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  1. #1
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    Default Best joint supplements for dogs?

    OK, Doggie peeps: what are your best suggestions for arthritic hips in a 12 YO English Setter? He's getting stovier.

    He eats Diamond Senior, sleeps on a Kuranda elevated dog bed when he's outside, and sleeps inside overnight year round on his very own sofa. What joint supplements would you suggest? He'll take a treat if there's a treat-based one you like. I know Rimadyl (Sp?) was recommended in years past but it's been years since I needed to know about old dog mgmt.

    PS I'm happy with Diamond. I know about the issues that occurred previously. If you'd like to suggest a different food, that's welcome info. Setting me on fire over his current food...notsomuch



  2. #2
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    When I had a dog with diagnosed arthritis in her neck and several problems due to that, we used this brand (I think this product is the evolution of what we used--it was nearly 10 years ago now.)

    She did WONDERFULLY on it, and when we tried to switch her to other supplements, she did poorly. If I had a dog with arthritis issues now, that's the first place I would go.

    That same dog also had a HUGE second wind when we switched her from an okay quality food (I think we fed Nutro?) to California Natural. It was like she was a puppy again. I'm not sure I'd recommend Cal Nat now, since Proctor & Gamble purchased them, but Acana would likely be an excellent place to go for you.



  3. #3
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    Default

    How about Cosequin? I know it's been around a while, and I've never known anyone who used it for either horses or dogs. Opinions?



  4. #4
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    Dasuquin is made by the Cosequin people and has a pretty attractive profile. I've used it, along with a HA supplement, in my more recent older dogs that did not have any known arthritis issues just to cover my bases. No complaints, and it was fairly inexpensive (about a buck a day?) but I can't say one way or the other if it really did anything.

    The K9 stuff, though, that I linked above has:

    2600 mg glucosamine sulfate
    2600 mg glucosamine HCL
    1000 mg chondroitin
    1000 mg MSM
    100 mg HA
    200 mg ascorbic acid

    Plus some weird blend of red algae, bromelian, boswellia and grape seed extract.

    And I do not think it was terribly expensive.

    Just looking at that makes me think I should pick some up for my current 8 yo dog. No problems with her, but wow, that really covers a lot.



  5. #5
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    My corgi was diagnosed w/hip dysplasia when he was 2. I started given him Cetyl M about 2 yrs ago. B4 that I just bought whatever they had at Petsmart, and gave him Rimadyl at least once a week. Since he's been on the CM I don't think I've given him Rimadyl even once a month.
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  6. #6
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    My 12ish collie mix gets Dasuquin and fish oil capsules (supplements) and Rimadyl (NSAID), with Tramadol (pain reliever) as needed. She started off with just Dasuquin, added the NSAID and pain reliever as the arthritis got worse. With this mix, she trots sound most of the time, a little limpy sometimes, and can lose a step on stairs.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 9, 2003
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    Default

    Another vote for Dasuquin. You know you're getting what's labelled with Nutramax products. Can't say the same for the others!

    Rimadyl is an NSAID that you have to get via vet prescription, btw!



  8. #8
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    Jan. 9, 2003
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    I use Cosequin. I've been able to take my 12 1/2 yo Aussie off rimadyl since I started her on Cosequin. That said, with my vets permission, I just use the powder that I buy for the horses and downsize the dose for the dog.
    Last edited by Holly Jeanne; Dec. 4, 2012 at 01:09 PM. Reason: typo
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  9. #9
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    Default

    An ortho vet I used to work for recommended a mix of supplements: 1 gram fish oil, 500 mgs of glucosamine, 400 units of Vitamin E, and 500 mg of Vitamin C (not the chewable). I give up 1000 mgs of glucosamine when we're riding and the old dog is getting stiff after a ride. This mix worked just fine for many many dogs, including my own. MSM is a huge help too. I just buy the human tablets and give them in a treat, no problems.

    Mine's a 13 year old golden/aussie and she's going strong.

