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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    And somehow shooting her in a field at a distance doesn't actually strike me as humane euthanasia - where do you even find this marksman that is trained in killing horses "instantly" from 300 yards - cause if she's truly feral, that is about the distance that she would allow a strange human, nevermind one that stinks of strange things ...
    Have you read where I said that I can go up and pet her, scratch her, etc? when I bring the halter out and put it near her she freaks. But she trusts me as long as I don't have a halter in hand. I could give her grain and someone could walk up to her within 10 feet and shoot her. Euthanasia by gun shot is one method one of my two vets will use (when it's absolutely necessary). Gunshot is NOT a horrible way to go. Horrible for us, but she can be eating and then the next minute dead. So YES I AM thinking of the filly here. As opposed to having a stranger come and sedate her, lock her in a stall etc. I will admit. I've been negligent of the episodes that have never been this bad, but this filly HAS had a good life, other then that.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    If you put her in the barn, don't put her in by herself. Bring her in with her buddy from the pasture (will she follow another horse?) Do you have a quiet, older mare or gelding she could be turned out into a small paddock with?

    About shooting her: She seems to be out in a pasture with a group of other horses. They're fed either in tubs on the ground, or buckets on the fence? Now, she might let you come up and pat her, but a stranger, carrying a strange object -won't that spook all of them? Won't they all be running around? If she does come up and stick her head in the feed, she would have to be perfectly placed for him to shoot her through the heart. If he misses, or wounds her, everybody panics. She, or several of them go through a fence -or fences. What a mess! Who's going to bury her? Are you bringing someone in? If it takes several bullets through the body to finish her ,don't you think they 'll talk about it to everyone they see the rest of the day? This is a really bad idea.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Have you read where I said that I can go up and pet her, scratch her, etc? when I bring the halter out and put it near her she freaks. But she trusts me as long as I don't have a halter in hand. I could give her grain and someone could walk up to her within 10 feet and shoot her. Euthanasia by gun shot is one method one of my two vets will use (when it's absolutely necessary). Gunshot is NOT a horrible way to go. Horrible for us, but she can be eating and then the next minute dead. So YES I AM thinking of the filly here. As opposed to having a stranger come and sedate her, lock her in a stall etc. I will admit. I've been negligent of the episodes that have never been this bad, but this filly HAS had a good life, other then that.
    She is three yrs old and you can't put a halter on her? I don't get it.


    13 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by olddogs View Post
    If she does come up and stick her head in the feed, she would have to be perfectly placed for him to shoot her through the heart.
    The shot is to the head, not the heart.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
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  5. #45
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    Jan. 16, 2003
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    Have you considered getting some Ace from your vet, putting it in her feed, waiting for it to kick in, and then trying to get a halter on her? Maybe with enough Ace she won't freak out. If that works, then repeat before the vet comes out to euth her. If she leads and ties, have her tied to a sturdy object so she can't try to leave when the vet approaches her.
    It's 2014. Do you know where your old horse is?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
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    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    Have you read where I said that I can go up and pet her, scratch her, etc? when I bring the halter out and put it near her she freaks. But she trusts me as long as I don't have a halter in hand. I could give her grain and someone could walk up to her within 10 feet and shoot her. Euthanasia by gun shot is one method one of my two vets will use (when it's absolutely necessary). Gunshot is NOT a horrible way to go. Horrible for us, but she can be eating and then the next minute dead. So YES I AM thinking of the filly here. As opposed to having a stranger come and sedate her, lock her in a stall etc. I will admit. I've been negligent of the episodes that have never been this bad, but this filly HAS had a good life, other then that.
    Humanely euthing by gunshot isn't done at a 10 foot range. And if you can't get near her with a halter, I doubt a stranger with a rifle is going to be able to get close to her.
    I am appalled at someone who is a horseperson, a breeder, failing a horse so badly, that at 3 yrs, they aren't halter broke, and somewhat socialized enough to at least trim her, vaccinate her, worm her and provide vet care as needed. I don't care how difficult this filly was as a weanling. It's not impossible, and if you can't do it, you send them out to be trained. As a breeder, you owe it to the horses you breed to do at least that much, to help give them a possibility of a future. I can't believe you let her suffer through repeated uveitis outbreaks with no vet care.
    I'm ok euthing a dangerous horse, but this one is entirely on you.

    And people can say that's mean, but I get the impression the OP came here looking for people to say "there, there...it's ok to euth. She has no quality of life". She HASN"T because of the OP's actions. Hopefully the OP is no longer breeding. Even most BYB's will at least halter break their horses. If the OP realizes that, and her lack of responsibility slaps her up against the head, then that's at least something positive.


    25 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
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    Dec. 11, 2002
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    First of all, I am sorry. Because the situation stinks like rotten fish.
    I believe a good part of the situation. Is of your own making, which you have acknowledged.

    I will not judge you, because I simply can not know what other factors contribute to this sad situation.

    My own young mare lost an eye while I was laid up with a broken leg. She was being cared for by very competent people when it happened. But, as her MOM, I can't help but beat myself up for thinking "if only I had been able to care for her, maybe....."

    Living out in a herd is not a bad thing. And while everyone, including you agrees that you dropped the ball with this horse, no one but you knows why. I personally love my horses like they are my kids, but sometimes other things must take priority over doing more than making sure basic needs are met. Our own illnesses, injuries, those of close family members, upheaval at home or work can mean we can't do all the things we should.

    What is done can not be undone. And even if you had tons of time to try and remedy the issue of her being rather feral, the fact is, she has a condition that is painful and recurring. It's not something that goes away, even with the best treatment and Prophylactic measures.

    I do not condemn you for deciding to put her down. However, I see having her shot, at distance, an unreasonable and foolish option. There is no immediate need to eliminate her. So you should, IMO, take some time to get her to the point that you can halter her and hold her for euthanasia.

    Please, please get some banamine in her. Uveitis is horribly painful. Banamine is nasty tasting, so you may have to use some tranq as well. Please ask your vet what is best.

    I'm sorry. For her and for you. You dont sound like an awful person. We all make errors. The past is gone. Do your best now.
    I\'m not crazy. I\'m just a little unwell.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by halteralter98 View Post
    Have you read where I said that I can go up and pet her, scratch her, etc? when I bring the halter out and put it near her she freaks. But she trusts me as long as I don't have a halter in hand. I could give her grain and someone could walk up to her within 10 feet and shoot her. Euthanasia by gun shot is one method one of my two vets will use (when it's absolutely necessary). Gunshot is NOT a horrible way to go. Horrible for us, but she can be eating and then the next minute dead. So YES I AM thinking of the filly here. As opposed to having a stranger come and sedate her, lock her in a stall etc. I will admit. I've been negligent of the episodes that have never been this bad, but this filly HAS had a good life, other then that.
    You painted this horse "feral" not me (based upon your description, I don't think she's the least bit feral).

    I agree that euthanasia by gunshot can be just as humane as any other method - the part I don't understand is your plan to involve someone other than your vet - who will use gun shot.

    You seem to be full of inconsistencies - a stranger sedating her will be too stressful, who then will be shooting her?
    It's OK for her to suffer bouts of uveitis throughout her life, but it's unacceptabe stress to sedate or stall or work with this horse...

    I read the title of your topic,
    What would you do?
    & did answer that.

    I don't understand your choices but I don't see that I have villified you in anyway.
    I do feel sad for this filly.

    Please take some time to read
    Jingles please for our "Maestro"


    9 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
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    Oct. 12, 2005
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    Va
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    I think the "some horses are born different" is a bit of a BS line here, if you have a weanling filly that's hard to handle then you run it into a stall and handle it. I've dealt with horses that have minimal handling and after a few weeks of being stalled at night and handled several times a day they come around. It's not that difficult. I mean, nobody even trims this filly's feet.
    Sorry, but some horses ARE born different. Several years (20+) ago I worked for a breeder and she had a half crazy mare that gave birth to a totally crazy filly. This filly was handled from the time she was born. Daily. Kindly. Firmly. She was just mean as a snake. She was sold as a racing prospect as a 2 year old and the buyer was warned not to trust her, she was mean as a snake. Old Timey trainer that was pretty sure he knew everything. Within 6 months she nailed him in the stall and guarded him and wouldn't let anyone in to help. Think they finally used a pitchfork to get her in the corner so they could get him out. He was in the hospital for a looonnggg time. Nothing physically wrong with this mare, just born mean. So, yeah, sometimes they're just born different.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Humanely euthing by gunshot isn't done at a 10 foot range. And if you can't get near her with a halter, I doubt a stranger with a rifle is going to be able to get close to her.
    I am appalled at someone who is a horseperson, a breeder, failing a horse so badly, that at 3 yrs, they aren't halter broke, and somewhat socialized enough to at least trim her, vaccinate her, worm her and provide vet care as needed. I don't care how difficult this filly was as a weanling. It's not impossible, and if you can't do it, you send them out to be trained. As a breeder, you owe it to the horses you breed to do at least that much, to help give them a possibility of a future. I can't believe you let her suffer through repeated uveitis outbreaks with no vet care.
    I'm ok euthing a dangerous horse, but this one is entirely on you.

    And people can say that's mean, but I get the impression the OP came here looking for people to say "there, there...it's ok to euth. She has no quality of life". She HASN"T because of the OP's actions. Hopefully the OP is no longer breeding. Even most BYB's will at least halter break their horses. If the OP realizes that, and her lack of responsibility slaps her up against the head, then that's at least something positive
    Tough words but true .

    Really if anyone else came here and posted that I have a yrling with uveitis but she lives in a herd and I can't catch her,so we will just let it go and aren't going to do any vet care, hoof care, vaccines and so on for a few yrs - what would the responses be? AOK, poor OP? The OP bred and raised this horse that at age three still cannot be haltered? Something is rotten in Denmark.


    13 members found this post helpful.

  11. #51
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    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by minnie View Post
    Sorry, but some horses ARE born different. Several years (20+) ago I worked for a breeder and she had a half crazy mare that gave birth to a totally crazy filly. This filly was handled from the time she was born. Daily. Kindly. Firmly. She was just mean as a snake. She was sold as a racing prospect as a 2 year old and the buyer was warned not to trust her, she was mean as a snake. Old Timey trainer that was pretty sure he knew everything. Within 6 months she nailed him in the stall and guarded him and wouldn't let anyone in to help. Think they finally used a pitchfork to get her in the corner so they could get him out. He was in the hospital for a looonnggg time. Nothing physically wrong with this mare, just born mean. So, yeah, sometimes they're just born different.
    And I bet that even THAT filly was able to be haltered, trimmed, and had vet care...


    6 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
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    May. 13, 2012
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    You failed the filly. You completely utterly made it hopeless that she would find a home.

    You should euthanize her. As she is blind, I don't see how she can "see" a halter. Bring out some grain with some Ace, put on her halter, and let the vet come out and euthanize her with you calming the filly.

    As you've destroyed her quality of life, you owe it to her to at least be strong enough to calm her as she dies. Smother her in treats before the vet euthanizes her, and talk to her as the drugs set in.

    It isn't pleasant, but it's pleasanter than her current situation.

    I feel for the filly. I feel bad you're in this situation thanks to bad decisions you previously made.


    23 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Apr. 9, 2012
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    Yes, this should have been handled differently years ago and should not have gotten to this point.

    So, do the euth humanely and safely for the filly, for you, and for your other horses. To me that means Ace in the feed, halter, and then euth. No guns, no risk of a slow, painful death or terrified horses running around the property.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!


    11 members found this post helpful.

  14. #54
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    Mar. 8, 2009
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    What a weird story.

    Sounds like one of those Craigslist cases...

    OP, really in 3 years, you've never been able to put a halter on this horse?
    This is ridiculous. And self-trimming like a mustang for 3 years?!? Your horse is no mustang, 'cause even them can be trained to put an halter on.

    It took me close to 1 years of daily training to be able to load my mare on a trailer. She had been traumatized younger. She would strike, rear and flip (she almost broke her tail), kick out, bite and charge... Well, I can now lead her happily in any trailer I want without resistance. And you know why I did this? Because I wanted to make sure that if something happen (fire/storm/colic emergency) I could quickly load her and if ever she's for sale, people won't feel the need to beat her up to get on a trailer.

    I'm sorry but, shame on you OP! You should have seeked professional help and/or get rid of this horse long ago (like 3 yrs ago) There is plenty of techniques available to train horses. People train zebras for Pete's sake!!!

    ETA:
    You own a boarding facility and give lessons.!?
    And you wonder why your last boarder left with a text message...


    12 members found this post helpful.

  15. #55
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    May. 4, 2003
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    The OP was right to come on here under an alter. Shame on everybody for piling onto her with what she sees as a huge problem and needing advice.
    We don't know all the back-story and there are quite likely a lot of assumptions by people here. Walk a mile in somebody's shoes before judging.
    I'm sorry OP for your situation - but something has to be done soon with her condition. Shooting from a distance is not an option imo, but try bringing her in with a buddy and tranquing her and keeping her in until she settles. Has she never been in? How did you transport her? Do you have a vet?
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #56
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    Nov. 15, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    Has she never been in? How did you transport her? Do you have a vet?
    She's been in a barnyard (Large enclosed stall with baby friends). We no longer are renting that barn. When we moved she followed all her friends onto the trailer. We transported the young stock loose in a large stock trailer. I have two vets that I use for equine. Have a good relationship with them.
    I'm thinking this over. We built a stall that has a full door today for her. I'm not sure however keeping her separate from her friends is the best option right now. Paddock is not an option. Putting her in a strange place she will just freak. At our old barn she was a fence jumper for fun. She's jumped four foot fences fro the sheer joy of being able to do it. There was one other foal in her crop that did the same thing. She was born later and learned from him.
    This filly is a rare case. I've raised over 50 foals. Every one of them I've been able to halter, lead, load on a trailer, stood for farrier, stood for vet. This filly is different. I can pet and touch her. She will not let me halter her. I've taken a truly feral horse off a 150 acre pasture and got him to trust me and trained him. This filly does not hate me, she does not trust me. I know I failed the filly and I have tough skin. I also realize that most of the people that are posting negative things most likely have not walked in my shoes, nor had a filly like this. So all the comments are fair enough.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
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    There are horse ranches all over the west where horses are still livestock where this is not that unusual of a situation. The unusual part of the situation is that she hasn't already been put down for either the eyes or the loose screw.

    There are literally thousands of colts that get halter broke then turned out for years. Valuable colts-lots of them go through Billings Livestock for good money. See them All. The. Time.

    And we have actually put our own horses down by ourselves in the pasture. That used to be about the ONLY way people put down a horse, not too long ago actually.

    OP only you know if you can plunk down a 50 lb bag of sweet feed and if she would stand there eating calmly enough for someone to get a clean shot. for heavens sake make sure it's someone that knows how to do it on a horse-call the vet and explain the situation. Our vet carries a gun as well as a needle.

    Your biggest mistake was asking a "horses are livestock" question to a large group that is "horses are pets" people. It's hard to explain or fathom if you're firmly in one camp or another. This is the wrong group to ask this question; it's just not where most of the members of this board are going to be much help to you.

    I'm not Agatha Christie enough to try to figure out your whole life story, taking this post at face value.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    Your biggest mistake was asking a "horses are livestock" question to a large group that is "horses are pets" people.
    Her biggest mistake was not dispatching this unfortunate filly when her eye problems manifested and OP decided she couldn't/wouldn't put in the effort to get her halter broke enough for treatment, as I assume a "horses are livestock" person would've. Instead of bellyaching and waffling about it on a forum.


    14 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
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    well yeah, letting it go on too long isn't anything done right. Not so sure about halter breaking as a necessary part of the treatment though it certainly makes it easier. I've known a horse that was 17 years old and had never had a halter on her head. The owner ran her through the squeeze chute approach to worm her and do whatever vet work had to be done. That mare was out on 1200 acres and had perfect feet, never trimmed. She could be petted and grained out in pasture and put in a corral but never was haltered. Managed her like a cow, not a horse.

    OP needs to resolve the situation for sure but I still think she's asking the wrong crowd at this point.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    well yeah, letting it go on too long isn't anything done right. Not so sure about halter breaking as a necessary part of the treatment though it certainly makes it easier. I've known a horse that was 17 years old and had never had a halter on her head. The owner ran her through the squeeze chute approach to worm her and do whatever vet work had to be done. That mare was out on 1200 acres and had perfect feet, never trimmed. She could be petted and grained out in pasture and put in a corral but never was haltered. Managed her like a cow, not a horse.

    OP needs to resolve the situation for sure but I still think she's asking the wrong crowd at this point.
    Sure, but if you want to treat horses as livestock, then you've got to have the equipment--the fencing and the alleys and the squeeze chutes--to treat them when they need treated. Just like how you've either got to make sure your cattle are pets and handleable for the required care, or have the equipment to handle them (or have a friend/vet/someone you pay with the require portable equipment.)

    Having a critter--ANY critter--that you are unable to provide veterinary care for is a problem, whether the reason is training or facilities or available dollars.

    If this filly was just nutty and had a screw loose allowing her to be feral without ANY ability to truly handle her for three years is a miss. If she went nutty after she was weaned, then it was the OPs responsibility to either a) make it a priority to put the time/money/whatever into her to train her to be handled, b) have the facilities to work with her in a safe manner, even though the horse wasn't willing or c) drop her in the field somehow and call her a loss.

    Shit happens. We all know that. But WE are responsible for that. Letting this filly get to three and go BLIND from uveitis is terribly unfair to her. And I would say the same were it a cow, a camel or a horse.


    9 members found this post helpful.

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