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  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    Yes I soak the beet pulp--but he hates it! Any suggestions?
    Why eat your beet pulp when you can guilt Mom into giving you yummy grain? The majority of them learn to love it.

    Grain does not = love. My horse no longer gets concentrated feed. He gets either soaked BEEP or soaked alfalfa pellets with his supplements. He thinks that is "feed" now. But I admit there were some poo-poo faces to begin with.


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  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    Why eat your beet pulp when you can guilt Mom into giving you yummy grain? The majority of them learn to love it.

    Grain does not = love. My horse no longer gets concentrated feed. He gets either soaked BEEP or soaked alfalfa pellets with his supplements. He thinks that is "feed" now. But I admit there were some poo-poo faces to begin with.
    I know. You're very right!! Are alfalfa pellets a good choice for laminitis types? I heard no because they are a legume. But they are low starch/sugar. He does like alfalfa pellets. But I'm sure he will learn to like beet pulp too. Thanks for the suggestions. I'll keep offering until he decides he wants to try



  3. #143
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    Mar. 18, 2007
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    Glad you're getting a better idea of what's going on and encouraging news. I was taught that it takes a year to grow a whole new hoof - don't know if that's true. It will not take long for his heels to open up and the soreness to start going away. Then you can post "my horse won't quit trotting" Good luck and keep us posted.


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  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    \ Are alfalfa pellets a good choice for laminitis types?
    The general concensus seems to be "some handle it some don't". Mine seems to be OK on it. My mother's horse, doesn't seem to be able to handle it as well. It can give some of them sore feet. So...

    Then there is the fact that it can be like rocket fuel to some horses.


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  5. #145
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiddenAcres View Post
    Glad you're getting a better idea of what's going on and encouraging news. I was taught that it takes a year to grow a whole new hoof - don't know if that's true. It will not take long for his heels to open up and the soreness to start going away. Then you can post "my horse won't quit trotting" Good luck and keep us posted.
    Thanks so much!! This forum has been a lifesaver!! Will keep updating his progress!



  6. #146
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    Yes I soak the beet pulp--but he hates it! Any suggestions?

    I just ordered the farriers formula 2 days ago! Great minds think alike

    I bought a grazing muzzle. I'll probably try it. I just feel awful putting those things on. I know it's for the best though! But from what the vet told me is that if I can get him straightened out and then in better shape physically, he may be ok on pasture in the future! Bottom line is that I'll do whatever I need to do!
    I wonder if your horse could have a grain free ration balancer?


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  7. #147
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    I wonder if your horse could have a grain free ration balancer?
    What is that? A replacement feed?



  8. #148
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    Mar. 4, 2004
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    Louisville, KY
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    A ration balancer is concentrated source of protein, vitamins, and minerals without anything extra. Designed to be fed at ~ 1lb a day. I think it would be a great choice for your guy. He still needs the correct amount of the above to grow and develop correctly.

    TC's version is their 30% supplement:
    http://www.triplecrownfeed.com/horse...ine-supplement

    It's very low in sugar/NSC at 9.8%
    http://www.triplecrownfeed.com/artic...rown-horsefood
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01


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  9. #149
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    I'm glad you sorted out what is wrong, and have a plan to get him straightened out. You may want to feed a multivitamin/mineral supplement such as Smart Pak Grass or a ration balancer so you are sure he is getting all the vitamins he needs. My fat boy gets a SmartPak and a handful of grain or a couple of carrots. He doesn't feel left out at dinner time, and isn't getting unnecessary calories. When a horse has laminitis or might be prone to laminitis, you want to avoid grain as much as possible. Hay, fed in the amount of 1 to 2% of body weight per day, provides most of the nutrition that most horses need.

    We're you happy with TAMU? Who was your vet?

    Laminitis is hard to fix, but knowing that is what you have is a big first step. Hopefully you will have him back to normal by spring or summer.


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  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKB View Post
    You may want to feed a multivitamin/mineral supplement such as Smart Pak Grass or a ration balancer so you are sure he is getting all the vitamins he needs.
    Our metabolic horses are on a hay diet. My mother's horse is on the Smartpak EZ Keeper Grass. My horse is on the D-Carb Balancer which I chose because his Selenium was low. His routine test last week showed that is on the high side of normal so we are going to switch to the EZ-Keeper next month. I think they are both good products. The D-Carb is considerably more expensive.


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  11. #151
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedMare01 View Post
    A ration balancer is concentrated source of protein, vitamins, and minerals without anything extra. Designed to be fed at ~ 1lb a day. I think it would be a great choice for your guy. He still needs the correct amount of the above to grow and develop correctly.

