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  1. #141
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    Nov. 13, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice View Post
    Just a note:The OP stated that the Equine Now ads weren't hers, but they sure got deleted quickly! The ads are no longer available.
    How do you guys know the ads were the OPs in the first place??
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey


    4 members found this post helpful.

  2. #142
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    Jul. 20, 2010
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    Texarkana, AR
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    Don't you have a small pen like a round pen you can put her in? Put a halter and drag rope on her and you can have her halter broken and able to be handled in no time. She may never be a lovey dovey, meet you at the gate type horse but that's ok. It doesn't mean she's crazy or can't be worked.

    Bluey, we must be about the same age. I remember the VEE scare and the government vaccination program. We had a bunch of unhandled horses at the time. We ran them up the chute, vet jabbed them and then put a crimped piece of metal with a number on it in their mane. To the poster who said they don't use chutes for cattle on the east coast, well how do you handle them? Don't you have beef cattle on the east coast? Are all your cows pets?


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #143
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    Will the vet take her? Our vets sometimes will take ownership of an animal if they think it deserves more of a chance than it's getting and I think that could be applied here.

    OP I think you're still trying to avoid the writing on the wall, I think you need to pick a direction and go there.

    Certainly the round pen panels can be used to make a stall but you said she was a jumper so I didn't think that was the best idea b/c yes, they will jump out of them. Or shove their head under them. But only at first, stick her somewhere that she can start to settle down if you can, they're all nutty as a fruitcake when they're out on pasture. No matter what route you take you're going to need her in an enclosed area, being somewhat calm. So go do that 5 minutes ago while you figure out what to do next.

    I'd be having a more in-depth conversation with the vet maybe. Start gaining some traction here, you can't just keep letting this go on.

    You're making it easier on yourself instead of easier on her.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #144
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Just a note:The OP stated that the Equine Now ads weren't hers, but they sure got deleted quickly! The ads are no longer available.
    Yes, of course it was her. Feeble denials, then stomped off an ddeleted ads, came back with revised story.

    sad, really.


    14 members found this post helpful.

  5. #145
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
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    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    As a foal she had no issues. Half way through her yearling year she had one bout of what the vet felt was uveitis, lasted about 2 days one eye. Since then (18 months) she's had two other bouts. One with one eye, one with both eyes. Both times cleared up within a few days.

    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    Well this is the fourth bout of uveitis. First when she was 18 months, then two others. I will admit the first two I thought were simply ulcers. They cleared up so fast and she did have an uncle jimmy's hanging ball in her run in. So part of this is why this went "untreated". Until the 3rd the word uveitis was not used.
    I've just been skimming, I really don't like getting involved in trainwrecks, but....

    Huh??


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #146
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    the gravy thickens...

    but please OP take care of that filly no matter what goes on.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #147
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    Here feet are fine. She has great feet, small, perfect feet. She's not locked in a stall, they were fine. We have great soil and most of the horses the farrier just rasps off. So don't worry, no elf shoes on her.
    What about other routine maintenance? Has she been vaccinated? Have her teeth been addressed ever?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #148
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
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    293

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    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    Here feet are fine. She has great feet, small, perfect feet. She's not locked in a stall, they were fine. We have great soil and most of the horses the farrier just rasps off. So don't worry, no elf shoes on her.

    My neighbor has a back hoe and will bury for us in the field. Money is not an issue here, it's doing what is right and making sure that everyone is safe while doing it.

    And yes, I've had ulcers in the past that a horse has bumped or gotten something in the eye and they have cleared up quickly. So I'm afraid the first two episodes I did believe it was something in her eye as it was not a horrible looking spot.
    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    I will admit the first two I thought were simply ulcers. They cleared up so fast and she did have an uncle jimmy's hanging ball in her run in. So part of this is why this went "untreated".
    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    This filly was born and lived outside with her dam 24/7. Handled at birth, she was friendly, but not overly friendly. As she was weaned she got to the point she was uncatchable. Didn't trust humans. We had never had a foal like this before.

    About halfway into her yearling year she started to develop boughts of uveitis. The vet could not treat her as we just could not catch her and the barn we were at at the time had no safe stalls in which to contain her. We've moved since then. She'd done well all summer with just one small bought. I am at the point I can go up in the pasture and rub and pat her and she's ok with that. Most days. We feed her dewormer through her grain (she eats the paste on top) and her feet she has self trimmed nicely (think mustang).

    Sorry for quoting out of order (I think it's in reverse to date/time posted), but the multi-quote was not working properly (got a reply box with no copied text in it several times, but the multiquote box was still properly marked).

    I'm confused on a couple of points you've mentioned.

    So she's never had her feet trimmed or rasped at all? Or has the farrier been able to rasp her hooves?

    What do you usually do with a horse that you suspect has an eye injury or ulcer? Do you routinely do not treat ulcers? Just let them heal on their own? Or was this filly not treated because she was difficult to handle?

