismounts back then!
    Still, I've fallen off many, many times over the years, and only got hurt when I didn't land on my feet. I know I would not be able to "tuck and roll". It's just not in my genes! I want to land on my feet and hold on to my horse. Especially when we're miles out alone in the woods!
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2009
    Location
    Raeford, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,824

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Skating lessons will also teach how to fall. Much better to roll on your shoulder than to whack your head.
    If eventing starts involving ice, I am so out of here

    (Although I have probably performed a perfect double toe loop - triple sachow combination getting thrown over a trekhaner on multiple occasions)
    "Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing" - Robert Benchley
    Cotton would fight.
    http://buildingthegrove.blogspot.com/


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Location
    England
    Posts
    264

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BarnField View Post
    Yes, Kerilli,
    in the first article you linked to above (http://www.eventingworldwide.com/how-to-fall) it says:

    "NEVER try to roll over the top of your head in the classic school PE type roll. Always aim your shoulder at the ground, with the intention of impacting the ground with your shoulder blade / back"

    This is what I was saying in my first post, roll over your shoulder. Not a classic tuck-n-roll over your head.
    Although in the PH article, it did suggest using a limb in the process to help dissipate the forces, not to absorb all, but to help reduce the force of impact a bit.
    Rather break an arm than break my back or neck.
    Yes, but as Neil MacKinnon (who wrote those articles) said to me "Rather not break anything!" He and his martial arts friends practised falls on concrete... without injury.

    Most people tuck and roll and go to one side or other, I doubt it's possible to do a perfect 'forward roll' off a horse! The point really is about whether you tuck your chin in, and curve your arms to roll round them (iykwim), or keep your head up and stick them out to break your fall. Huge difference.
    There's about 13 pics of me (tog had a field day!) coming off a horse a couple of months ago and I do a fairly good roll around my leading curved arm and shoulders and onto back. not very tucked or at all stylish, but no injury at all. that's good enough for me...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2009
    Posts
    830

    Default

    LET GO OF THE REINS! I dislocated BOTH shoulders in 45 minutes by getting dumped by a spoiled pony who bucked on the landing side of the jump. Holding onto a rein is a really bad idea, and I learned that the hard way...After I popped shoulder number one back in, I was steaming mad and got back on the stinky pony, who then piled me off on the other side and got shoulder number two. I did learn after that, though!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Location
    Coastal SC
    Posts
    472

    Default

    I have fallen 4 times in 4 years, and definately did it wrong. Broken my shoulder the first time, both wrists the second time, an ankle the third time and another wrist the fourth time- that needed a plate and screws. That was April. So far my husband still has me banned from horse hiney. Perhaps enrolling in fall class would get me closer to the back of a horse ? ��
    Honey Badger don't give a s*#^!

    "..a three-day event is not a test of speed and endurance, it is a test of character" ~JW



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Location
    VA--> Washington (state)
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheval Gris View Post
    I have fallen 4 times in 4 years, and definately did it wrong. Broken my shoulder the first time, both wrists the second time, an ankle the third time and another wrist the fourth time- that needed a plate and screws. That was April.
    Not sure how old you are, but have you had your vitamin D checked? I've done a lot with bone health over the years and that many fractures in a short time would make me suspicious...hope u don't mind me saying that. Might get your husband to let u ride again
    And the wise, Jack Daniels drinking, slow-truck-driving, veteran TB handler who took "no shit from no hoss Miss L, y'hear," said: "She aint wrapped too tight."



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,740

    Default

    I don't think you can simulate fall situations.
    You can teach how to emergency dismount...but seriously? I have never needed to emergency dismount in my life.

    Here, I'll describe 3 of my falls:

    1. One time I almost busted XC was when my horse slipped in a turn. I busted HARD on his neck and it knocked all of the wind out of me. I laid there on his neck like a monkey for a while actually. If I would have fallen I would have rolled off of his neck and ker-splatted on the ground. There's no tuck and roll there.

    2. The other time I almost busted at a show was when I came off of an up bank to a ramp and then there was a tree. Horse went right and I went left. I almost face planted it. Bad news.
    Tuck and roll would not have worked. It would have looked like a cartoon--face plant and then slide down the tree.

    3. Another time my horse was very fresh off of a 2 year lay up and he was having a hard time keeping his feet on the ground. He finally reared well enough that I slid off-I did land on my feet but there was no way in hell I was letting him go and he started running backwards. I had a-hold of both reins and he drug on my ass with my hands over my head until the reins broke.
    tuck and roll would not have helped me. It did strip all of my muscles from my arm pits to my hips. That was lovely.

    4. I landed on a BN ramp one time. I took out part of the bushes on it. When your fall is broken by lumber it's hard to tuck and roll.
    I think I have a pic of that one too...
    (2nd pic on my gag reel)
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/2...oper-reel.html

    I think beyond the innate reflex of putting your hands around your head there is not much to be taught.

    Busting off of a galloping horse is much much different from falling off of a balance beam or karate chopping someone and then doing a tuck and roll on the landing.
    Maybe we could teach people proper XC falling technique by pushing them out of a moving vehicle onto a grassy knoll?

    sorry, I'm a skeptic.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,072

    Default

    I had a recent unscheduled dismount. No, I didn't think about how to land, but yes, years of martial arts apparently stuck after all this time because I did not attempt to stop my fall with my hands -no broken arm bones. It was a pretty good fall too -I at least bruised a rib.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    DQ here...I know it's not the same as coming off over fences, but FWIW I seem to do a hell of a lot more tucking than I do rolling. I'm wondering if it's because of my lumpy bits?
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Location
    Coastal SC
    Posts
    472

    Default

    Yea I asked my doc about doing a bone density. I'm 29. He said just take 1500 of calcium everyday. If we did scan you and bones were crappy, we'd just put you on that calcium. Two of those falls were violent- one i bailed on a bolter at a full gallop and landed on my feet. ��. All the others happened trying to prevent the fall. Hubby put his foot down when i had to take care of our 10 mo old with one arm. 3 were on a horse I sold. The last wrist was on my newish horse who is a total dead head that went into a wild bucking rage after mounting- we are still investigating that. I've had some crappy dang luck these last 4 years of my 20 in the tack ...
    Honey Badger don't give a s*#^!

