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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2004
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    Ct
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    So sorry you are going through this. We just put our old dog down two weeks ago, so I sympathise with what you're going through. Many hugs to you.....



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
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    The Prairie
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    My equine vet has twice euth dogs at home for us, each time it was a very positive experience. First time we put an old sleeping bag on our bed and that was where he euthed our Vizsla (she loved being in bed) She did urinate a bit but it did not soak through the sleeping bag. When she had pass we were able to bundle her up in it and put her in the car to take to the crematorium.

    Second one he did on her dog bed, a chocolate lab. She also urinated a bit but it did not soak through the dog bed. We picked up the dog bed and carried her to the car.

    Each time there were other dogs present, but confined to another room. They were allowed to sniff the body afterward, the lab sort of sniffed the Vizla and I don't remember much more about it.

    The lab herself was euthed about 2 years ago, her suriving partner is a Golden Retriever who certainly lightened the mood. Golden was confined to another room. After the lab passed my vet solemnly and ceremoniosuly stated "all right, let's allow Golden to visit with his friend and learn of her passing". We opened bed room door and the exuberant Golden was so excited to see her friend the vet he gave the lab a very cursory sniff then bounced around all tail wagging joy. We could not help but laugh.

    He did seem out of sorts after the fact but at the time I don't think he "got it". He has never been the sharpest hound in the kennel.

    Sorry you are going through this, my sympathy.
    Last edited by Mozart; Dec. 3, 2012 at 06:48 PM.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    227

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    I had my Dobie put down at home, in the den, in her doggie bed. No issues with messes or anything - and we were able to pick up the bed with her in it and carry it outside to her grave.

    We let the other dogs sniff her, but I don't think they got it. Or I couldn't tell that they did, at least.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,086

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    ~~~HUGS~~~~

    I hope all has gone smoothly for you.
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    20,388

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    I had my last dog done at home. It was definitely less stressful for all involved although she did get nervous and try to get away from me when the vet crouched down. He tranqed her IM then waited a few minutes for it to kick in before putting her down. She was very relaxed by that time. He grabbed a hand towel out of the bathroom and crammed it between her hind legs before I had a chance to stop him so that got thrown away with her. My barn owners were kind enough to let us bury her on their farm which was her favorite place in the world. I would definitely do it the same way if the opportunity presented itself. Godspeed.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2001
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    4,431

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    Sending you a hug. So sorry for the loss of your young dog.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2004
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    If I have any control at all in the situation, it will always be at home. I think it's more peaceful and relaxing for everyone involved, except maybe for the vet? It would be interesting to know which type they prefer.
    I've euthanized two of my dogs at home, one at advanced age, one with advanced Lymphoma. The first time I had no other dog, the second time I allowed the other dog to sniff him when it was over and he was like "Oh, ok..get me outta here". As far as it being a "mess" if you have it done in the house, put a blanket under your dog, and do it in a non carpeted area. It's an extremely small burden to have a bit of a mess to deal with when you're euthanizing a beloved dog, do it where the dog will be comfortable.
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,983

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    Sending hugs! We wanted to have my oldest euthanized at home but we were taken by surprise when he went into congestive heart failure (much earlier than we expected) and we went to the animal hospital. However, we did bring his body home and let our other dog sniff it (and let the kids give him a final pet) and I do think it helped all of them come to terms with his death.

    I have only been present for two dogs, a cat and two horses for euthanasia, but I don't think either of the dogs peed or pooped at all, so I wouldn't really worry about that.

    Anyway, you are probably already on the other side of this....hope all went as well as it could go, and that your pup is enjoying a second life on the other side of that bridge now....



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
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    Chrism, your tone sucks. I don't need a lecture.

    The horrid wind died down by the time the vet came so it was just under 60 degrees and she was very happy to hop out and greet them (high as a kite on opiates) and be admired. We ambled over to where her buddy was outside in the dog run and I had a blanket that she sat on, until she gently laid down and passed away. The vet was great, told her what a good girl she was when I couldn't talk anymore and so on.

