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  1. #161
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    His feet are looking much better after 3 trims. He has no more foot sensitivity. But there is still stiffness. I know this picture is graphic but can you tell me if this scar tissue from the gelding procedure looks normal? It is super sensitive (ie he tries to kick me) but it feels hard and no other gelding I've looked at has this.

    This scar is 6 months old. I know earlier in the thread people asked about this and I'm wondering if this is the other part of his problem

    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...ps9f3298d5.jpg



  2. #162
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    Idk about the scarring but I missed the feed posting. If he won't eat the beet pulp like my guys wheat bran is great. My guys love it and the one with. Hoof problems right now is finally dropping some weight, which was very needed. I do give vitamins with it though.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  3. #163
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2013
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    Hi,

    I am having a similar problem with my gelding so I am just wondering if his feet were the fix?



  4. #164
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    Well I think his feet were 90% of the problem. He has been barefoot for 6 months and being trimmed by a barefoot trimmer every 4 weeks. His feet look so much better and more natural. He also had a couple abscesses break through over the last few months. The trimmer thinks it was due to all the inflammation. So now the horse will trot. In fact, now he trots better than he lopes, lol. He is still very lazy. Maybe that's completely unrelated! It takes a year for a full hoof to grow out so I'm still expecting more improvement. But he trots now and the only thing I changed were his feet. He is much more comfortable and doesn't stumble anymore. I have him on low starch feed and a hoof supplement. Does your gelding have shoes on?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #165
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2013
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    3

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    Hi
    I have only had my guy for 5 weeks and he could trot when I got him but as of yesterday he won't trot at all. He had shoes on him when I got him, he pulled one a few days later and I got the other one pulled shortly after and it was not long after that I started noticing the head bobs and such at a trot. I am wondering about abcesses bc the nail holes were pretty big so I was just wanting to know what happened with your horse! I am happy to hear that he has improved!



  6. #166
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    Yeah I bet it is the feet! If he was in shoes for a long time it'll take time and maybe a few abscesses to get used to being barefoot. Good luck!



  7. #167
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    Jun. 3, 2013
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    Thanks! I am going to contact my farrier who works on the vet college horses first off and see what he says.



  8. #168
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    Well I think his feet were 90% of the problem. He has been barefoot for 6 months and being trimmed by a barefoot trimmer every 4 weeks. His feet look so much better and more natural. He also had a couple abscesses break through over the last few months. The trimmer thinks it was due to all the inflammation. So now the horse will trot. In fact, now he trots better than he lopes, lol. He is still very lazy. Maybe that's completely unrelated! It takes a year for a full hoof to grow out so I'm still expecting more improvement. But he trots now and the only thing I changed were his feet. He is much more comfortable and doesn't stumble anymore. I have him on low starch feed and a hoof supplement. Does your gelding have shoes on?
    Great update
    I'd love to see video if you're up for it

    Give him another 6 months of feeling good before you judge him on the laziness - at this time, he'll still have a lot more memory of pain/discomfort even though he's beginning to feel better.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #169
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
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    2,527

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    Wonderful News!



  10. #170
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Stoystown, PA
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    Great to hear he's feeling better

    I've heard they can abscess when the foot starts to function as it should, no personal experience with that though.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  11. #171
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    Sep. 29, 2009
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    This sounds like a great update for your VERY cute gelding! His color marks are very cute, and very different. Neat!

    I think his gelding scar looks fine. I would keep working gently "up there" and get him used to him being handled there.



  12. #172
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoyleHeightsKid View Post
    Great to hear he's feeling better

    I've heard they can abscess when the foot starts to function as it should, no personal experience with that though.
    The trimmer told me to expect abscesses through the healing process. He was right! I'll take some video and pictures tonight. The difference is amazing. I think it'll take time to see full recovery but I'm taking it slow. He is learning how to move properly and learning that it doesn't hurt all the time. He is overall a much happier horse. I definitely learned my lesson to be careful on who works on your horse's feet. A few mistakes can take a year to fix. I am really liking the barefoot method so far. Several people told me to sell him because he would never move properly. But here he is proving everyone wrong.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #173
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    I watched his Jan videos & that hurt - poor guy
    BUT he was just so darn cute so I could see why you'd want to keep him even if he was never more than pasture sound

    To desensitize his scar area, you might see if you can start with a topical that does just that, then as he relaxes about your touch in that area, just use treat rewards for him settling when you touch/massage the area. If he does have significant scar tissue along the cut line, it will feel strange & unsettling to have it handled even though it's no longer painful.
    Just be very consistent about only ever rewarding all 4 legs on the ground when you touch the area; he may also try harder for special treats (fruit, stud muffins, peppermints etc).

    FP was taught to "turn away" for treats (ie neck stretches), now when he sees you with something that smells delicious, he "turns away" as his ask rather than mugging the person - of course, then the object of his attention is so impressed by his politeness, they share



  14. #174
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    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Stoystown, PA
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    FWIW... A chiro and or a massage therapist might help him along. He was VERY sore and as you may well know when your feet hurt it affects your entire body.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  15. #175
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    This is a comparison after 3 trims. He stands a lot more natural
    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...psac9d4683.jpg

    This is his current foot after 6 months of trimming
    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...ps444d5ef7.jpg



  16. #176
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    Yeah I bet it is the feet! If he was in shoes for a long time it'll take time and maybe a few abscesses to get used to being barefoot. Good luck!
    Really? Why is it necessary for a horse to suffer through multiple abscesses for the sake of barefoot at all costs?

    I realize that some folks find critical thing repulsive, but has it ever occurred to you that a competent farrier has the means and the knowhow to rehabilitate damaged and neglected feet without putting the horse through all the pain and suffering?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #177
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    . . .This is his current foot after 6 months of trimming
    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...ps444d5ef7.jpg
    Why aren't the distortion in the quarters and diverging growth rings being addressed?


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  18. #178
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    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Stoystown, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Why aren't the distortion in the quarters and diverging growth rings being addressed?
    Tom I see what you're saying about the growth rings, but can you point out the distortion in the quarters you're talking about? The pictures aren't great so hard to see...
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  19. #179
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Why aren't the distortion in the quarters and diverging growth rings being addressed?
    Are you talking about the old rings?



  20. #180
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Look at the intersection of the stripe and the rings. The wall has not been dressed to remove the distortion. That should have been done on the first trim and maintained at each appointment. When I see lack of attention to detail it makes me wonder what else has been neglected.

    OTOH, it probably is not fair for me to expect anyone who has never volunteered to be tested by their peers against a minimum professional qualification standard to meet or exceed said standards.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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