    TC's version is their 30% supplement:
    http://www.triplecrownfeed.com/horse...ine-supplement

    It's very low in sugar/NSC at 9.8%
    http://www.triplecrownfeed.com/artic...rown-horsefood
    Thanks! This could work out for him. With him being as young as he is, I definitely don't want to rob him of any nutrients he needs to finish any growing he has left. Eventually he will probably need back on grain once I start working and eventually training/showing him. I like this idea for the interim though. Seems like Triple Crown really has their stuff together for this kind of thing



  12. #152
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    Our metabolic horses are on a hay diet. My mother's horse is on the Smartpak EZ Keeper Grass. My horse is on the D-Carb Balancer which I chose because his Selenium was low. His routine test last week showed that is on the high side of normal so we are going to switch to the EZ-Keeper next month. I think they are both good products. The D-Carb is considerably more expensive.
    I do have him on Smart Pak Ez keeper grass and just started yesterday on Quiescence (spelling?). Both recommended to me by the vet and new farrier. He is also on a hoof supplement now. These will hopefully aid his recovery. D-Carb balance is another one I considered. Are your metabolic horses completely restricted from grass?



  13. #153
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKB View Post
    I'm glad you sorted out what is wrong, and have a plan to get him straightened out. You may want to feed a multivitamin/mineral supplement such as Smart Pak Grass or a ration balancer so you are sure he is getting all the vitamins he needs. My fat boy gets a SmartPak and a handful of grain or a couple of carrots. He doesn't feel left out at dinner time, and isn't getting unnecessary calories. When a horse has laminitis or might be prone to laminitis, you want to avoid grain as much as possible. Hay, fed in the amount of 1 to 2% of body weight per day, provides most of the nutrition that most horses need.

    We're you happy with TAMU? Who was your vet?

    Laminitis is hard to fix, but knowing that is what you have is a big first step. Hopefully you will have him back to normal by spring or summer.
    I really did like the TAMU vet as well as my new farrier. What I really liked was their honesty and not trying to get me to invest in a bunch of expensive tests. They also both spent a lot of time with me trying to explain the anatomy of the hoof and how diet plays a role. The TAMU vet said he might have something going on but until we get the hooves straightened out, there is no way he would want to test him for anything else. He seemed very confident though that this was the origin of all of his problems. The other vets went straight to expensive testing like bone scans and thermal imaging. The TAMU vet (Carter) said that vets tend to overlook the hoof unless it is painfully obvious...even though commonly issues begin there. I really liked him.



  14. #154
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    If you go with a ration balancer, you won't need the EZ Keeper Grass anymore. Alternatively, if you stick with just a handful of beet pulp/Low Starch/whatever, you'd keep the EZ Keeper Grass to make sure he gets the vit/min he needs. It should all come down to how many calories he needs and how much protein he's getting from his hay.

    Also remember if you go the ration balancer route, weigh to make sure he only gets 1-1.5 lbs of it per day. It's a really small amount. Probably in the 2-3 cup range.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01


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  15. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    Are your metabolic horses completely restricted from grass?
    No. The healthier one gets limited turnout. The severe one gets limited turnout with a muzzle. You have to know what kinds of grass you have, and understand how the sugars can increase during the day and from season to season. We do test our grass as well as our hay. All hay is also soaked (they seem to prefer it and it helps with water intake).


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  16. #156
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    I'm glad the vet visit worked out well. I have had a lot of good experiences at our vet school clinic. When you have a difficult problem it usually makes sense to head to a vet school clinic.


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  17. #157
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    . . . The TAMU vet (Carter) said that vets tend to overlook the hoof unless it is painfully obvious...even though commonly issues begin there. I really liked him.
    There is a good reason this happens. There is no requirement whatsoever that a vet have any training on the hoof and/or farriery in order to obtain a degree in veterinary medicine. Add to that the fact that there is no requirement that a farrier have any training at all.

    In over a decade of full time practice I can count on one hand the number of horse owners who have questioned my training and qualifications before making a hiring decision. When it comes to hoof care, "Highly recommended" means the same thing as "political appointment."


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  18. #158
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    Well heck Tom, haven't you figured it out from reading CoTH? The first and foremost qualifications for a good farrier is that he
    A. Calls back
    B. Shows up

    We'll deal with the rest later.

    P.S. has anyone ever heard back from the farrier who was having truck problems and was stopping by his buddy's for some mechanicking? I still think that one's been murdered.



  19. #159
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    Nov. 15, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post

    P.S. has anyone ever heard back from the farrier who was having truck problems and was stopping by his buddy's for some mechanicking? I still think that one's been murdered.
    Just read that thread... I'd be checking obituaries if I was the client (then again, I am paranoid like that! LOL) How strange... Now I'm curious!



  20. #160
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    Nov. 15, 2009
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    OP - I am glad things are starting to look up! I also think a balance rationer is a good idea - I used McCauley's M30 on yearlings that were having issues with epiphysitis with good success.



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