The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,029

    Default Typical cost to breed and raise a foal

    From those that have bred and raised their own foal, what were the typical costs from inception to weaning? This is assuming that everything went swimmingly.

    I sat down today and had a serious look at everything in regards to potentially breeding my mare, and want to get a good grasp of the costs beyond getting her in foal.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Would you be keeping the mare and foal at home or at someone else's facility?

    I think that's where is can really get expensive.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2009
    Posts
    523

    Default

    The "swimmingly" part is always the hard part- rarely do things ever go exactly as planned, from missed FedEx shipments to foaling issues to sick babies and everything in between it's good to have a broad understanding of everything that can (and often will) go wrong. Foals from inception to weaning (with your own place) can run as little as $6,500 and as much as $15,000 and often you have very little control over which end you fall closer too. There was a great thread this year that broke down costs (very detailed) which is extremely accurate and helpful and make sure you have access to a great repro vet - it can make all the difference in the world.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Posts
    748

    Default

    There was a great thread this year that broke down costs
    Do you remember how it was titled? I'd love to take a look at it!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,029

    Default

    She would continue to be boarded at her current facility as the BO has a lot of experience with breeding and raising foals as well as the facilities to safely do so.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2009
    Posts
    523

    Default

    If you don't have a facility - make sure to add on board for 18 months (getting pregnant, carrying, and nursing) plus I would assume a foal
    Watch fee as well as extra board for foal by side. Also look at what it will cost board wise to raise and then break/train a young horse - many weanlings do not sell as weaners! I will look for that thread - it was very realistic.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2012
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Stud fee and vet/insemination fees are the biggest costs of the breeding pending no health issues with mare/foal. If you pay board on your mare/foal this adds a lot more making it very costly unless you can board pretty cheap. Board is just "money out the window" on a foal. If you're breeding for yourself, it doesn't matter but if you're looking to sell without a $$ loss, I wouldn't recommend breeding and boarding your mare/foal.
    Last edited by woodland cottage; Dec. 15, 2012 at 01:52 PM.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,842

    Default

    There is a thread somewhere where I broke my costs for L down. It was rather mind blowing. Fresh semen, but three tries.

    The actual semen cost was one of the smaller ones, so buy the best semen for your particular mare and dont fret the cost of that, because in the end it is a fraction of what you will spend on getting a foal from conception to riding age. ;-)
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2012
    Location
    california
    Posts
    325

    Default

    of course the costs are also regional but here's the figures from the kitchen table:

    around: $10,640 based on the following figures:
    stud fee: 1500-2500
    fed ex/collection vet/frozen shipping container: 300-600
    mare board $300 x 18: 5400
    insemination: 400
    foaling: 600
    well baby checks: 80 x 3
    hoof care/vaccines/worming: 400
    Regumate: 500

    even if you keep your mare at home your own home, she eats $120 or thereabouts per month.

    some places charge the same of mare as mare with foal, some charge more. It's cheaper in europe, even with VAT.

    some vet clinics charge more for AI with frozen and some charge a flat fee per mare cycle instead of a la carte charges for palpaltions, exams.

    oh, I forgot dental...



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,467

    Default

    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,029

    Default

    The foal would be boarded for "free" until weaning. She is boarded right now so boarding her during pregnancy/foaling would be no "additional" cost. I am already paying that and will likely continue to pay board for her for the rest of her life, as well as the foal. My SO is not horsey at all so it would be a cold day in heck where I would ever be able to have a horse at home. The foal would be a keeper as long as possible (since I know things happen), so I am not at all looking to make money on this one.

    And just for fun, here is my mare:

    Skye

    She has had 6 foals previously, two of them WS qualified. Here are those two:

    Skye baby

    Skye baby

    And here are the two stallions I am considering:

    Spot My Blue Boy

    Choc Full Of Chips
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,029

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rodawn View Post
    Frankly, if you have to board, you are better off buying a weanie from a breeder
    Oh I am for sure considering this as well. As much as I would love to have a Skye-baby, I would be pretty devastated if I lost her too, which I am well aware can happen. There is just not a lot available in my breed of choice in the discipline I would be aiming the foal towards in my area in horses of any age.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2009
    Location
    Boerne, Texas
    Posts
    480

    Default

    This is something I try to explain to people frequently. We only have top bloodline mares with great conformation, movement, sound minds and dispositions. I only breed to top bloodline stallions with the same attributes, chosen carefully to complement each individual mare.

    My horses all receive top care from my highly specialized staff (all but 1 of my experienced staff have 4-year Equine Science degrees, with focus on breeding/reproduction) who along with me, work with our young horses from the day they are born to produce highly socialized, well behaved weanlings/young horses. We do not ever cut corners at all.

    All of this costs money, but the extra effort pays off in the long run, since our horses are well known for their excellent breeding, health, great dispositions and manageability. Why do many people still think it is unreasonable to price a top bred weanling foal at $15K when we already have close to that amount invested in it? Breeding is a business. We cannot afford to continue to breed if we lose money on every foal we produce by pricing them at far less than what we have invested in them.

    The initial price you pay for your young horse is, in most cases, actually small potatoes compared to what you will pay in ongoing expenses for board, training, vet bills, farrier, showing etc. It costs exactly the same for these expenses regardless of the breeding or overall quality of the horse.

    The difference comes in the horse's potential. If all you want is a horse to pleasure ride or occasionally take to a local schooling show, it is not so important, but if you are serious about competing, it just makes sense to get the best quality foal/young horse you can afford. That horse will likely have the most natural in born "tools in the toolbox" to become the best horse for allowing you to achieve your goals in the future. No amount of money/time spent on training can ever give your horse natural talent, great movement, conformation, a sound mind or a super disposition if he/she is not born with it.
    Tricia Veley-First Flight Farm
    Boerne, Texas
    830-537-4150 phone/830-537-4154 fax
    www.firstflightfarm.com
    FFF Page on Facebook: Become a fan!
    FFF Channel on YouTube: See videos


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Older Arabian - Very Hard Keeper - Typical of Breed?
    By pryme_thyme in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Nov. 6, 2012, 07:56 AM
  2. How much does your vet cost to breed with frozen?
    By faluut42 in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Aug. 30, 2010, 07:31 AM
  3. Cost to Breed a Mare
    By Mallrat7777 in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Feb. 6, 2009, 02:19 PM
  4. Replies: 39
    Last Post: Apr. 5, 2008, 05:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness