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  1. #1
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    Default Ulceric arthritic dog-alternate delivery methods for NSAIDS?

    I have a client whose 10 y o Lab was diagnosed with ulcers Monday after showing extreme discomfort. No US was done-diagnosis based on perfect bloodwork, physical symptoms, and carprofen usage daily for arthritis for about a year. Dog is quite arthritic and has very poor hind end conformation and was becoming very uncomfortable before NSAID RX.

    Poor Smudge is on sucralate and is responding well-no more abdominal pain symptoms- but the NSAIDs have worn off, and he is back to sitting a lot and having trouble with stairs, etc.

    Owner will be talking to her vet Monday, and I have given her info found here on Adequan (thanks, dear CoTHers!), but I was curious about alternate delivery methods for NSAIDs, eliminating the threat of ulcers? I know there are alternate delivery systems for Kitty meds -thank God and I was hoping there were some of the same for the pups?

    I also suggested acupuncture...is there anything else?

    Thanks in advance.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  2. #2
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    Misoprostal. Its a really good GI protectant. Was able to give my Rottie oral NSAIDS because of it. With out it, she would barf blood, and shoot blood out of her bum.

    Also Rimadyl is injectable. But look into the misoprostal. WAYYY better than carafate. Not expensive FWIR.

    I also did adequan (IM) and Legend (IV) on her at home, and gave tramadol.



  3. #3
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    Tramadol is an opiod and doesn't affect stomachs as much as NSAIDs ulcer-wise (but can make them vomit). My older dog got Fentanyl patches in the end stages of his arthritis/hip dysplasia saga.



  4. #4
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    Excellent! Thank you, Judysmom Will pass this on.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  5. #5
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    Sorry to hijack the thread, but are ulcers common for dogs on regular rimadyl? My vet just prescribed continuous use of rimadyl for my 13 yr. old JRT, as she's starting to feel stiff and creaky in the colder weather. I worry about her staying healthy for the long term (hey, she could live another 5 years!) with NSAIDs meds. Thoughts?



  6. #6
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    If a drug causes ulcers when given orally, it will cause ulcers via other delivery methods as well. It's not the drug IN the stomach that's the problem, it's the pathways that it affects in the inflammatory cascade and how the stomach lining is produced.

    So taking the same drug and turning it into a transdermal prep (for example) will not change things for you. You either need to protect the stomach with another drug, or change drugs, period.

    I wonder if you could use surpass in canines? I love it in equines, and for myself! Works beautifully, as long as you can target a joint or two. Wouldn't work if the dog is sore all over.


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  7. #7
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    All NSAIDs can cause ulcers, liver and kidney problems. Its best to do a senior blood panel before starting NSAIDs, and my vet wanted to recheck bloodwork in a few months, and stop the meds immediately if you see vomiting, diarrhea, excessive drinking, or anorexia.

    But I've had a number of dogs on different NSAIDs, and have never had any problems with ulcers or liver damage-and they certainly do really give a HUGE quality of life boost to the golden oldies.

    With my last old girl, I took to giving her Pepcid one hour before her meals which contained Rimadyl. She had always had a sensitive stomach, and my vet said it wouldn't hurt and could prevent ulcers. The dog I posted about wasn't on Pepcid. Maybe you can ask your vet.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  8. #8
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    Aha! Thanks, Simkie.




    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    If a drug causes ulcers when given orally, it will cause ulcers via other delivery methods as well. It's not the drug IN the stomach that's the problem, it's the pathways that it affects in the inflammatory cascade and how the stomach lining is produced.

    So taking the same drug and turning it into a transdermal prep (for example) will not change things for you. You either need to protect the stomach with another drug, or change drugs, period.

    I wonder if you could use surpass in canines? I love it in equines, and for myself! Works beautifully, as long as you can target a joint or two. Wouldn't work if the dog is sore all over.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  9. #9
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    have they tried Adequan injections? or cetyl-M supplements? many dogs respond dramatically to either/or sufficiently that they can go off their NSAIDs.
    Or if the dog has really severe hip problems, the only real cure may be surgery.