    We let the boy out and he was much more interested in sniffing for bunnies than her.

    Thank you guys for the kind words.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,372

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    Many hugs for you tonight. I'm glad it was a peaceful passing. Your vet sounds great.

    ((hugs))

    FWIW, I don't think Chism meant any harm, was just saying that it can be worked around inside because I had mentioned that it could be messy and that might be difficult for you later. Hell, I had a total break down last Friday night when I came home to another mess. Crying jag and everything. Sometimes (for me at least) cleaning up just makes it worse because you're reminded that things are kind of sucky.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  11. #31
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    Mar. 9, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    Chrism, your tone sucks. I don't need a lecture.
    I'm not sure what "tone" you're getting, except for my comment about the possible mess, and it wasn't directed at anyone in particular. I'm sorry you took it that way. I'm sure you're quite upset about your dog and I'm sorry for your loss.
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Quote Originally Posted by chism View Post
    I'm not sure what "tone" you're getting, except for my comment about the possible mess, and it wasn't directed at anyone in particular. I'm sorry you took it that way. I'm sure you're quite upset about your dog and I'm sorry for your loss.
    You are right. I am sorry for being a b&tch. Bad day.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    I'm so sorry, Pumpkn, and thank you for this thread.

    I lost my little brown terrier, Abbie, last night at home. She passed on her own - she'd been having intermittent internal bleeding episodes for the past couple of months. The vet couldn't find the source of the bleeding, which was probably some kind of internal tumor. At fifteen years of age, we weren't going to put her through a lot of diagnostics.

    Anyway, she had a lot of good days interspersed with some bad. Sunday and even yesterday morning were relatively good ones. But then yesterday evening she passed away, on the couch, with DH and me beside her.

    I let Faith border collie and Scot the bc/pyr cross sniff her, but not Violet border collie. Vi is sadly one of those bc who obsess over certain other dogs, and Vi was obsessed with Abbie. Staring, gripping when she got the chance, etc. So for years I kept them mostly separated.

    The dogs who got the chance to see Abbie seem OK with her passing. But Vi is looking very distressed and searching. I haven't buried Abbie yet - it was late when she passed so we are doing this tonight.

    I wonder if I should let Violet see the body before we inter?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    More hugs (()) TrotTrot.

    pAin't, I'm sorry for your loss as well. I don't think it's too late. I would let Violet see her. It may help, it may not, but it won't hurt anything.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post
    I wonder if I should let Violet see the body before we inter?
    Yes, I would. Our 10 year old dog only took a brief sniff at his 14 year old companion's body but I feel that it really did make sense to him. His expression changed for a few moments (I don't know that it is correct to say he looked "sad" per se, but that's how it looked to me). But afterwards, he seemed ok. He did not look for his buddy, and his attitude toward our new puppy (who we had only had for a week) changed immediately. (He had previously decided he would just pretend we didn't have a new puppy... )

    I don't think it will hurt to let her see the body, even if she doesn't seem to respond much.

    So sorry for your loss.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    Thanks, y'all. I'm going to do that this afternoon.

    Pumpkn - I'm so glad your girl got to be at home at the end. I've put dogs and cats down at the vet and it's always so sad to me that their last moments are spent somewhere they feel afraid. I had a vet who would do in-home euthanasia and called him for my Great Dane. Definitely a better experience for all concerned - as much as such a sad event can be anyway.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
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    FUP comment on my other dobe, Sinte'. He was in the run next to her when we put Zelda down. He was pretty oblivous, doing his happy, dopey thing--just ready to get out and go chase stuff. After the vet left, we let him out so he could sniff her if he wanted to. He gave her a brief sniff about a foot away and then took of tracking some unseen foe.

    I thought, "that's cool, that's kind of what I expected."

