The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default Indentation above the eye socket bulges while eating

    Still learning: just noticed an indentation above the horses' eye socket that bulges with hay chewing. Normally (without chewing) this is a socket shape but it bulges out like a squeezed water balloon with hay chewing. Some have it more pronounced than others. Can anybody shed some light on this? I am wondering why I haven't noticed this before. Is a larger bulge of any concern?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,989

    Default

    The bulge is larger on a young horse, it becomes less pronounced to non existent as they age.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,283

    Default

    I've noticed it on one of my horses.. the fat one. The Aged TB has indentations/hollows above his eyes, which I associate with being dehydrated.
    Somehow with the fat one, I have a feeling it's an allergy to soy. He also has a bit of a breathing problem. This is completely an un medical opinion. It does bother me, I don't like it. This horse also recently developed uveitis.
    I'd love to hear others opinions/ experiences.
    Sometimes it looks like he has ping pong balls above his eyes while he is chewing.
    PS he is 25 now.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    5,752

    Default

    Perfectly normal, just more pronounced on some horses than others. It is less obvious in horses with fleshier heads than those with 'dry' heads, that is the only difference I have observed, and that is over a range of ages
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2003
    Location
    Baldwin, MD
    Posts
    617

    Default

    That's totally normal! It's just the soft tissues above the very tippy top of their mandible moving. It doesn't mean anything, and there is nothing wrong.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Very normal. No need to worry.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2003
    Location
    St Aug, Fla
    Posts
    3,812

    Default

    I have seen when my horses needed to have their teeth floated (and previously had been done not so well) and I did not really notice the bulge moving. My dentist said that when they are able to masticate properly with the slide and lift movement, it allows everything to move as it should which will cause the bulge to go in and out. And I did watch my mare and gelding before being floated and after and it really did become more pronounced after the float and stayed like that weeks and months later. I guess it makes sense though - if there are waves and hooks that are keeping the jaws from sliding and going together correctly, then the jaw muscles cant work as they should.
    ~~~~~~~~~

    Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
    Location
    Almost Aiken
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    Old horses have a more pronounced dip there and less of a bulge while chewing because they start to lose fat deposits as they age, and that's one of the places that fat loss shows up.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    You can see them when they drink...with the ears bobbing. I always think it is cute.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,802

    Default

    I use it to my advantage when clipping the head. I give them something to chew (treat/carrot) and clip that spot when it bulges out. makes it much easier to do cleanly.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2009
    Posts
    134

    Default

    when I dissected a head the other week we got to see what that bulge is- it's just a pocket full of nice yellow fatty tissue in the space where the jaw bone inserts into the head, or the cornoid process of the mandible as some may call it! So it makes sense, as the jaw moves, the bones move and it pushes the fatty tissue out.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2012
    Posts
    62

    Default

    This might be really dumb, but I always wondered if that was the equivalent of our temple because of the way it moves like that. If you put your fingers on your temple and bite down, a similar but less visible 'bulge' motion occurs.

    Any explanations?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2001
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,116

    Default

    Yes, it's the equivalent of your temple. That space - in your head AND your horse's head - is there on purpose to give the chewing apparatus room to move while chomping away.
    Disclaimer: My mom told me that people might look at my name and think I had an addiction other than horses. I don't; his name was Bravado.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    Posts
    913

    Default

    What is even more fascinating is that the eyeballs also can bulge in and out while chewing. You can see it more on some horses than others and while their head is up. Once you see it you'll start noticing all the time. Creepy...



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Thanks for all the insights and additional observations!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,490

    Default

    If you look at your horse long enough there apper to be all sorts of bumps that apparently were not there before - except that they were. Hocks in particular seem to give me (unfounded) anxiety.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    If you look at your horse long enough there apper to be all sorts of bumps that apparently were not there before - except that they were. Hocks in particular seem to give me (unfounded) anxiety.
    What's your secret? Every time I see a bump, I think "Oh, that was there all along," but of course it turns out that it wasn't there all along, and the horse actually has a sprained spavin or 3rd-degree gaskinitis or an abscessed homonculus.
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,123

    Default

    If the socket above the eye bulges out when the horse is not eating I believe it is a sign of Cushings.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,712

    Default

    The coronoid process movement is what you're seeing.
    If I've gotten the photo upload to work, it's labelled.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	skull.jpg 
Views:	209 
Size:	79.9 KB 
ID:	37294  
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    The bulge is larger on a young horse, it becomes less pronounced to non existent as they age.
    Hey, this is good to know. I've always noticed it on the horses, obviously tied into the jaw, but my 3 year old is REALLY big when he chews compared to, say, the 7 year old. Of course, he's really big-boned all around, so I just figured it's his big old cheeks or jaw.
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou



Similar Threads

  1. Indentation on neck from ill fitting collar?
    By Grace67 in forum Driving
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Apr. 16, 2012, 09:54 AM
  2. Hen not eating
    By saratoga in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Apr. 28, 2011, 04:15 PM
  3. Funky bulges on cannon bone-boots?
    By Martina in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May. 26, 2010, 11:20 AM
  4. What are YOU eating?
    By hollynanne in forum Off Course
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Jan. 18, 2010, 11:06 AM
  5. Eating mud??!!
    By Flipper in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jun. 23, 2009, 01:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness