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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2012
    Location
    Chesterfield, VA
    Posts
    77

    Default Ulcer?

    My Tennesee Walker has been burping and I found out that it could mean he has an ulcer. I read about the scoping but they said it was expensive and didnt always show the ulcer so most owners just did the treatment. He only has two signs (slow eating and burping). I read that stage 1 ulcer may has no signs and resolve on its own but my friends horse only showed one sign and ended up having stage 4 bleeding ulcer. I'm not sure what to do? There is two different treatments I've been looking at. One less expensive but only treats stage one and the other is more expensive but treats all stages. I'm not sure if I should just treat him but I don't know how long it would take to show improvments. The more expensive says 1-2 days but if he doesn't show improvments does that mean I just stop? If he don't have ulcers then why is he burping considering horse aren't suppose to be able to. He does have a reason to have an ulcer because he was formally abused which caused a lot of stress plus he was a show horse and 60% of them have ulcers. I just don't know what to do!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    134

    Default

    I think you should probably talk to your vet before doing anything. Most would be happy to talk to you over the phone about your concerns.
    "There is no secret so close as that between a rider and his horse." - Robert Smith Surtees



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2008
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    267

    Default

    The only way to have a plan is to create one...with your vet. I agree with calling your vet to discuss your situation with your horse. I love when people say "it's only ulcers..." (not that you said that here) Ulcers can be minor or serious, and that can only be determined by the Vet. The treatment plan (and maintenance plan for warding off a setback) might have unique features to your horse. Good luck, and I hope you have a happy, healthy horse soon
    Certified Spiritual Medium/ Animal Communicator
    www.heatherevebristol.com
    www.meliorastables.net



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    596

    Default

    Is this the same horse that was choking?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2012
    Location
    Chesterfield, VA
    Posts
    77

    Default

    No, that's my quarter horse. This one has had no health issues that I know of except this burping.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2012
    Location
    Coastal NC
    Posts
    980

    Default

    What two treatment plans are you looking at? I agree to speak with your vet but if I had to choose a treatment plan I would go with real treatment for most type uclers (hindgut are a different story) not just something that only treats stage 1.

    I have had great success with both Blue Pop Rocks (just switched to those recently) and Ranitidine at different times over the years. Good Luck, if it is ulcers treatment can reveal a completely different horse!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,751

    Default

    Horses can't burp. What exactly is he doing that makes you think so?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2011
    Location
    Central Va.
    Posts
    691

    Default

    My horse had several colic episodes. When the vet tubed him we'd get several buckets of reflux that smelled like silage--fermented crap smell.
    Even on "good" days I swear the horse would occassionally burp. I could hear it coming, sounded like a belch, and it smelled bad. Technically horses don't burp but the gas has to go somewhere.
    Turns out the horse had delayed gastric emptying. Stuff was sitting in his stomach too long. He also had major ulcers caused by those gastic impactions.
    Treated the ulcers, and changed the management with him, that is soaked pelleted feeds, no hay etc.
    Talk to your vet, smell your horse's breath after he "burps."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2012
    Location
    Chesterfield, VA
    Posts
    77

    Default

    I have contacted my vet and am just waiting for him to call me back. He is burping, horses aren't suppose to be able to but I read that some horse are formed differently there which allows them to burp an the regurgitate into his esophase plus a sign of ulcers is burping.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2011
    Location
    Central Va.
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Hey Cayleigh,
    What did the vet say about the burping? I really need to know.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2012
    Location
    Chesterfield, VA
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Hey, he just said he could run the test to check for ulcers if we wanted to but thats all... sorry



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2008
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    242

    Default

    I would just get some Blue Pop Rocks and treat your horse. Their Trial Offer only costs $12.95 and is typically enough to see an improvement. I have spent the last 12 months figuring out my horse's ulcer issues and how to best deal with them. Horses with gastric ulcers, and some horses without, also frequently have hindgut ulcers. I believe my horse did/does and oat flour seems to be making a big difference for her (after I addressed the gastric ulcers and she was still showing some symptoms).



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2006
    Location
    VA (or MS during the school year)
    Posts
    2,501

    Default

    Your vet sounds less than willing to a) work with you on treatments that are affordable and b) educate you. I would suggest finding a new vet. I, like you, was a 15 year old horse owner. My parents were very hands off. I paid for the horse and his board/farrier/lesson bills and my parents paid vet bills but ultimately left it up to me to coordinate that. They trusted me to make the right choices financially and not run up their CC. I had a great vet who would talk to me if I called with a question, he would work with me if I told him we couldn't afford a certain test or treatment, and would let me ride along with him on call because I so badly wanted to LEARN.

    If I would have called him saying "I think my horse has ulcers but I can't afford to do the scope" then he would have come up with a game plan to start treatment of some kind. Your post makes it sound like he left you hanging.

    Find a vet in the area who will take the time to at the very least try and educate you and possibly take you under his wing to let you learn through ride alongs, or loaning you books on care, etc.

    I second,third, etc what others are saying about trying the blue pop rocks. It's worth a shot, can't hurt, and is cheaper than trying to scope.
    "People ask me 'will I remember them if I make it'. I ask them 'will you remember me if I don't?'"


    1 members found this post helpful.

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