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  1. #21
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    Jun. 13, 2001
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    Why have one at all? If they are short enough to prevent the horse coming up in the rider's face they are too short to allow a proper bascule. And why on the flat at all?
    I.D.E.A. yoda


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  2. #22
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    New York, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
    Why would you need one? Why would you put a staning martingale on a horse for a "look"???
    Because hunters are judged on looks?


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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2012
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    PA
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    407

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    I own a standing martingale. It has been collecting dust in the tack room for years.

    I never quite understood the trend of putting them on all hunters for the over fences classes. If hunters are supposed to be have the appearance of a horse that is smooth and effortless to ride and jump, why would you want to show it wearing a training aid used for horses that throw their heads or raise them above the point of being controllable?

    When I was in Pony Club, the ONLY time they could be used by anyone over the D3 rating was for Polocrosse. Running martingales, on the other hand, could be used by all levels.


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  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2010
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    recent transplant to the Peper
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    548

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    I use my standing for certain jump schools and when showing over fences. It is kept loose so that she only hits it when it is really needed. I started her out with it on the lunge line to see how she would react (she can be a bit of a hot TB mare). When she as fine with that, I did various exercises with her in it before jumping. Just flatwork the first day, followed by rails on the ground the second and then jumping her (she was schooling 2'6 at the time and still very green). It has been kept loose purposely so she doesn't learn to lean on it. It can be a very useful tool if adjusted and maintained properly. I see WAY too many horses with martingales that are too tight and used on incorrectly adjusted noseband.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
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    480

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    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    I'd use it a bit before jump schooling, a few rides anyway. It should not bother them or need much introduction if you adjust it properly and the horse is well broke to the bridle on the flat. It's only ever going to come into play if they evade and really get out of position above the bit. It's really just sort of a backstop, not something they will even notice if they are going properly.
    I second this. I have NEVER had a horse that needed a standing until my most recent OTTB. He is fine until he's not. He'll be going along nice and quiet and in the bridle and then out of nowhere he throws a tantrum and starts leaping in the air and cavorting and flinging his head. It was during one of these episodes when I was struck in the chest by a flinging greenie head and decided it was time for this device. Until he's more trained and more reliable, I'll be using one (adjusted quite loosely I might add).

    To the OP: If your horse doesn't need one, don't use one, simple as that. If you must use one, I would recommend introducing it by letting your horse hit it while you are not riding them. I have known horses to panic slightly the first couple of times they hit it so I would say to adjust it very loosely and lunge them in it first, creating a scenario where they do hit it. Once you know how they're going to respond, you can begin riding them with it accordingly.
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi


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  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2011
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    Ontario
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    908

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    Quote Originally Posted by fourmares View Post
    Never. Unless they need one for some reason.
    This. I completely agree with this statement. If they are not throwing their head in my face or bucking/rearing (grab strap), I don't use it.
    It is just one more thing I need to put on my horse and clean.

    It might be a trend right now but it won't affect placings as long as your horse puts in a solid round.


    Plus, I want my horse to be able to stretch down and round his jump and in case he/she needs to bail me out of a bad spot I don't want to impede his movement with a trendy strap.


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  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2011
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    Southern Pines, NC
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    Personally, even if I didn't plan on using one on the horse ever, I'd introduce it but have the part that attaches to the bridle knotted around the neck strap. I think it's a good idea to get a young one used to having something around their neck/on their chest in case sometime down the road they need a breast collar or their rider would like to use a neckstrap. If you feel as though one might be useful on the horse, like in a situation like besttwtbever's, then just keep it loose enough to have no effect whatsoever until Dobbin does his damnedest to break your nose while having a baby moment.

    As far as the "fashion" thing goes, this is how I feel about it. Anything we put on a horse should serve a purpose, and we should know the purpose of whatever we're putting on the horse. If the purpose behind your use of a standing martingale is looks, then go for it, as long as you can adjust it correctly. But if you're just throwing one on for no purpose you can think of, then maybe it's best to leave it in the tack room.
    I've heard there's more to life than an FEI tent and hotel rooms, so I'm trying it.


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  8. #28
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    Dec. 25, 2007
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    1,435

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    Another standing thread.

    And just like all of the others, full of misinformation.

    First, properly adjusted a horse can not lean on one.

    Second, properly adjusted it can not interfere with his bascule.

    Third, properly adjusted it can not interfere with a horse's recovery from a stumble, step in a hole, etc.

    But the key is to adjust properly.

    Although written many years ago, the book by William P. Wadsworth, MFH."Riding to Hounds in America: An Introduction for Foxhunters", is still considered the foxhunter's bible for appointments and manners in the field.

    A standing martingale is considered an essential part of the correct turn out.


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  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2005
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    Where it is perpetually winter
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    Quote Originally Posted by pryme_thyme View Post
    Plus, I want my horse to be able to stretch down and round his jump and in case he/she needs to bail me out of a bad spot I don't want to impede his movement with a trendy strap.
    Not picking on you specifically, but I wanted to borrow the last part of your quote.

    This picture is of a hunter I showed once. He is in a properly adjusted standing martingale, is bailing me out of a bad spot in that picture, and I'd say he's jumping pretty round.

    In general, if you don't like a standing, don't use one. But there are a lot of people who clearly don't understand how it works when it's properly adjusted.


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  10. #30
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    Apr. 2, 2011
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    Westchester, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by cssutton View Post
    Second, properly adjusted it can not interfere with his bascule.
    This. Most top hunters go in standing martingales. Why would they spend $100k+ on a top hunter, only to impede its jump with a piece of equipment?

    I'm not saying if the top riders do it then it must be okay, I'm just saying it would make no sense to put a hunter in something that impedes roundness since hunters are chosen for that very trait.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Jan. 21, 2000
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    I've been hit in the face before <1" from my eye. I use a standing martingale unless the horse has proven itself otherwise.
    For going to an unknown environment (fox hunting etc), yes, I use a standing martingale. I don't want to be hit in the face again and I don't want plastic surgery on my face.



  12. #32
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    Dec. 25, 2007
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    What really gets me is that most people don't get the fact that a straight line is shorter than a curved line.

    Maybe all horse people flunked geometry.

    A properly adjusted standing, when the horse raises his head to an unsatisfactory or dangerous elevation, has to go from the girth around a pretty large curve to go around his chest and from there up to the nose band.

    Now when he has his head in the correct position, the standing is in a more nearly straight line from the girth to the nose band. It will have quite a bit of slack.

    That is why all standings MUST have a rubber stop unless the standing is an attachment to a breast plate.

    As the head is lowered in relation to the withers, the line becomes straighter.

    From that point down to the nose on the ground, as in a near fall from a stumble, hole or broken rail, the line becomes even straighter and the standing becomes more loose.

    It becomes loose to the point that the horse can stick his nose out in front of him as far as required so as to get that stretch he might need to get back on his feet.

    By the way, I do not present myself as a show rider. On other threads, I have mentioned that the last time I rode in a show was sometime around 1957.

    However, I started riding in the days when our field hunters showed in the local shows and we jumped anything and everything in sight.

    I have a photo of my field hunter of that day jumping a triple bar with a 12' spread, 4' high.

    With a standing martingale.

    I jumped a 5' fence with the same horse. Just once, just to see if he would do it.

    He did, so I was happy and never asked him to do it again.

    In those days, we did stuff like that just for fun.

    For instance there is a photo somewhere of Junebug Tate jumping a car hood.

    The point is that I am not a show rider, but I have done some fun things.
    Last edited by cssutton; Dec. 4, 2012 at 09:55 PM. Reason: To say that Junebug is Lloyd Tate of Blowing Rock fame.


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  13. #33
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    Dec. 25, 2007
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    and also to make the point that it is not correct that horses are handicapped by a standing when jumping big fences.


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  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2004
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    Western WA
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    857

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
    Why would you need one? Why would you put a staning martingale on a horse for a "look"???
    Seriously?!? This is the Hunters. Everything in the showring is about 'a look' be it hunters or jumpers. Why do the hunters all go in Dee Ring bits now, instead of full cheek. Generally, with a few exceptions, it's style.

    This is neither good nor bad - it just is. Remember that the operative word in Horse Show is 'SHOW. Kind of like, why do we braid for the show ring? Because it looks nice. No other reason.


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  15. #35
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    Jun. 7, 2006
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    I used to put one on every horse just in case we had the one freak moment where their head would come up suddenly or whatever. Sort of like you wear a helmet every ride just in case so may as well put the standing on just in case the 3% good it would do you might help out in a pinch one day.

    I have since decided it it too much of a drag to put on and clean, and the 3% of good it MIGHT do me one day isn't worth all that, so I don't bother anymore. My horse shows without one; he has a very pretty head and looks very elegant without anything todistract of lead the eye away.

    If an owner were to tell me, "But MY horses show in a standing," I would put one on for show day, adjust it properly, and expect it to never come into play anyway.



  16. #36
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    Jan. 18, 2004
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    Western WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    I used to put one on every horse just in case we had the one freak moment where their head would come up suddenly or whatever. Sort of like you wear a helmet every ride just in case so may as well put the standing on just in case the 3% good it would do you might help out in a pinch one day.

    I have since decided it it too much of a drag to put on and clean, and the 3% of good it MIGHT do me one day isn't worth all that, so I don't bother anymore. My horse shows without one; he has a very pretty head and looks very elegant without anything todistract of lead the eye away.

    If an owner were to tell me, "But MY horses show in a standing," I would put one on for show day, adjust it properly, and expect it to never come into play anyway.
    THIS!



  17. #37
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    Oct. 21, 2009
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    I only use it as needed so there isn't really an exact time when I put it on the youngsters. Regardless, I have never had a horse panic when first wearing one (most likely because they have always been properly adjusted) so I haven't ever really worried about introducing it to them with any special method. The main times I like to use them is when first starting over fences or first showing. Basically the times when they are more likely to be goofballs. By that time they have fairly educated mouths and have no issues with that kind of pressure on the nose.

    I would say of the 7 personal horses that I am showing this next year, maybe one or two will go in a martingale. If I had a client who insisted that their horse should wear a martingale, I would have no problem with that. Also, with ammy and jr riders, I am more likely to put one on *just in case*. They have a much slower reaction time and would be more likely to get caught off guard with a playful horse.



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