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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,310

    Unhappy Dog ate a cooked chicken thigh: to vomit, or not?

    We got a little rescue dog (terrier x, 18mo) on Friday, and she'd only been spayed 24 hours before, which came as a bit of a surprise, but she's doing fine.

    Had to take her to the spca's vet yesterday because there seemed to be a minor infection around the incision, and she's now on Metacam and Clavaseptin until she gets her stitches out next week.

    (The vet was dismayed to learn she'd been adopted so soon after surgery; their recommendation is to wait 10 days and/or until the stitches have been removed.)

    Definitely a high energy type (very!), otherwise very healthy, if a bit skinny still.

    She chose to work on weight gain all by herself 10 minutes ago by climbing on to the kitchen counter and gobling down a roasted chicken thigh that was cooling up there. No evidence, of course, except a little chicken grease on the floor.

    So - should I get her to throw it up, monitor for interesting poop over the next day or two, whip her off to the vet immediately, or....?
    Last edited by Romany; Nov. 28, 2012 at 04:39 PM. Reason: wrong emoticon!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,727

    Default

    The chicken part was whole, with cooked bones in it? No, do not induce vomiting, puking back up sharp bone fragments could lacerate her esophagus. I'd probably call your vet and ask for advice. If it were one of my big, healthy, dogs I'd probably just keep an eye on them for a few days, but since yours just had surgery, etc...I'd give the vet a call. They may just tell you to watch her.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,310

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    Hmm...that's pretty much what I thought, thanks.

    I called the vet, and they corroborated what you say, too; watch, and wait (all systems should be normal - any changes are a cause for concern; she'll probably get diarrhea anyway), and go through the poop for bones, oh joy and rapture.

    I've scheduled an appointment to have an xray taken tomorrow afternoon, just to see what's going on in there.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, VA
    Posts
    1,369

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    No advice to offer, but certainly have lots of jingles to send your way- hope everything comes out ok
    stained glass groupie
    www.equiglas.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by Romany View Post
    We got a little rescue dog (terrier x, 18mo) on Friday, and she'd only been spayed 24 hours before, which came as a bit of a surprise, but she's doing fine.


    (The vet was dismayed to learn she'd been adopted so soon after surgery; their recommendation is to wait 10 days and/or until the stitches have been removed.)
    Ugh. Been there, done that. When we adopted our Walker Coonhound, she too was not only seriously underweight, but had just been spayed the day before being taken to the local "adoption event" at a local PetSmart. We weren't informed of that (although we did, of course, notice the incision) until the day after we adopted her when the shelter phone us to check up on her. When I asked them why, for all things holy, they'd put her out there in that condition, their answer was that since it was the week before Xmas & she was in such bad shape, they figured she'd have a better a chance of getting a home & wouldn't have to spend the holidays at the shelter/pound. Who was I to argue - we ended up with a great dog & a great dog got a great home. (And I do have to admit that the fact that it was a week before Xmas & she was in such crummy shape that our hearts melted on sight. But I still don't agree with putting dogs like that out for adoption.)
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
    Posts
    5,488

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    And now you know she's got the counter-surfer gene, so can take appropriate measures to keep food out of reach and train her that counters are off-limits!

    We adopted our shep-X Simon when he was just over a year old. He'd been returned from one adoptive home, but whoever had him first evidently taught him that the kitchen is off-limits, period. He will NOT come in the kitchen. Stand in the entryway and observe (and hope something gets tossed his way), yes. But he won't cross the threshold. Lance, on the other hand, is constantly underfoot. It's never occurred to either dog to steal food from the counter, fortunately.



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