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  1. #21
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    The horse should flex lateral at the atlas/axis not 'give' longitudinally. There is action/reaction should cause jaw mobilization, and then the horse can be asked/allowed to lengthen the neck (fdo).
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  2. #22
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Yes, I thought it was pretty obvious that this discussion was about LATERAL flexion.



  3. #23
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    Oct. 20, 2007
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    I absolutely can not "turn the key" with the whip holding hand. The whip lying across my thigh prevents it.



  4. #24
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    Jul. 25, 2007
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    As echoed by others...this exercise takes a bit of finesse and in the hands of a green rider or heavy handed rider it may not be of much value.



  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by alicen View Post
    I absolutely can not "turn the key" with the whip holding hand. The whip lying across my thigh prevents it.
    Yes... well... you move whip to your other hand....



  6. #26
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by alicen View Post
    I absolutely can not "turn the key" with the whip holding hand. The whip lying across my thigh prevents it.
    I had the same issue. Moving the whip to the other hand caused other problems, so I had to figure out a way. Key was to hold the whip nearly horizontal with it resting at the very top of my thigh, not diagonally across the thigh as most riders do. With the whip held like this, I can "turn the key" and all the whip does is rotate a little.

    YMMV... I have thick thighs and a definite crease at the top to rest the whip in!
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  7. #27
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    Nov. 10, 2010
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    I've used this exercise (or a variant...sometimes +7 is a bit too much) for many horses. I think a key to it is NOT to drop the horse when you release. The rein shouldn't just "disappear" to the horse. It should soften/release...but as you straighten the horse back out, the outside rein takes up a bit and the inside rein gives a bit/lessens the pressure. Think of them as connected (which they are...by the bit...through the horse's mouth), and as one releases, the other takes up a bit of the slack.

    I like using the image of a circle...the left rein attaches to the bit, which attaches to the right rein, which attaches to my right arm, which attaches to my right shoulder, which attaches across my back to my left shoulder, which attaches to my left arm, which attaches to my left rein. The reins and my arms/shoulders create a circle that works together when doing these kinds of flexions and exercises. I don't just drop the horse off one side of the circle at any time.
    Last edited by Oberon13; Dec. 10, 2012 at 03:36 PM.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Oberon thank you for that great explanation and visual!



  9. #29
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    Dec. 11, 2010
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    for larkspur...I have not ridden with Jane but I have watched this video and some others on Dresageclinic.com I do not see how "newbie" dressage riders would be encouraged to "yank on their horse's mouth". She repeatedly explains that it is not to be a backwards pull. Understanding the contact, I believe, is learning the balance between the outside rein and the suppling inside rein. You clearly hear her correct riders that only pull back, or lose the outside rein entirely. So while it is always good to get actual lessons and not rely completely on "virtual", Jane is absolutely a good place to start and good place to come back to, always. If anything, repeated watching of her videos would INSTILL in a beginner the necessity of NOT pulling and yanking backwards.


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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pony418 View Post
    for larkspur...I have not ridden with Jane but I have watched this video and some others on Dresageclinic.com I do not see how "newbie" dressage riders would be encouraged to "yank on their horse's mouth". She repeatedly explains that it is not to be a backwards pull. Understanding the contact, I believe, is learning the balance between the outside rein and the suppling inside rein. You clearly hear her correct riders that only pull back, or lose the outside rein entirely. So while it is always good to get actual lessons and not rely completely on "virtual", Jane is absolutely a good place to start and good place to come back to, always. If anything, repeated watching of her videos would INSTILL in a beginner the necessity of NOT pulling and yanking backwards.
    FWIW some people have more success performing the exercise on a straight line. The straight line makes it very obvious when the rider is dropping the outside contact
    I wasn't always a Smurf
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  11. #31
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    Jun. 13, 2001
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    usa
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    When the rider is going straight ahead it is merely 'positioned inside'/seeing inside eyelashes (which may be only holding the inside rein an inch higher (or turning the thumb out) to align inside fore/inside hind(on the greener horse). More clearly the rider can change to a whisper of counter flexion. Both are calculated to direct the horse into the 'control' of the outside rein (re flexion). Traditionally a trained horse 'stands on the outside rein' (inside leg to outside rein) through corners, and on the inside rein (outside leg to inside rein) when going straight. Thus addressing both diagonal reactions and keeping the strenum lifted/horse telescoped/and especially horse straight.
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  12. #32
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    Mar. 22, 2011
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    Ontario
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    I tried this last night, what a WONDERFUL excercise. I will be adopting this into my regular routine.
    I really felt my mare lift her back and become spongy and supportive, her strides became swingy and larger and my "go" button was very responsive!

    One thing I found helped her, (she is 4 y/o), was a slightly wider hand.
    Later into my ride I found I was using this excercise less but still achieving the same result.



  13. #33
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    I can do +1/-1 but have trouble with getting a +7 correctly The simple +1/-1 flex also works to get focus & calm her down.



  14. #34
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by pony418 View Post
    for larkspur...I have not ridden with Jane but I have watched this video and some others on Dresageclinic.com I do not see how "newbie" dressage riders would be encouraged to "yank on their horse's mouth". She repeatedly explains that it is not to be a backwards pull. Understanding the contact, I believe, is learning the balance between the outside rein and the suppling inside rein. You clearly hear her correct riders that only pull back, or lose the outside rein entirely.
    Well, as you say, even the demo riders with Jane's help were having a hard time doing the exercise correctly, so it's easy to see how a green rider on an uneducated horse working alone can get it wrong.

    I don't know how else to explain it, except to say that if you flex your horse's neck to one side and the horse does not respond by softening the neck muscles on that side, you are not achieving anything, just exercising the wrong muscles.

    It's not about pulling back or dropping the outside rein or losing the contact. It's about the horse's response. When you ask for flexion, you do not soften to the horse until the horse first softens to you. This is such a basic and fundamental part of riding that I can't even believe I have to explain it. The video I posted explains it in under three minutes.



  15. #35
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by pony418 View Post
    for larkspur...I have not ridden with Jane but I have watched this video and some others on Dresageclinic.com I do not see how "newbie" dressage riders would be encouraged to "yank on their horse's mouth". She repeatedly explains that it is not to be a backwards pull. Understanding the contact, I believe, is learning the balance between the outside rein and the suppling inside rein. You clearly hear her correct riders that only pull back, or lose the outside rein entirely.
    Well, as you say, even the demo riders with Jane's help were having a hard time doing the exercise correctly, so it's easy to see how a green rider on an uneducated horse working alone can get it wrong.

    I don't know how else to explain it, except to say that if you flex your horse's neck to one side and the horse does not respond by softening the neck muscles on that side and stretching the other side, you are not achieving anything, just exercising the wrong muscles.

    It's not about pulling back or dropping the outside rein or losing the contact. It's about the horse's response. When you ask for flexion, you do not soften to the horse until the horse first softens to you. This is such a basic and fundamental part of riding that I can't even believe I have to explain it. The video I posted explains it in under three minutes.

    One thing Nancy says is that "for some horses it "is a major ordeal" to get them to just simply turn their head to the left or right. (I happen to have one like this -- extremely stiff and heavy neck and poll.)
    Last edited by LarkspurCO; Dec. 12, 2012 at 11:52 AM.



  16. #36
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    interesting video.



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