    We went back into the house for an hour and then we couldn't take the silence. I went to the bathroom for the first time alone in years. Z is was the epitome of the "velcro" doberman. She was also a constant, in-your-face "ball, ball, ball, tug, play tug, play tug, lick,lick,lick,lick,lick, pet my butt, pet my butt, play tug" 24x7 presence (high drive dog) and the boys (2 cats and Sinte') are old and chill. So we crated Sinte' and left for a few hours.

    When I got home and let him out he searched the entire house, inch by inch, following her scent trail (skipped the rooms she hadn't been in). This is completely abnormal behavior for him. SAD!! I really don't think he got that she was "dead" when he saw the body?? She's been so medicated, maybe he just thought she was sleeping outside and the euthanasia injection was just one more new smell?

    The good news is he is used to being separated from her. She was the dog I took to training clinics, obedience trials & classes and he is a rescue we got as an older dog that is much less stressed just staying home alone, so he just doesn't have that attachment that dogs that grow up together have (in my experience).

    I will say I've seen more of my white cat (whom Z was just itching to kill if I'd let her) since she passed than I did the entire week before.

    I'm sorry P'aint for your loss. Hug! I would let the dog see the body too.

    One more thing. They didn't use sedative. I thought it WAS because it wasn't pink, which is cool because I kept it together not knowing it was the euthanasia fluid, which was good for her and she really was not worried. She was watching a squirrel (her arch nemisis). She had obstruction surgery in March, and lived at the clinic for awhile, and is very socialized, so she is just pretty cool about injections and being handled by strangers. And, if I tell her "it's ok, you're a good girl" then she thinks it is--it's just how we worked. (ok now I'm crying at work). She was such a momma's baby. So even without the sedative it went perfectly well nonetheless.

    I think I would pay a fortune to do them all at home.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2004
    Location
    east of oklahoma city
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    249

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    So happy for you that it went well. It's never easy, even when it's essential. But you did it right, and offered that final compassion even if it was more difficult on you. Thank you.
    I've had two of mine euthanized here at the house and wouldn't with to do it any differently. I can't say that I actually had a choice, but given the choice I wouldn't have done anything differently. Both were quite large dogs, and neither were in any condition to be moved: the first was a weimaraner that had already been diagnosed with osteosarcoma before I adopted him whose affected leg essentially blew up, and the second a seriously oversized dalmation I had for 14 years when his rear end just totally gave out on him. In both cases, my vet made an emergency trip, knowing the dogs well and not even questioning a farm call. Both were put down where they were, with the other dogs and the outside cats keeping what can only be called a respectful vigil. Even the horses were lined up along the fence, keeping watch, when it was Dillon the dal's time. There was no excitement, no bad behavior - just a quiet, respectful gathering of the clan. And yes, in both cases, the other critters visited and sniffed the body before I set about burying my friends. Dillon's best friend, Chester the Aussie, actually lay down next to Dillon and rested his head on his body for a bit, eyes closed.... and that's when I choked up. Nope, wouldn't have it any other way.
    Arendal Arabians and Sanctuary



  19. #39
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    Mar. 4, 2010
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    TrotTrotPumpkn - I'm so glad things went as well as they did. Hopefully Jake's time will be as peaceful.

    I feel guilty because I'm already looking on Petfinder for a rescue dobe I can bring home. I just can't imagine life without a doberman.

    StG


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Feb. 4, 2002
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    Oh TTP - sorry that you are going through this {{hugs}}.

    I had one cat PTS here at my house, on my dining room table after she got her tranquilizer. I locked my other cat in a bedroom as I wasn't sure what best to do. He seemed to notice he was alone immediately afterwards but seeing as he didn't love his 'sister' that much, he actually seemed happier.

    Now, we are coming to the end of his life and I'll do the same. I have no other pets so it'll just be the cat and the vet and tech and me.

    As long as I can, I will always do at home euthanasia. It is so much more comforting to be in your own surroundings and I think easier on your pet.
    ~* Life is the dance you choose *~



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