The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 56789 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 140 of 185
  1. #121
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    4,007

    Default

    Good luck! Many jingles that you figure out what's wrong with him.

    I will say, coming from looking at a lot of Saddlebreds with upright hooves...those are some funky feet. You can't fix his conformation, but I bet a good farrier will do a world of good.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  2. #122
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    3,517

    Default

    I'm glad you have an appointment at Texas A and M. Can you just leave the shoes on until you go there? It is only 2 weeks. If he is really long, you can't, but I'd hate to get new shoes next week and then pull them and reshoe a week later.

    Get a written report from the farrier as well as the vets, and take a friend with you. I know how stressed I get when I have a lame horse. I only hear about half of what I am told.



  3. #123
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Posts
    2,544

    Default

    I'm going to be different, and say that I think he just doesn't know how to trot. He probably is more comfortable cantering, but regardless, he is putting no impulsion into either the trot or the canter in the videos. My big Paint horse, when he came, was the same way--preferred to canter rather than trot. Fox hunting, trail riding, etc. did wonders for his trot, and now he will walk/trot/canter. He wasn't as bad about not trotting as your horse, but on a longe he really would only walk and canter. Now he'll do all three. My paint was a big 4 year old gelding--big at 16.3H--and definately still wasn't very coordinated. Now, at six, he finally feels more mature and more coordinated.
    I guess if he were my horse, and noone had seen any problems lameness-wise, I would work on the trot either under saddle, or, if not broke to ride, on long-lines. I would work on the trot in those manners because it will give you more of a chance to control what he is doing. I would practice trot--not canter. But that is just my opinion.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
    Posts
    210

    Default

    I hope it goes well at A & M! Also, I didn't read every post so someone may have said it already, but have you tested for Lyme/other tick diseases? A characteristic can be that the lameness is hard to detect and it turns into an overall stiffness. It would be an amazingly simple solution! I hope that might be the case!

    Also, there's a lot of talk of EPM which is the possum poop neurological one, but no one seems to have mentioned EPSM which is the no starch one? Someone correct me if I'm wrong?



  5. #125
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2007
    Posts
    338

    Default Good Luck at A&M

    Let us know how the appointment goes. Hope you get some new ideas that help.



  6. #126
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    A state of confusion
    Posts
    817

    Default

    mrg8302 - hope the trip to TAMU went well and you got some good news. I am going to send you a PM about some farriers in your area.



  7. #127
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Hi there everyone that has been following! Well I took Doc to A&M. Didn't get any for sure answers but I think I got pointed on the right track. His feet. The farrier at A&M wasn't able to make it. But the vet was fairly certain his feet are at least a major contributor to this mystery lameness. He did all the regular tests and took new X-rays of the feet. But he didn't want to spend a bunch of money on tests until his feet were ruled out with time and diet changes. He said that wall bruising, contracted heels, and deep rings pointed to something going on with his feet. No rotation thank goodness but evidence of inflammation was everywhere. He recommended pulling the shoes off, changing diet, and letting the feet grow out a nice healthy foot. Then if there is still lameness, we will pursue the more intrusive testing.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,441

    Default

    Glad you are getting answers.

    Sore feet seem like something all the other people looking would have noticed long ago.



  9. #129
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kmmoran View Post
    I hope it goes well at A & M! Also, I didn't read every post so someone may have said it already, but have you tested for Lyme/other tick diseases? A characteristic can be that the lameness is hard to detect and it turns into an overall stiffness. It would be an amazingly simple solution! I hope that might be the case!


    Also, there's a lot of talk of EPM which is the possum poop neurological one, but no one seems to have mentioned EPSM which is the no starch one? Someone correct me if I'm wrong?
    We had him tested for Lyme, PSSM and EPM. Also did a full blood panel. Everything normal and/or negative.



  10. #130
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Glad you are getting answers.

    Sore feet seem like something all the other people looking would have noticed long ago.
    Well the first vet did find the sore feet but he just told me it was thin soles. That's when I put shoes on and the problem got worse! He then was negative to the hoof testers and nerve block so I ruled it out in my head. But according to A&M that is common. Makes complete sense--if his feet all hurt due to low grade laminitis or something else, at least it makes sense that no one could really even tell which limb it was in.

    The shoes are off and he immediately moves more comfortably.



  11. #131
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    Stoystown, PA
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Glad you're finally getting some answers! Hopefully you can find a farrier that can help him. I bet it won't be long before he's feeling MUCH better! YAY!!!
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  12. #132
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BoyleHeightsKid View Post
    Glad you're finally getting some answers! Hopefully you can find a farrier that can help him. I bet it won't be long before he's feeling MUCH better! YAY!!!
    Thanks! the vet at A&M felt really confident that his feet had been through a lot of stress either from diet changes, grass, training, the 6 hour trip, gelding, or most likely a combination of everything. Comparing his feet from when I first got him until now make me feel guilty. But all I can do is learn and correct. Looking back, I took a stalled horse eating oats and hay and put him on grass (small pen but still) changed to a pelleted feed (over several days but still) then I put shoes on him from a bad farrier and hauled him all over the place to vets, put him at a trainer for 2 weeks....all of that in 3 months!?!?! No wonder. I feel terrible but happy it isn't looking to be something irreversible or permanent. Hopefully now I get his diet figured out and all will be well soon.

    I really like the guy who trimmed his feet this last time and pulled the shoes. He spent a lot of time explaining what he saw and how hoof health is all about the overall health of the horse. He told me that in his experience, 90% of lameness is originally caused by the hoof. Here is hoping!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #133
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    A state of confusion
    Posts
    817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    I really like the guy who trimmed his feet this last time and pulled the shoes. He spent a lot of time explaining what he saw and how hoof health is all about the overall health of the horse. He told me that in his experience, 90% of lameness is originally caused by the hoof. Here is hoping!
    Very wise farrier indeed! A good farrier is so important. Makes me love mine even more.



  14. #134
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    Stoystown, PA
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Did the vet give you a diet for him?
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  15. #135
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BoyleHeightsKid View Post
    Did the vet give you a diet for him?
    Sorta-- but I would love advice. The vet and farrier both said to pull all grain and only feed hay (and beet pulp if I felt like I needed to feed him something. Maybe a handful of triple crown low starch to get him to eat his supplements. (He recommended hoof supplement and quiescence to kick start the recovery). Then after a month or two when we start to see results, slowly reintroduce grain but at a lower amount (again recommended was triple crown low starch). The farrier looked at my pasture and said since it was mostly dead that it'd be ok for him to be out on. But we may have to pull him off in the spring. I've read about soaking hay and asked about it but was told it would be ok to give him dry hay since he wasn't a severe laminitis case.

    Any input on low starch/sugar feed? He obviously did ok on oats before I had him but that isn't low starch/sugar from what I understand. I feel guilty not feeding him grain but I suppose that is something I'll have to get over! He hasn't touched the beet pulp pellets.



  16. #136
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Oh and also-- any idea how long to start to see results? I'm not trying to rush him-- I just want to know its working! The vet suggested giving him one month off of work and then begin to work him very slowly.



  17. #137
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
    Posts
    324

    Default

    Are you soaking those beet pulp pellets? Im sure you are but just wanted to make sure

    Maybe your guy will be able to wear a muzzle this spring so you dont have to pull him off grass completely.

    Farriers formula double strength is a good supplement if you have not made a choice yet. I also really like quiescence. Sounds like you are on the right track!



  18. #138
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2011
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ActNatural View Post
    Are you soaking those beet pulp pellets? Im sure you are but just wanted to make sure

    Maybe your guy will be able to wear a muzzle this spring so you dont have to pull him off grass completely.

    Farriers formula double strength is a good supplement if you have not made a choice yet. I also really like quiescence. Sounds like you are on the right track!
    Yes I soak the beet pulp--but he hates it! Any suggestions?

    I just ordered the farriers formula 2 days ago! Great minds think alike

    I bought a grazing muzzle. I'll probably try it. I just feel awful putting those things on. I know it's for the best though! But from what the vet told me is that if I can get him straightened out and then in better shape physically, he may be ok on pasture in the future! Bottom line is that I'll do whatever I need to do!



  19. #139
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
    Posts
    324

    Default

    in the past, i mixed BP with a little bit of pellets to get mine to eat it. She turned her nose up for a few days but gradually picked at it until she decided it wasnt poison


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #140
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,441

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrg8302 View Post
    Yes I soak the beet pulp--but he hates it! Any suggestions?
    Have you tried the just keep offering it idea?
    I started feeding soaked alfalfa cubes to one of mine. When I started she would not eat them. Next feeding I would just dump those out, clean the bucket and put in new. It took a few days but she eventually tried them and now eats them very willingly.


    2 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Lame Thoroughbred Is... Still Lame: Final Update
    By erniewalker in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 83
    Last Post: Dec. 5, 2012, 11:05 AM
  2. Lame at the trot, one way
    By anna's girl in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Oct. 9, 2012, 12:37 AM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Aug. 21, 2012, 08:10 AM
  4. standardbred mare lame ONLY at trot?
    By Hampton Bay in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: May. 6, 2012, 08:19 AM
  5. Lame at walk, sound at trot
    By Eventingjunkie in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May. 18, 2011, 12:20 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness