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  1. #61
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    This is a little clip of him trotting

    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...105CACD07F.mp4



  2. #62
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    To the left at a lope

    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y12...162FFB48B0.mp4

    I only worked him 5-10 min. And only done that a handful of times



  3. #63
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    Something is weird in the jog/trot idk what. Usually I'm pretty good at finding it. I'm thinking maybe right front but he seems really funky IMO at the trot. Something is off, wish I coulD be more help sorry
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  4. #64
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    Also he doesn't track up as well on the left side.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  5. #65
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    16,386

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    He looks lame on the left hind to me, but it's tough to tell if those skipping steps are due to him wanting to step up into the canter or just him being wonky.

    How do his stifles feel? Any effusion? Does that joint ever click when he moves? Does he swing either hind foot under his body, or does he come straight forward with the foot/limb?



  6. #66
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    Yeah no one seems to be able to put a finger on it. But everyone agrees something is off.

    The vets all checked his stifles and found nothing. We checked all joints (flexion texts and X-ray). Nothing so far. One vet suggested I try to sell him as a flashy gaited trail horse. Awful huh? No joint clicking that I've ever heard. Right front and left hind seem kinda short strided to me but its hard to tell.



  7. #67
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    1,162

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    OP, I know this is something lots suggest, but have you tried treating for ulcers? Also, do you have a vet that uses a lameness locator (hooked up to horse) to help find lameness?



  8. #68
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    Ulcers? Never thought of that. Would such a young horse have ulcers? They make them move funny? I thought about taking him for a thermal scan--is that what you're talking about? After the heavy bute didn't change anything, vet said it wasn't likely pain related. I just don't know



  9. #69
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Well my horse was having issues trotting for a while. He was not as bad as you described your horse, but he'd always want to canter and not trot. Under saddle he flat out refused. Something seemed strange with his right hind though but hard to see.

    Got the vet out and we detected something in the RH via the computer. Xrays clean. Rested for 30 plus days and *I* decided to treat for ulcers. Two weeks now back under saddle and no issues trotting.

    This horse lives a very stress free life at home, but is a worrier. I would not have guessed ulcers (although he had them when I got him) given his lifestyle and turnout 24/7. I also put him on a hind gut digestion supplement in addition to the pop rocks. I read sometimes there can be hind end lameness with hind gut ulcers.

    Might seems strange, but I'm not entirely sure my horses slight lameness was due to something in his legs and more something in his stomach/hind gut causing the issue.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2003
    Posts
    277

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    He looks lame to me too in left hind. Could be more than that though because he looks overall stiff and uncomfortable behind. Also, he looks lame at trot and canter to me. A sweetie though who looks like he's trying for you.

    I've heard that halter horses are often overfed at a young age so that they grow fast and develop the halter look early. It can have a bad effect on their structural development. I've never owned a halter-bred horse so haven't looked into this, but, in your shoes, I'd probably do some research on the (alleged) problem.

    Be sure to look carefully and critically at his feet. Lots of weird problems can be traced, at least in part, to incorrect trim/shoeing.



  11. #71
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    I think he is lame in both front legs. Did the vet try nerve blocking his feet to see if there is any evidence of navicular problems?



  12. #72
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    Yes he blocked both front feet with no change. This is quite the mystery.



  13. #73
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    Did you ultrasound the stifle? Radiographs definitely don't tell the whole story in that joint. Ultrasound allows you to visualize the soft tissue.

    I'd also be suspicious of the SI. Ultrasound/rectal palpation might be interesting.

    Although I would certainly wouldn't blame you if you're tired of the vet and just kick him out for six months. I still think that's a very valid option at this point.



  14. #74
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    What is SI? I really am so frustrated and also really can't afford much more at this point. I've had 3 vets and 3 farriers look at him. Plus a trainer. I've spent half of what I paid for him. I'm just really sad and disappointed. Maybe time off will help but I'm skeptical at this point.



  15. #75
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    Were they good nerve blocks or was he anxious and uncooperative? If the vet couldn't get the local anesthetic in, it wouldn't show effectiveness.

    I would give yourself and your finances a bit of a rest, then head for the nearest vet school for a lameness evaluation. I think he is quite lame. The problem is figuring out where and why. So many things are easily treatable, once you figure out what is wrong.



  16. #76
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    May. 20, 2008
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    941

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    Based on my experiences, I'd also suspect his SI (sacroilliac) joints. Basically, his pelvis.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    My thought is that he is young. So maybe just give him some more time to grow up. Maybe just turn him out until he is 4 and then try again. Then down the road if he is still not seeming right go to a big vet school that has all the diagnostics.

    Good Luck!
    Last edited by Fharoah; Dec. 14, 2012 at 01:57 AM.



  18. #78
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    Nov. 15, 2009
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    381

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    Did you check the right front shoulder? Bone skeletal and muscular? Appears that he is reluctant to move out his right front from the shoulder, his left front is a touch more free moving. He is funky behind but that could be from trying to take weight off the front. Definitely a wonky jogger - something is definitely wrong and I think it is much more than just being young - millions of young, gangly horses trot just fine at all ages. This is more than that.



  19. #79
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    Sep. 22, 2011
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    106

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    The vet checked his right shoulder through x-ray and flexion. Found nothing. He agreed that he tends not to advance the right front as much as the left. Here are some more videos--a couple from the trainer when he wasn't trotting at all. He definitely prefers to be on his left lead at a lope opposed to his right, but he will pick it up.

    http://s4.beta.photobucket.com/user/...FE5E3.mp4.html

    http://s4.beta.photobucket.com/user/...5E49A.mp4.html

    http://s4.beta.photobucket.com/user/...B48B0.mp4.html



  20. #80
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Might want to get your vet to do PDN (posterior digital nerve) blocks on both fronts again. IME it is very common for a vet to miss the nerve and assume the foot is blocked when it isn't. Especially with vets that do not do a lot of lameness diagnostic work in their daily practice. With a successful PDN block, the horse will not feel a ball point pen poking into its heel bulbs. If it does, then the nerve is not blocked.

    Looks bilaterally heel sore on both fronts, worse on RF.


    3 members found this post helpful.

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