    You did say that money was not the issue, so I take it that vet bills are not the reason for not having a vet check eye injuries or suspected uveitis, or ulcers on your horse(s), as the case may be.

    My reading on your posts is that she has never had her feet done and never had any vet care either (vaccinations, etc.). If that is the case, to my mind, it's simply a matter of time before she gets a serious injury or illness that needs to be treated, or until the uveitis flares up again (especially without on-going handling and a flymask). So if the current flare-up IS resolving with the anti-inflammatories, do you now have the time to put into working with this horse to get her decently trained, or do you plan to get a trainer in to do so? I think that should factor into your plans for this filly, even if the current episode subsides.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  9. #149
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    FWIW, when I was first in practice, I had a breeder for a client who had multiple minimally handled younguns.

    When they got sick or injured, they got treated. They were civilized to the extent necessary to treat the problem, even if it wasn't as easy as having civilized them beforehand.

    We used to jokingly refer it it as the "X Farm Method of Breaking Horses".
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #150
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Here feet are fine. She has great feet, small, perfect feet. She's not locked in a stall, they were fine. We have great soil and most of the horses the farrier just rasps off. So don't worry, no elf shoes on her.
    Most ??of the horses have farrier care but so what- not her. Three yrs old and has never had her feet trimmed, no vax, no vet care for uveitiis, etc..

    Nothing changes that

    So if you have nice soil and your horse is turned out- no trims are ever necessary in 3 yrs. Good to know. Laughs hysterically.

    Keep talking. Some are buying it.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  11. #151
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2006
    Location
    Spruce Grove AB
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    Aside from all of the drama, which IMO is warranted somewhat, just please do what is right for your filly, starting now.

    If you can't absolutely, get her in a contained, safe area in which your vet can do the euth., find an experienced hunter or gunmen to do the deed. If a marksman can get close enough, (for absolute sure) go for a head shot.

    If the filly cannot stand still for an accurate shot, go for another kill zone which would be the heart, girth area. If the shot is accurate the filly should fall immediately and pass within a minute or so. Sounds horrible, and yes it is. (I have PTS, two beloved horses via vet euth, and it took each of them approx. Two minutes, one was quiet and the other, well, not so much )
    I am typing this as an experienced hunter. And for you, and anybody else who has to face this, it is really hard to take an animals life, be it for food or other.

    OP, it sounds to me that you are in over your head with this little filly and I do not envy your situation at all. I am sure you will be able to find an experienced hunter that can help you out and have compassion at the same time.

    Really and truly good luck for your filly and your self. This has been a learning experience for me, as I have never dealt or known a horse with UV or a 'just not right in the head horse'



  12. #152
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    Nov. 15, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    I've just been skimming, I really don't like getting involved in trainwrecks, but....

    Huh??
    Yes, looking back now the vet feels that it was the start of uveitis. Back then she did not feel it was when she came by the barn and looked at her. I'm sorry my wording was not clear. The first post was written when I was upset and frustrated.



  13. #153
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    Nov. 15, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curiously View Post
    So she's never had her feet trimmed or rasped at all? Or has the farrier been able to rasp her hooves?

    What do you usually do with a horse that you suspect has an eye injury or ulcer? Do you routinely do not treat ulcers? Just let them heal on their own? Or was this filly not treated because she was difficult to handle?

    You did say that money was not the issue, so I take it that vet bills are not the reason for not having a vet check eye injuries or suspected uveitis, or ulcers on your horse(s), as the case may be.

    My reading on your posts is that she has never had her feet done and never had any vet care either (vaccinations, etc.). If that is the case, to my mind, it's simply a matter of time before she gets a serious injury or illness that needs to be treated, or until the uveitis flares up again (especially without on-going handling and a flymask). So if the current flare-up IS resolving with the anti-inflammatories, do you now have the time to put into working with this horse to get her decently trained, or do you plan to get a trainer in to do so? I think that should factor into your plans for this filly, even if the current episode subsides.
    As a foal she was rasped/ trimmed. After she was weaned (she was weaned later as her mom was fat as a tick) was when she became more standoffish. My farrier would look at her and she seemed to wear her feet down with nice shape. Had she needed trimmed we would have done what was necessary, corner, lasso, etc. It's sad but it's the truth.

    Her dewormer have been on her grain for the last two years. She eats it happily and it's safe for everyone. She's had rabies and a 4 way, the minimum yearly since she was young. We don't routinely halter the horses for that and have been able to get her done with help. She has worn a halter before, but it not not halter broke. She does not mind me touching her head, but doesn't like my hands under her chin or on her chest.