    Dasuquin is crazy expensive for what it is! wow...



  10. #10
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    I have seen a dramatic change in my male doberman on Cosequin DS. Same in my MIL's lab. It took a few weeks of the loading dose for him and a full month for her though (just so you know it can take awhile).

    I've never had any results like this on any oral horse supps, btw.
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  11. #11
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    hmm, I have this from Ani Med- their Hip Help powder...I used it for Noodle but forgot I had it...


    Each Ounce Contains (min): Glucosamine HCL 1500mg, MSM 1765mg, Creatine 1000mg, Vitamin C 1000mg, Vitamin E 875IU

    1 tsp per 25lbs body weight twice daily for 14 days. Then 1 tsp per 25lbs body weight daily as a maintenance dose. Mix with normal food ration.

    I could add the fish oil? Does that sound reasonable?


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  12. #12
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    Default

    Sounds reasonable to me! I'm sure you'll get more information on the topic too.



  13. #13
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    I use Grand HA Synergy (its for horses but has a labeled doseage for dogs on it) for my dogs. One is a fat aussie cross (gets lots of exercise, appropriate sized dinner, but she cleans up after everyone else!) who can be ouchy in one hip, my 3 yr old good weight terrier who occasionally pops his knee out (ouch!!!), our 11 yr old chihuahua cross as a preventive, and our 4 yr old cat who has a bad leg (due to bad vet diagnosis - thanks doc!). The aussie cross doesn't limp when on it, the terrier hasn't had his knee pop in ages, and I am hoping it will be a good preventive for the other two.



  14. #14
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    standard "arthritis" treatment for dogs, listed in order of importance:
    1) keep them thin, skinny, no excess body weight to haul around
    2) keep them active and well-muscled. Swimming, walking up hills, keep them moving.
    3) feed them lots of fish oil- 3 mg of fish body oil per 100 grams of dry kibble fed.
    4) feed a non-inflammatory diet with high protein, moderate fat and low carbs. This means kind of the opposite of Diamond Senior, which is a high-carb low-fat diet that is mostly grains.
    5) feed a cocktail of glucosamine, chondroitin, HA, and MSM.
    6) if the above doesn't produce satisfactory results, considering trying adequan injections, or cetyl-M, or durlactin.
    7) if the above doesn't produce satisfactory results, consider adding an NSAID.
    8) if that doesn't work, and the dog has hip dysplasia, consider surgery.

    the best all-in-one joint cocktails I've seen are Hylasport Canine, Arthrisoothe Gold, and Smartpaks's Smartcanine line. I'm sure there are others out there.



  15. #15
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    http://www.diamondpet.com/products/d...8_dog_formula/

    I don't see the normal 'bad' grains in that feed profile. What is considered a better carb/fat ratio?

    He is lean. No fat on that dog. He lives outside and is a very active dog. He gets plenty of exercise.
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  16. #16
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    I don't see the normal 'bad' grains in that feed profile. What is considered a better carb/fat ratio?
    rice is indeed one of the "better" of the grains for dogs, because it's very digestible, but it's considered pro-inflammatory. See the inflammation factor box? http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...d-pasta/5716/2

    If I had a dog without arthritis issues, I'd generally prefer rice as the carb source; but with an inflammatory issue like arthritis, it might help to switch to sweet potato or oats or tapioca.

    But that's not the real concern- rice is certainly acceptable- the real concern is the high carb content of the diet. Your diet provides about 46% of its calories from carbohydrates, which is excessively high for a canine, particularly a senior canine. Seniors need more protein than younger dogs. The only dogs who really need carbs are young, very active dogs, and even then the carbs should be providing no more than around 30% of the calories in the diet. For a senior dog with arthritis, I'd aim at providing less than 20% of the calories from carbs, preferably from a non-inflammatory source.
    So look for a kibble with a "normal" fat level listed on the bag of around 20%, and a protein level of at least 35%, preferably higher, and a non-inflammatory carb source.



  17. #17
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    cool, great info. THanks !!



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