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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2007
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    4,051

    Default RIP Pulpit

    Pulpit died in his paddock today, per Blood Horse.

    It will be interesting to see what the presumed necropsy shows as cause of death. I saw him on my WEG trip in 2010, and he looked quite chunky to me. He was definitely a pretty boy, though. Gorgeous head.


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  2. #2
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    Jun. 18, 2007
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2008
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    1,087

    Default

    Very sad.

    I checked out your photos. Quite chunky is a nice way of putting it. I've never understood why they let these stallions get so fat. Some farms seem to take it very seriously, with constant weight monitoring and appropriate steps to maintain a healthy weight and others seem to see obesity as a sign of blooming health. Like a corupulent King or something.
    Hope whatever it was wasn't related to his weight because that would be a huge waste.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2004
    Location
    N. TX...just N.East of paradise...
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    2,026

    Default

    Always one of my fav stallions to drool over. Maybe I'll have a G'son of his some day...sad...
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    19,871

    Default

    My money is on ruptured aorta. For some reason it is relatively common with older stallions. Godspeed. He will be missed.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,904

    Default

    I was so sad to read Bloodhorse's report. We had a lovely Tapit son, Tap Room (now called Mischief Managed) that was amazingly laid back and sweet. He's now a hunter (didn't care for running) and loved by his new owner.

    RIP Pulpit.
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver, Equine Insurance Specialist



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2012
    Location
    MO
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    49

    Default

    Shane Sellers had a very heartfelt tribute to Pulpit on his FB page. He was his big horse and still had a big place in his heart,


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2007
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    Default

    I remember his run in the Derby in his year. He was my pick. I always wanted the Hancocks to get another Derby winner after losing Swale. Not that life is fair, but sometimes, you just wish it could be.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    2,796

    Default

    Wow. He was only 18?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2008
    Location
    Somewhere in Texas YEEHAW!
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    850

    Default

    Maybe it's just me, maybe it's just because these stallions are famous and it's reported about, and maybe it's just because they do more autopsy's on them because of their high value, but it just seems like a very common way for TB stallions to go and they seem to so often die in their teens. Seems far more common for a TB stallion to die of a heart attack in his teens than to live into his 20's and just pass on of old age (or maybe that really just means the same as dying of a heart attack, I'm not sure).

    Of course I know there are plenty of stallions who live to a ripe old age, but it seems far less common, especially considering the level of care these horses receive. Maybe it is because some farms let them become morbidly obese and give them limited turnout time (I agree with NCRider, I don't understand why they let these horses get so disgustingly fat, it's not pretty and it can't be healthy for them to be like that! What gives?)

    Am I just imagining it or are there any kind of stats to back this up?
    OTTB CONNECT
    FB group for all things related to non racing Thoroughbreds.. Click here to join ~~~> OTTB CONNECT



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2012
    Posts
    31

    Default

    RIP Pulpit

    I "know" a few of his foals, beautiful horses!! I actually know a bunch of his grand foals (Tapit babies) Beautiful horses!!

    RIP Pulpit
    ~Buy an OTTB, Save a Life, Gain a Forever Bond.~
    Let's say NO to Kill Buyers



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeBreeze View Post
    Maybe it's just me, maybe it's just because these stallions are famous and it's reported about, and maybe it's just because they do more autopsy's on them because of their high value, but it just seems like a very common way for TB stallions to go and they seem to so often die in their teens. Seems far more common for a TB stallion to die of a heart attack in his teens than to live into his 20's and just pass on of old age (or maybe that really just means the same as dying of a heart attack, I'm not sure).

    Of course I know there are plenty of stallions who live to a ripe old age, but it seems far less common, especially considering the level of care these horses receive. Maybe it is because some farms let them become morbidly obese and give them limited turnout time (I agree with NCRider, I don't understand why they let these horses get so disgustingly fat, it's not pretty and it can't be healthy for them to be like that! What gives?)

    Am I just imagining it or are there any kind of stats to back this up?

    There have been a few articles and studies done about aortic ruptures in stallions. One theory mentioned is high blood pressure. A lot of the test stallions had passed away during or just after breeding.

    Especially these TB stallions that have big books of mares. They are often not kept fit , then expected to breed an abnormal amount of mares a few months a year.

    A stallion in nature might cover a few mares a few times a year not 100 +
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"


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