    The flair up has subsided (we do have her in a shady run in area. My plan for this week is to get her separated and give her a chance, if anything I can separate, drug and get the halter on her, have the vet get a good look at her eyes. Decide what is best. The fact that she allows me to pet her in the field shows me she can trust somewhat. Just past that is her comfort zone. I'm still not sure pasture pet is her calling, and I don't know enough about uveitis to know if this is going to recur again or slow down. Any eye injury the vet is called immediately for. I don't just let them go. This filly makes it hard for the vet or I and the vet has put the limit on working with difficult animals. We just aren't in an area where there are vets that know how to handle ones like this and my vet is older with poor knees. So that is where I am right now. Respect me or hate me. I am trying.



  14. #154
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    As a foal she was rasped/ trimmed. After she was weaned (she was weaned later as her mom was fat as a tick) was when she became more standoffish. My farrier would look at her and she seemed to wear her feet down with nice shape. Had she needed trimmed we would have done what was necessary, corner, lasso, etc. It's sad but it's the truth.

    If she needed her feet trimmed, then you'd have roped her and trimmed her feet. But not for uveitis? For that you let it go each time without treatment (which you later change to banamine on feed)...so overgrown feet, rope and trim. Uveitis = ignore for 3 years and then ask the BB how to shoot her instead of treating it.

    Her dewormer have been on her grain for the last two years. She eats it happily and it's safe for everyone. She's had rabies and a 4 way, the minimum yearly since she was young. We don't routinely halter the horses for that and have been able to get her done with help. She has worn a halter before, but it not not halter broke. She does not mind me touching her head, but doesn't like my hands under her chin or on her chest.

    So you can stick her with needles, but not sedate her or chemically euthanize her. Amazing how that changed as soon as people questioned you on it.

    The flair up has subsided (we do have her in a shady run in area. My plan for this week is to get her separated and give her a chance, if anything I can separate, drug and get the halter on her, have the vet get a good look at her eyes. Decide what is best. The fact that she allows me to pet her in the field shows me she can trust somewhat. Just past that is her comfort zone. I'm still not sure pasture pet is her calling, and I don't know enough about uveitis to know if this is going to recur again or slow down. Any eye injury the vet is called immediately for. I don't just let them go. Well this is the fourth bout of uveitis. First when she was 18 months, then two others. I will admit the first two I thought were simply ulcers. They cleared up so fast and she did have an uncle jimmy's hanging ball in her run in. So part of this is why this went "untreated". This filly makes it hard for the vet or I and the vet has put the limit on working with difficult animals. We just aren't in an area where there are vets that know how to handle ones like this and my vet is older with poor knees.I have two vets that I use for equine. Have a good relationship with them. So that is where I am right now. Respect me or hate me. I am trying.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    8 members found this post helpful.

  15. #155
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice View Post
    Just a note:The OP stated that the Equine Now ads weren't hers, but they sure got deleted quickly! The ads are no longer available.
    my first thought was: whomever owns the ad didn't want the horse associated with this thread.. I don't blame them.

    I dont get why the OP is still posting so I m bowing out. have fun y'all.....


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #156
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    If you followed the ads back you got to a coth poster with a history of "vet too expensive" or "vet can't come out" posts.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #157
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    Care to bump one of those threads for the sleuth challenged?!


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #158
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    Her dewormer have been on her grain for the last two years. She eats it happily and it's safe for everyone. She's had rabies and a 4 way, the minimum yearly since she was young. We don't routinely halter the horses for that and have been able to get her done with help. She has worn a halter before, but it not not halter broke. She does not mind me touching her head, but doesn't like my hands under her chin or on her chest.
    You can't get a halter on her, or a rope around her neck, but you can get two needles into her yearly (or twice yearly, depending on where you are)?

    COUGH COUGH BULLSHIT COUGH COUGH.

    I have no idea why you're now telling us you're going to make an effort with this horse when the name of the game for her entire life is to ignore her and blame her issues on her being nutty. If she's so damned nutty that you've had no other choice but to do nothing with her, how on earth do you expect to do anything with her now?

    Or perhaps she's not real nutty at all? Perhaps she's just a neglected, untrained horse, and you're feeling guilty?


    14 members found this post helpful.

  19. #159
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Nevermind. I figured it out. OP, if you ever want to post here again you need to follow through on your threats to walk away from this thread. And take a hard look at your advertising practices. If those images are the best you can put out on the net, don't put anything out. In one pic the filly and her dam look as if they are up to their ankles in manure and it sure doesn't look like either of them ate their wormer out of their feed.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  20. #160
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    Nov. 15, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    [COLOR=#000080]If she needed her feet trimmed, then you'd have roped her and trimmed her feet. But not for uveitis? For that you let it go each time without treatment (which you later change to banamine on feed)...so overgrown feet, rope and trim. Uveitis = ignore for 3 years and then ask the BB how to shoot her instead of treating it.
    By untreated I meant ointment in her eye. I do not consider bute and banamine topically on feed treating a filly.

    Never once did I say the filly had not had routine deworming, shots care. That was something everyone else assumed. I'm sorry I didn't mention all of that in my first post. I didn't think that it was pertinent to the situation at hand.

    Filly's eyes look much better tonight.



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