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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2010
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    78

    Default What are the options for this horse? *UPDATE: Placed!*

    **UPDATE**
    The horse has been placed! Thanks to the suggestions and reach of this wonderful board and the kindness and openness of one particular heart, the horse has been placed!

    Original thread-----------------------------------------------

    To make an extremely long story (somewhat) short, my family owns an 'investment' horse and are currently struggling to figure the best possible future for him-- for his quality of life, and also for us financially.

    The horse in question is absolutely high-quality animal-- imported from Denmark, branded Danish WB with good jumping bloodlines, beautiful hunter movement, imposing presence (gorgeous neck, soft eye, great tail!), and SCOPEY. Could have been a 6 figure horse.

    However, about a year ago he coliced. Within 24 hours, he was given 2 colic surgeries and miraculously pulled through. However, he has since developed a LARGE hernia on his belly from the surgery incision. It is about the size of nerf football. The vets say they can fix it with surgery (a mesh-type installment).

    But at this point, my parents (who have paid for this horse so many times over that there is no possibility of ever making a profit) have sunk so much money that they are unsure if they can afford the surgery and the rehab, and then still have the costs of showing, marketing, etc. associated with getting him sold. I know this sounds horrible and that they are uncaring, but they truly are at the end of their rope. Before this he was proving to be a difficult sell due to some 'baby' horse spookiness-- so even before this whole mess, he was accumulating a lot of fees and causing anxiety.

    Right now he is unrideable. His quality of life, while simple and carefree (turnout, stall, turnout, stall...) cannot be too great, IMO. The vets don't think the hernia causes him pain, but it must be uncomfortable?

    What i'm asking is-- what are the options for this horse? He is young-- only 9.
    He COULD potentially be made back into a competition horse (jumping, or I could see him going dressage-- he is NICE!) once he had the surgery.
    Is there possibility of marketing him as a give-a-way, with potential? If someone was willing to take the chance on him, this could be the deal of the century...
    We looked into donation, but since he is not rideable at the point that is limited. Does anyone know of other donation programs, that would have a purpose for him?

    Any other suggestions?

    I know this sounds like we are giving up on the problem, but this situation is so complex and has been going on for such a long time. We truly want the best for this horse-- but cannot ignore our financial constraints and lack of resources. We have looked into many donation options already, but no luck. We want to ensure he is happy, in whatever is the best way possible-- but we truly are at our wits end in figuring out what that will look like.
    Last edited by Cava Pony; Feb. 9, 2013 at 10:14 PM.


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Connecticut
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    Default

    I know of someone who had an eventing horse who needed big dollar surgery for a lameness issue. They were tapped out but found someone who would give the horse the vet work it needed. They gave her the horse on the condition she followed through, which she did, and now she owns a very nice eventing horse! Start tracking back into your own show/training community network, and hopefully you will find someone who would be willing to do the same for you. Good luck!
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2007
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    Default

    You might find somebody who would put up for the surgery if you lowered sale price way down. What would hernia fix cost?



  4. #4
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    The type of hernia repair he needs costs what?? My mare had a hernia repair as a yearling, but it wasn't as complicated as your sounds.

    I do not believe that it causes any pain either unless there is some sort of drop through w/ the intestine. He could live as a pasture puff the rest of his life w/o complications most likely but I doubt any veterinarian would clear him for work with such a hernia.

    I think that if it were me, I'd research the cost of the surgery and go from there. If it is something that is truly out of your reach, then I think what Chief mentioned might be smart. Find someone who can see his potential and has a pocket book that can accommodate the surgery.

    Best wishes.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  5. #5
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    Feb. 7, 2005
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    Lancaster, PA
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    Default

    Give horse away, obviously with full disclosure of his medical history, to someone who is willing to pay for the surgery.


