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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
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    12,861

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    Quote Originally Posted by gully's pilot View Post
    Update: I spent the entire day and $300, and learned nothing.

    His blood work was normal, as was his neuro exam and all other physical findings. This effectively rules out viruses, including all the funky encephalitises, and it rules out toxins like poisonous plants and other liver problems, which can apparently cause seizures.

    They took blood for an epm titre; if that comes back high (it'll take a few days) they'll check his spinal fluid. Otherwise, we just wait to see if it happens again.

    I so love this.

    Better than if they found something you couldn't fix. But also understand the frustration of no diagnosis. Fingers crossed for no EPM...and no further Seizures!!!!!
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    632

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    There is a QH mare at my barn that went through this some years back, and they never could find a reason either. Her seizures were triggered by putting a halter or bridle on, and if I remember correctly they occurred for two years, but only in the fall/early winter. She went to the university clinic and they did every diagnostic test under the sun and found nothing. She hasn't had a problem since, and it's been years. If I see her owner I'll ask her for all the details again and whether there ever was a best guess as to what was going on.



  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,441

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    I am agreeing with Frugalannie, $300 seems cheap for all that, and though you do not have an answer yet I am going with no news is good news.



  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2003
    Location
    Bristol, TN
    Posts
    1,720

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    You all are right, in the clear light of morning I can see it truly is good news. Yesterday, after a miserable trip in driving rain both ways, I was so tired and frazzled by the time I got home. I typed my update really quickly then rushed off to dress up for a holiday party I no longer felt like attending. My husband kept saying, "That's great! It's all good!" and I kept saying, "But I wanted an answer!" Finally he said, "Would you have wanted an answer if it was a bad answer?" and I recognized that my biggest fear the whole way to Knoxville was that I would be driving home with an empty trailer.

    Gully's whole decline has been heart-breaking for me. I learned so much from and with him; his generous heart always seemed attuned to mine. I'm loving my new horse very much, but I wasn't ready to stop riding Gully. I always wanted to be a better rider for him.

    Thanks for all your jingles, kind words, and advice.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2002
    Location
    Southern Pines, NC
    Posts
    328

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    Finally he said, "Would you have wanted an answer if it was a bad answer?" and I recognized that my biggest fear the whole way to Knoxville was that I would be driving home with an empty trailer.

    You have a great husband! What a super response. Jingles.



  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2009
    Location
    Gray Court, SC
    Posts
    813

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    Quote Originally Posted by gully's pilot View Post
    You all are right, in the clear light of morning I can see it truly is good news. Yesterday, after a miserable trip in driving rain both ways, I was so tired and frazzled by the time I got home. I typed my update really quickly then rushed off to dress up for a holiday party I no longer felt like attending. My husband kept saying, "That's great! It's all good!" and I kept saying, "But I wanted an answer!" Finally he said, "Would you have wanted an answer if it was a bad answer?" and I recognized that my biggest fear the whole way to Knoxville was that I would be driving home with an empty trailer.
    I've been following since my first post and also am glad that the basics all seem good. I can really connect with your frustration about not knowing, but differ only in this, knowing means I can deal with what ever it is, not continue as a weight on the heart for worrying what it could be. Right now my insides are all miserable as I try to cope with my pony problem.

    I have this wonderful, dear sweet pony whom I got as a companion to my retired mare while I run off and play with Sterling. Little did Clover know that she would soon be back to teaching my SO riding and dressage. For two years we had fun going to shows, smack talking, and cheering when Clover beat out Sterling in an equitation class.

    Then she strained her check ligament,
    Then she got overweight from lack of exercise and stupid owner not understanding how to manage it

    I have knowledgeable people tell me to limit feed, muzzle to help her lose weight, then she gets the muzzle caught on a bucket, rips the muzzle off, but now has problems dropping her head down to feed. She got listless from lack of food, because I tried to do the right thing and now she has a mystery limp. I feel like an utter failure, because I don't know what to do, because I don't know what is wrong or how to fix it (and there are times when I ask should I even have horses since I can't seem to take proper care of one).

    Recently I got rid of the muzzle, regulated her hay with a nibble bag, and that seems to help for her eyes are brighter and she is complaining about the closed gate when the other two go out to the pasture and she is losing weight (a little).

    I say all this maybe to get it off my chest, I feel like I am letting this dear pony down, because I don't know how or why her back leg is sore. I'd rather know and deal with the problem then fret and worry. Today we travel to a local barn for her to see a Vet, but if I don't get an answer I will take her somewhere I CAN get an answer. GP, I really understand the frustration and hope you do ultimately get to the root and can work to help get Gully well again. Jingles to Gully, you and your family.



  7. #67
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2003
    Location
    Northeast MA
    Posts
    4,065

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    Gully and JP60 (and everyone facing vet issues), jingles for your horses, and pats on the back for you. Horses will always come up with another way to "teach" us more about veterinary medicine than we thought we'd need to know. And I think the longer you own them, the more it happens. Maybe we need a "OMGiH!* What's going on here?" thread so we can all vent about our frustrating (often mystery) health issues with our horses.

    I think one of the hardest things is for we, the owners and caregivers of these horses, to keep a positive outlook. I swear horses know when we feel defeated and they reflect it.

    And we all need to congratulate ourselves for being able to maintain our athletes to an age when issues occur. Think of the equine management skills it takes to get through year!

    * for new COTHers, OMGiH stands for Oh Mein Gott in Himmel, a favorite of one of COTHs most notable posters, the late Willem. Check his posts out on the "Favorites" forum. They are worth a read.
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,492

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    Unnerving as it might be...just remember the old adage..."No news is good news!!" Hope that's true and his seizure was just an unexplained thing. Crossing fingers for you.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    632

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    GP- Saw the owner the other day of the QH mare I mentioned upthread. The best guess was that her mare had damaged a nerve in her poll/head from wearing a cribbing collar that had become twisted and wasn't noticed for a few days. Vets thought mare had a pressure point trigger for the seizures. When the vet palpated her neck and head, she hit one spot and the mare fell straight down into a grand mal seizure. Putting on or taking off the halter would trigger the seizures, so they just left the halter on her all the time, which didn't cause any problems. She had seizures for two years after, but only in the winter, which no one has an explanation for. It's been years now, and mare has not had any problems since.

    You mentioned Gully wears a grazing muzzle- any chance the strap of that or of the halter could be pinching or rubbing a pressure point in his poll or face? Hope he's doing better and that he'll have the same good outcome as my friend's mare.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,743

    Default Jingles & ((hugs)) for Gully and his family ~

    Jingles & ((hugs)) for Gully and his family ~

    growing old is no fun ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



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