    "..a three-day event is not a test of speed and endurance, it is a test of character" ~JW



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
    Posts
    6,706


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Location
    VA--> Washington (state)
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Cheval Gris- I sent you a PM.
    And the wise, Jack Daniels drinking, slow-truck-driving, veteran TB handler who took "no shit from no hoss Miss L, y'hear," said: "She aint wrapped too tight."



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2009
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I prefer to tuck and roll, let my rolls take the impact!!! Had a funny dismount while mounting. Up on one side horse drops head I keep going and land on my head on the other side. No time to brace, tuck, roll, or pray. Neck was sore for a week. Sometimes you can not plan for what to do in a fall, just take them as they come. Bracing with arms and legs can be the worst thing to do.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2008
    Location
    new england
    Posts
    108

    Default air time

    why is it that these falls seem to be so slooooowww mo? had one just 2 days ago and seriously had enough time to think about NOT landing on my brand new titanium knees, And 'what the hell set this off' and 'oh my butt is going to hurt' And several other random thoughts before thumping gracelessly into the dirt.

    and to the point about landing on your feet? the only time I managed that I came away with a tibial plateau fracture. Not fun.

    busted out laughing at RiverBendPol's description! thanks for the laugh!

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverBendPol View Post
    When I'm falling off my horse, I am mostly marveling at the air time I am enjoying and wondering how much it will hurt when I land, whether my horse will stand and wait for me or bolt back to the barn. So far, I always seem to land on my heaviest body part. Being able to roll this monstrosity into a ball would be mind blowing...When I was 13, I learned how to jump off a galloping horse, touch the ground running and bounce right back up into the saddle again. Pretty sure that won't ever happen again.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,789

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RAyers View Post
    Good Boy! He came back for you Beats the heck out of trudging home in fresh powder.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Location
    England
    Posts
    264

    Default

    I think that's something adrenalin does, make time go mega-slowly when you're under extreme stress. It's very weird. Last time I had a car crash, I hit a patch of diesel and lost control, car spun and hit barriers front and back, and I had all the time in the world to think "nooooooo... please tell me this is a dream... yes, just a dream..." before getting a faceful of airbag. It felt like about 20 secs worth of spin, not 1. Really odd.
    And the last time I got seriously decanted from a horse, I had NO idea I was going, I went from calmly thinking "I'm fine, I'm still in the middle" as she launched, to being on the floor with a dislocated knee (wrecked medial and ACL ligaments). Still don't know what she did... but the landing on my feet did the damage.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2010
    Posts
    72

    Default

    When I fall off it always goes something like this: Wow, we are doing so well. Wait a minute. Was that a buck? Holy SH!!!T!! Welp, I'm about to come off and this will probably hurt. Please tell me I shut the gate or he's running off.

    I don't think my frazzled mind can process how I'm going to land. It normally just happens. But I'm bottom heavy so I normally land where I have more cushion and only my ego is damaged.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    12,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eponacowgirl View Post
    We've all seen those falls when you just happen to land on your feet... I think the point of the rule is not to teach someone to get launched and land on their feet- if you get launched, you land like you should land. If you fall off and you happen to land on your feet, you can go on. Does that make sense?
    I agree with this....the point of the rule is not for people to try and land on their feet but when a fall is so nothing, that a rider does land on their feet, they should be allowed to continue at the lower levels.

    Funny thing though...the one and ONLY time I have EVER fallen and landed on my feet was when I was competing at Prelim (under the old rules where a fall didn't get the big E). Jumping into the water at Essex in NJ (course used to be at Gladstone but is sadly gone). Horse jumped the snot out of the log into the water--cracking his back so hard as to jarr me slightly loose. We landed on land but then were right into the water. My horse saw the water and darted left. Since I was a tad unseated, he basically spun right out from under me...and I landed standing...it was not by any effort on my part. We caught him right away, I got on and continued the course with no issues. If I had been able to stick with him, I'm sure he would have go right into the water..... And because of how things were flagged....I didn't even get any penalties for the fall...just time. I miss the old days


    But anyway....I tyically don't have time to think when I'm falling. I just re-act...based on instincts that I still have that were developed riding evil little horses when I was a pre-teen and teen Best way of learning how to fall is by surviving from falling often when you are young and bounce. (as in I used to fall off on a daily basis from evil little black mare until I learned how to stick better than a cowboy )
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Teaching a newbie cross country speeds
    By Nancy! in forum Eventing
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2012, 02:24 PM
  2. Teaching a TWH Cross to trot? Possible?
    By Sillymoose in forum Off Course
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Sep. 13, 2011, 11:37 AM
  3. Teaching Jockeys How To Fall
    By onthehill in forum Racing
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Sep. 11, 2010, 07:01 AM
  4. Went to my first cross country run!
    By AmandaandTuff in forum Eventing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sep. 14, 2009, 08:58 PM
  5. teaching horse to stay when you fall off
    By Fiat Lux in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Mar. 20, 2008, 12:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •