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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,414

    Default barn reno - stall size question

    So I'm trying to finalize the stall layout. The barn is structurally divided into three sections (and this can't be changed). The only plausible placement of stalls, relative to doors and such, is along the back wall of each section. I planned on 4 stalls-- the center section was going to have two stalls side by side, 10ft wide by 12deep, and a 12x12 stall in each side section.

    But, now that I've got everything cleared out of the center section and can mark the stall outlines on the floor, turns out the available space is little more narrow than I thought. Those 2 stalls would end up only being 9ft 4" wide. (still 12ft deep).

    I have 2 horses and one pony. (But the pony is only a foster project. Then again I do kind of plan on always having a pony around here, so let's just say that yes, I have a pony. my, well that felt unexpectedly cathartic.) And finally, I have a trio of goats, who would share one stall. They don't absolutely have to have a stall though-- they have a good enough shelter outside.

    My options, that I can see: I could go ahead with the original plan for 4 horse stalls: two large 12x12 on the sides, two small 9'4"x12 in the center.
    Or, in that center section, I could make one of those stalls full size, and then just have a small 8x12ish "pen" alongside it for the goats (but useless for just about any other purpose).

    Or I could abandon the 4th stall altogether and move the tack and feedroom into that space. I don't like that option much b/c I already have a good place for the feed/tackrm with cement floor and ceiling already in place, so I'd only have to frame the walls and a door. If I move it over next to the stall, it's more carpentry, wiring, AND, then one of horse stalls would be completely cut off visually from the other horses.

    I laid out poles on the ground for the 9'4" x 12 stall, and walked the two horses into their "stall", turned back to the "door", etc. It felt tight doing the turn, not surprisingly. Only works if I'm out in front rather than leading them at the shoulder, which is fine for my guys-- all are well mannered and would not rush into a stall or grab for a feed bucket. And they wouldn't be in stalls much at all-- just really inclement weather. Obviously I'd put the big horses on the ends in the large stalls.
    So, I think the 2 small stalls would work for me in my current situation. Guess I'm just wondering if in the long term it's a dumb thing to do. If I'm going to all this expense, I want the barn to be an asset for a future owner-- not something a buyer would look at and say WTF were they thinking, making a stall <10ft wide??
    WWCothD?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    4,861

    Default

    Can you make the two smaller stalls or the full stall plus goat pen and have the wall between them be removable so it can be converted to one very large stall?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,414

    Default

    good point; I'm just doing those u-channels, where the boards slide down into the channel. So I suppose it's not a permanent decision in the end. I or future buyer could move/remove the dividing wall if I wanted. So, maybe what I sh do is put an extra post in, on the front side of the stalls: place one post at the center point, to allow two equal sized stalls in the future, and one at the "full size/ goat pen" dividing line, that I can use for the current setup. Then I'll have the u-channel attachment point already there. Hmmm. Just might be the ticket. Thanks!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,336

    Default

    Another idea is to do 3 big box stalls and one straight/tie stall. I don't know how you manage your horses- but for me- since the horses don't live in the stalls all the time and I really only need the stalls for safe places to seperate and feed- or in unusual weather... I put some tie stalls in my barn plan. I know they are old fashioned- but I think there are many good aspects of this style of stabling.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,336

    Default

    On the second thought- I'm not sure how you would position one tie stall in that situation without pinning the one tied horse between two roaming box stall horses... it might not be the same tranquility as he'd have when all the horses are facing the same direction munching hay.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2012
    Posts
    556

    Default

    I think making the partition removal in the center section is the ideal solution.

    With your current population, the narrower stalls could be for the pony and the goats, and the larger boxes for the horses. Without the center partition in the center section, you have a foaling stall or a very roomy WB size stall.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2006
    Posts
    81

    Default

    Can you build one or two stalls only chest high, so horses could hang their heads in the aisle? This worked with my older, settled horses.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,720

    Default

    How big is the pony? I have a 12H pony now and she has lived very comfortably in stalls as small as 7 x 10. Most ponies are fine in smaller stalls so maybe you could make an 8 x 12 pony stall and that would leave ~11x12 for the other stall.

    BTW, all my current stalls are about 10 x 11 with a variety of horse sizes up to 16H and they all have plenty of room.


    Christa


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,414

    Default

    the pony's only 11 hands, so maybe the 8x12 would be fine. And then I could have the three equines adjacent rather than horse-goat-horse-horse.

    I definitely plan on grills on the stallfronts. If I'm using the stall for injury layup or to segregate a new horse, I don't want them to even suspect that they might get out. Once my 16.2h warmblood was on stall rest for about 6 weeks, and he had a major flip-out when he saw the other guys running in the pasture. He lost his brain to such an extent that I think he might've given it a try.

    Anyway I think I'm all set--I'll go with the one full-size stall but install extra posts so that I could make the two stalls equal sized if I ever wanted to.

    Thanks guys! (squeeeeeeee! so excited)



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2004
    Location
    Upper Peninsula, Michigan
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    I love the idea of making the wall between the two smaller stalls removable. I think you are doing exactly what I'd do. Congrats on the reno--updates are fun!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11

    Default

    I have a horsey acquaintance whose stalls are 8 x 12. To me, that is far less than ideal, but having said that, she's had her barn that way for years without any actual problems. She puts full-size horses in them--one as large as 17.3.

    In my own barn, my stalls are 11 x 12, but one winter we ended up with one more horse than we had stalls (my horses are normally out 24/7 except for very bad weather) so we made a temporary stall at one end of the aisle by putting up a pipe panel. It was 9 x 12. My 15-hand horse was absolutely fine in there for overnight use. She seemed to have plenty of room to move and turn around.

    Point being, especially if you're just using the stalls for short-term use such as feeding times and bad weather, I think you'd be fine with a 9'4" x 12 stall.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,414

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RegentLion View Post
    I love the idea of making the wall between the two smaller stalls removable. I think you are doing exactly what I'd do. Congrats on the reno--updates are fun!
    yes, very fun. Spent the day out there with a crowbar and sledgehammer to pull out the straight stalls in one of the side sections. But spent a good portion of the time just walking through various tasks--leading imaginary horses into imaginary stalls, opening pretend stall doors so I could decide which direction would be best to open, etc. Not too far off from cantering over imaginary fences when I was little, and just as fun.

    ETA.. also dreaming up uses for some of the incredible lumber in this barn that's left over. Most of it went right back into other places into the barn, but still lots of fun scraps left. There was a 20-foot long 12x12" oak beam that we pulled out. And it's filled with oak planks that are 18-20" wide-- you just can't get lumber like that. I actually gave the 12x12 beam to my contractor-- he's a real artisan who is devoted to restoring old barns, and he did such a great job here, so it felt right that it will find a home in someone else's barn.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,182

    Default

    My 14h ponies have lived comfortably in 10X10 stalls.
    They currently live in a 11X15 and it's a freaking paddock for them. I wouldn't think that 9.5X12 is too small at all.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2004
    Location
    Upper Peninsula, Michigan
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    yes, very fun. Spent the day out there with a crowbar and sledgehammer to pull out the straight stalls in one of the side sections. But spent a good portion of the time just walking through various tasks--leading imaginary horses into imaginary stalls, opening pretend stall doors so I could decide which direction would be best to open, etc. Not too far off from cantering over imaginary fences when I was little, and just as fun.

    ETA.. also dreaming up uses for some of the incredible lumber in this barn that's left over. Most of it went right back into other places into the barn, but still lots of fun scraps left. There was a 20-foot long 12x12" oak beam that we pulled out. And it's filled with oak planks that are 18-20" wide-- you just can't get lumber like that. I actually gave the 12x12 beam to my contractor-- he's a real artisan who is devoted to restoring old barns, and he did such a great job here, so it felt right that it will find a home in someone else's barn.
    Okaayyy maybe by "fun" I mean "great to see things come together?" LOL they ARE a lot of work. But so is building brand new. I'm totally envious of your barn lumber!!! I'd die to have some to make a huge table and benches, etc., We are in the process of building our barn and hope someday to have a timber-frame home so I'm keeping my eyes out for cool stuff like that barn lumber. Hard to find around here--at least in good enough condition to actually use!!



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