The Chronicle of the Horse
 
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2013
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    460

    Default ottb ribs, can't seem to hide em

    Just wondering opinions on ribs showing on a horse. I can't load pictures. I know, I suck. Horse is filled out everywhere else, shiny, good hooves, happy, eats well, vet checked, on a recommended worming schedule, ridden (lightly, not in a rigorous training program) at least a few times a week, grass turnout 24/7, grain is safegaurd and he is also fed empower (rice bran). Feeding schedule 2x/day 1 LARGE coffee can (approx 2.5 lbs) safeguard plus one SMALL coffee can empower each feeding... etc, his ribs just show, but only from certain angles. I hate to bring this up bc its so taboo on COTH but ulcers? He burps... often. He had what seemed like gas colic once after working himself up on the first trailer ride of the year. So I have ulcer gard to give him now before trailering. Haven't had any further issues with colic. Any way, scoping him is at least at this point out of the question. So I either spend a fortune on ulcer or gastro gard for treatment or I keep just using it as preventative. If he does have ulcers, he isn't having any ill effects that I notice EXCEPT if its linked to his ribs showing.

    Sooooo, are ribs showing unacceptable or is it maybe that my horse's ribs just stick out? My ribs stick out. I'm not underweight. Also I'm not a horse but just saying. He looks so good to me, but I see those ribs and wonder if people are thinking I'm a bad mommy?

    Thoughts?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default

    No suggestions, but I'll be interested to see other replies. I have a big TB mare that sounds like yours—minus the burping. She puts on weight everywhere but over the ribcage. And everyone agrees she is, at the minimum, pleasingly plump! You can only see the lines of the ribs when the sun hits her just right. I think maybe some horses just store their weight differently, like people.

    Flame suit on, anyway!!!
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive



  3. #3
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    Aug. 24, 2007
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    Default

    My vet said its perfectly fine to see ribs on a TB, in fact she expects to... That said, it is all a matter of degrees. Hard to say without photos..



  4. #4
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    We really do need a picture

    By "ribs showing" what exactly do you mean? If you can see all of them, that's too thin. If you can see the last few, that's perfect.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    In an attempt to not offend anyone.....Safeguard would not be my first choice for any horse, nevermind a TB.

    Get him on a good senior feed, or other high fiber/low starch food. I imagine once you start him on some sort of beet-pulp based food (as most senior grains are) you'll start to see improvement.

    Then again, if it's just a few ribs in a certain light...that's a perfectly acceptable weight for a TB. Or any horse!



  6. #6
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    May. 6, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    We really do need a picture

    By "ribs showing" what exactly do you mean? If you can see all of them, that's too thin. If you can see the last few, that's perfect.
    Ok ok! I'm trying. Please let me know if this works!!!!

    https://m.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?...00000218164038



  7. #7
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    And another showing his roundness in my opinion walking away from the pony.
    https://m.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?...00000218164038



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoForAGallop View Post
    In an attempt to not offend anyone.....Safeguard would not be my first choice for any horse, nevermind a TB.

    Get him on a good senior feed, or other high fiber/low starch food. I imagine once you start him on some sort of beet-pulp based food (as most senior grains are) you'll start to see improvement.

    Then again, if it's just a few ribs in a certain light...that's a perfectly acceptable weight for a TB. Or any horse!
    I'm not offended but why is safe choice bad? It's high fiber low starch complete feed. Oh I see I called it safe gard don't even know what that is... Its SafeChoice...
    Last edited by Ruby2shoes; Jun. 5, 2013 at 12:14 PM. Reason: misprint in first post



  9. #9
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Link doesn't work, but at least you have it on FB Make sure the picture/album is set to public, but beyond that, I'm not sure how you grab the link from a phone (the m.facebook is the trigger for it coming from a phone). From my phone there's not an option to copy the image url but obviously you have something like that. The message I get is that the link is broken, which makes me think the literal copy includes the "..." as opposed to the full url.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruby2shoes View Post
    I'm not offended but why is safe choice bad? It's high fiber low starch complete feed.
    I can't find any reference to a "Safeguard" horse feed, so did you mean Safechoice? if so, that's not a low starch feed - it's in the 18% range. If you really did mean Safeguard, who makes it?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  11. #11
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Middle Tennessee
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    No go on the pictures-- the links don't work for me! Like others have said, it really depends on the degree of ribbiness.

    I'm not familiar with Safeguard feed... only the wormer.

    Best I can suggest is lots and lots of hay and forage (free choice), a quality protein source-- either in a low starch feed or supplemented somehow, balanced vitamins and minerals, and additional fat as needed.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  12. #12
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    Dang it dang it dang it! Can I email one of you the pix and you could post them for me???? YES SAFECHOICE SORRY



  13. #13
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    Feb. 8, 2006
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    NE OK
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    Meh, people get all bent out of shape over a little rb. Ain't a bad thing on a horse or a dog. Much better than the fat preferred in the hunter ring.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    http://www.nutrenaworld.com/products...feed/index.jsp So "controlled starch" not low starch??? Dang it again!!! I thought it was! Well this isn't helping his ulcers then!! CRAP! Feed recomemdations? I tried really dang hard to get that one right. FAIL



  15. #15
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    I'll message you my email
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  16. #16
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    If y'all log in to facebook can you see em?



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I'll message you my email
    I sent two pix to your email JB. THANKS!!!!



  18. #18
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    Picture!

    One

    Two

    #2 looks great, perfect actually.

    #1 is a little ribby, but I'd sort of expect that for a nicely lean horse who's in a pose like that.

    Could use a LITTLE more weight? Maybe. #1 makes him look a little thin but mostly because it looks like he could use more topline. Were these taken at the same time? The color is quite different but that could be due to different time of year or could just be the exposure of the picture.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  19. #19
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    The problem with SafeChoice isn't as much "controlled starch" versus "low starch," it's just a mediocre quality product on the whole. Your calories and protein are coming from soybean hulls, rice hulls, wheat middlings, and corn. Not ideal sources for horses, especially not in conjunction with each other.

    Feed companies aren't trying to harm your horses per se, but they are trying to make a buck. Many will use cheap filler ingredients and balance them out with vitamins and minerals to make them comparable to higher-quality feeds. Nutrena is notorious for that.

    Some brands I'd recommend: Triple Crown, Buckeye, Progressive, ADM... Pennfield makes a great product called Fibregized. Blue Seal makes a product called Sentinel which is supposed to be quite good. McCauleys has an interesting product called Alam.

    Overall, what I'd look for is high quality ingredients: beet pulp, alfalfa meal, rice bran, flax. Minimal grains-- stay away from feeds high in oats, corn, and barley. If it has all 3-- RUN. It is not what your horse needs to gain weight. Soy is a bit of a sticky wicket these days and earns a bad rap. You'll be hard pressed to find a feed without it, just make sure it's in conjunction with other good ingredients. It's an excellent protein source. Also, look for feeds with higher fat content and higher fiber content... although those two things alone can be misleading without considering the whole package.

    Another thing to consider is a ration balancer and adding in supplemental calories in the form of forage supplements and fat. That way you know your horse is getting sufficient vitamins and minerals and protein in a low-starch package and you control the form of extra calories.

    And hay. Don't forget hay. At least 2% of your horses body weight in forage a day (about 20lbs for a 1000lb horse), or else you're never going to get anywhere.

    Hope this helps!
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Thanks for posting the pix and for the opinions on feeds. I'm PO'd at myself and I thought I was making a "SafeChoice" ha but seriously! In pic #2 be sure we are looking at the copper chestnut TB walking away and not the sorrel roan FAT A** quarter pony. These pix were taken minutes apart.



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