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2006
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    Maine
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    The hernia probably isn't painful. I think you could likely give him away to someone who was willing to pick up the surgery tab. If you haven't already, I would suggest getting a current estimate on the cost of hernia repair and then make a decision from there.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    SF Bay Area, California
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    Default

    Rather than simply hitting the green thumb for each of the above posts, I am going to chime in and say I absolutely agree with the solutions each poster before me has presented!
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Jun. 3, 2010
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    I would have to verify, but I believe the surgery will cost about $2000. It involves some sort of mesh apparatus, since the hernia is so large.

    And yes, in order to have any sort of riding future the hernia would need to be addressed. It seems such a waste to just resign him to being a pasture puff without seeing if anyone else has the resources to give him another chance.

    I obviously want to ensure he ends up in the right hands; any suggestions on where to look for potential homes?

    Thank you for your suggestions!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cava Pony View Post
    I would have to verify, but I believe the surgery will cost about $2000. It involves some sort of mesh apparatus, since the hernia is so large.

    And yes, in order to have any sort of riding future the hernia would need to be addressed. It seems such a waste to just resign him to being a pasture puff without seeing if anyone else has the resources to give him another chance.

    I obviously want to ensure he ends up in the right hands; any suggestions on where to look for potential homes?

    Thank you for your suggestions!

    Try the COTH giveaway forum on here. I bet you'd get some interest in him. Shoot, if I were in the market for a horse and had the money (which I'm not and I don't), I'd be interested. It could be a hell of a deal, but it does come with some risk so you will of course have to give full disclosure. And remember to get a signed contract / bill of sale (for $1 if you are giving him away).
    "People ask me 'will I remember them if I make it'. I ask them 'will you remember me if I don't?'"



  10. #10
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    Jun. 3, 2010
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    Yes, we would certainly give full disclosure-- as well as the chance to talk with the vets prior to discuss the likely outcomes, etc. before someone would have to make a decision.

    I will look into posting on the giveaway forum. I just want to make sure he is given away safely and won't meet some sad ending. We really do want the best for this horse.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2004
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    The hospital I work for has good results using the CM Heal Hernia Belt:
    http://www.cmequineproducts.com/id23.html

    May or may not help your situation depending on the exact size/location of the hernia, but worth a look. Less invasive than surgery, though the belt isn't cheap. If you go this route, make sure you get a hefty pad to go with it. Their pad, or a large western saddle pad will help prevent topline sores (you have to strap the belt very tight, a poofy english square pad just won't hold up).



  12. #12
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    May. 5, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cava Pony View Post
    I obviously want to ensure he ends up in the right hands; any suggestions on where to look for potential homes?

    Thank you for your suggestions!
    The first place I would look to would be my own horse community. If your parents had the connections to import this horse as a resell project, couldn't they tap into the same community they intended to market the horse in? Sell him for $1.00 and stipulate in the sales contract that the new owner must address the hernia within a certain time frame.

    It sounds like the cost of the hernia repair is low enough that someone would be interested in taking a chance on a really nice, other wise free horse.
    Sheilah



  13. #13
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    Try networking within Pony Club. They have some great riders, and great families with good values.

    My trainer has given away two horses (one a nice horse with a recurrent tumor in its hoof) to homes found through our regional Pony Club email list.


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  14. #14
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    Jan. 12, 2008
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cava Pony View Post
    Right now he is unrideable. His quality of life, while simple and carefree (turnout, stall, turnout, stall...) cannot be too great, IMO. The vets don't think the hernia causes him pain, but it must be uncomfortable?
    I agree with all of the above posts, but just wanted to add--sounds like a fine life for a horse. He is not out there in turnout thinking "Ya know, if I hadn't had that colic surgery I could be a famous jumper..."
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleozowner View Post
    I agree with all of the above posts, but just wanted to add--sounds like a fine life for a horse. He is not out there in turnout thinking "Ya know, if I hadn't had that colic surgery I could be a famous jumper..."

    Yep. I'm sure from a horse's perspective that's a much higher quality of life than being a jumper or dressage horse.