  10. #10
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    Wendy, no, they haven't tried Adequan or any other injections, but are now aware of them. The dog's conformation (roached back, sickle hocks, hind end angles) is unfortunate, but he seems less dysplastic than overall arthritic IMO...I don't think they've done any hip rads in his 10 yrs., and he doesn't have a noticeably bad leg. I convinced them to switch from Iams to a grain-free food, and to give gluc-chond supps, and they are good at keeping their dogs lean. They had been giving fish oil caps, but stopped for some reason a while ago. I've urged them to resume.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  11. #11
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    Dec. 30, 2002
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    What about previcox? It's an NSAID, but I believe it's easier on stomachs than others.



  12. #12
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    If you dog has had ulcers on NSAIDs, I would do everything possible to keep that dog off of them.

    Cosequin DS in conjunction with Tramadol, Adequan (or Polyglycan and/or Cartrophen ) is what our orthopedic surgeons recommend to those owners whose pets cant tolerate NSAIDs.

    If the pain is severe, denervation is an option if THR/FHO surgeries are not.

    Physiotherapy (by someone certified) can help significantly, and some dogs also respond well to accupuncture.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    I wonder if you could use surpass in canines? I love it in equines, and for myself! Works beautifully, as long as you can target a joint or two. Wouldn't work if the dog is sore all over.
    Unfortunately while diclofinac works well for people and horses it is not used in dogs. The risk of side effects vs. benefits is too high considering the other available options.

    I would look into a herbal product called "Body Sore". It got my old rthritic dog off NSAIDS, without having the negative side effects.

    There are also options like cold lasering, acupuncture and rehab to help as well
    You can't fix stupid.... but you can breed it!



  14. #14
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    My two cents.

    Cosequin DS has been a huge help for my old doberman. Takes awhile to kick in. Also, my MIL lab with hip displasia has been treated for ulcers (just from food, not NSAIDS) and also had great success with Cosequin. They treated her ulcers with omeprezol (sp?) I think.

    Tramadol is wonderful, but there is a risk of siezures to be aware of. Also you don't just go on it and then cut it cold, as it is habit forming (as stated, it is an opiate). My 71 lb dog was not sleepy or weird on it all until we were up to 150mg 4x a day, which is a big dose. It is relatively cheap. I believe you need a perscription.

    What does the vet say, or are you the vet??

    I would not do NSAIDs with this dog if it is ulcer prone.
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  15. #15
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    I'm not the dog's owner; I exercise him for his owners 5x/week and board him a lot. Last Monday was the first observation of ulcerlike symptoms, which subsided within a few hours of sucralate treatment, and he has been symptom-free ever since. He has been NSAID-free since last Monday AM and while stiffer, isn't in terrible shape at this time, which I'm happy to see. They do have him on fish oil-it just wasn't given to me to feed the last few boarding times- and he is on a senior-strength joint supplement, though I suspect it comes from Petco. Not that Petco doesnt have a good product, its just not Cosequin.

    Still waiting to hear the outcome of the client's talk with the vet re:Adequan and/or other alternatives to NSAIDs for this guy. I volunteered to do the injections if they decide on that route, and I hope they do.

    I really appreciate the help, guys
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  16. #16
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    Question: Have they tried one of the long-acting NSAIDs?

    My (not quite 6) older BC has an arthritic wrist (trauma injury) and has caused her some other issues as well. My vet put her on to Trioxcil (sp?) last night - the loading dose is 1 pill last night, 1 pill in exactly 2 weeks time, and then 1 pill monthly there-after. Other than requiring a big meal immediately after the pill (which is quite small) to slow down absorption, I was advised that it would be a very quick improvement. It is also supposed to have minimal side-effects particularly around the GI tract.

    I was "ho hum" about the speed of recovery - but WOW this morning on our (short walk) no lameness, no crabbing and no holding up her arthritic paw. Yes, she is a BC but she is back to MY BC
    Still Working_on_it - one day I will get it!



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