    However, from a monetary perspective...I'd consider giving him away or having him put down if he's an investment horse and not having the surgery means he's an even bigger money pit than he already is. If the surgery IS as cheap as $2000 (not a lot of on its own, but a lot if you're already piling it on thousands invested you're not going to recoup), you would probably find a giveaway home willing to take the chance on him.


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  16. #16
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    Jul. 5, 2007
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    I gave a yearling away to avoid paying for surgical gelding. He left my place, went straight to Cornell on the "buyer's" dime.

    So, yes, there are people who will take a chance on a horse who requires immediate cash layout with no guarantee of future soundness. The best people to "market" your horse to would be people who saw him ridden before he coliced and therefore know his potential.


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  17. #17
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    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Did he do anything show/ competition wise before his first colic surgery? It would be easier to market him if he was more than just a "pretty & unproven horse" the world is full of those. If he is 9 and hasn't done a darn thing, then to advertise as a giveaway may be your only option.

    Horses are a really risky investment.



  18. #18
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    Jun. 3, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleozowner View Post
    I agree with all of the above posts, but just wanted to add--sounds like a fine life for a horse. He is not out there in turnout thinking "Ya know, if I hadn't had that colic surgery I could be a famous jumper..."
    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Yep. I'm sure from a horse's perspective that's a much higher quality of life than being a jumper or dressage horse.

    However, from a monetary perspective...I'd consider giving him away or having him put down if he's an investment horse and not having the surgery means he's an even bigger money pit than he already is. If the surgery IS as cheap as $2000 (not a lot of on its own, but a lot if you're already piling it on thousands invested you're not going to recoup), you would probably find a giveaway home willing to take the chance on him.
    Yes, I agree-- I don't think he is UNHAPPY, per se. Just probably bored and frustrated. He can't be allowed out into the big field with his hernia, so is delegated to small turnout with that limits his ability to injure himself/strain his hernia. Due to constraints on the farm itself, he can't get full day t.o. So its really just a few hours outside, grooming, and then stall.

    The monetary thing is truly a limiting factor for us right now.

    Thank you all for the suggestions and the hope that there may be someone out there willing to take him on. I will pursue people in my own network-- that is probably a very likely source of home for him.

    But I also did post this on the giveaway forum; perhaps the right person will come by him that way. Also, there are quite a few people in my own network who frequent these boards, so just another way to get the word out.

    Here it is, for those interested: http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...nish-Warmblood


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  19. #19
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    Sep. 28, 2001
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    Kentucky
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    He is lovely! Including his height might also be helpful.

    I found someone that was willing to pay for the surgery in a similar situation. It did not work out for other reasons, but there are people out there who will be willing to take a chance on him.

    I hope he finds the perfect home.


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  20. #20
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    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    this horse is more than likely is in pain and really you should listen to his needs and not your own - as hes had 2 colic sugergies and hernia now hes unrideable and more than likely will have another colic episode this horse is high finance and high cost

    and all your doing is extending his agony- and he will only end up as meat in the end who ever has him cos no one in there right mind in this days economy is going to spend 2k on an op and possible more expense with future colic if he servives a horse thats unridable and for a very long time plus he wont be insurable either - so if he causing an accident with someone handling him or with other horses or if he did get ridden whos going to pay those bills for human or yard or horse whatever

    as you said the horse was a spooky behaviour- and no doubt still will be has it ever occcured to you this horse has always been in pain and thats why he behaves in the way he does when ridden - or handled

    horses only do things for a reason- and pain tyou can measure in a tea cup
    or say hes not in pain------- as judging by what your saying this horse has always been in pain------- so think


    yeah hes young and he may have come from good back ground- but some do interbreed and this is what you get as a result

    for the horses sake for your parents sake- do right by him so he doest have to suffer any more or know where his next meals are coming from not all horses make it to there teens let alone 20+ those that do ita bonus

    this way the horse is safe- the cost to parents ceases - and you have had him for the rest of his life and in that life he had the best care possible


    which you wont be able to say- if you let this horse go---------as it weont happen thats the reality as harsh as it is


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