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  1. #1
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    Question Horse Shoe Question For Farriers.

    Is it possible to reshape (iron) front shoes with a forge, so as to fit the more oval hind feet?



  2. #2
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    I'm not a farrier, and I didn't sleep at Holiday Inn, but if your horse has a wider than average hind foot, it should be possible for a farrier to shape a shoe to fit it..
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  3. #3
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    Once upon a time horseshoes were fashioned from straight bars of steel or iron or whatever material was in use at the time. A good farrier could easily make a front shoe fit a hind hoof or vice versa if needed. Not sure how or why that would be easier than starting with a hind shoe and being that far ahead of the game, but I'll bet it's do-able.
    Click here before you buy.



  4. #4
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    Just a shot in the dark - are you wondering if you can get another season out of a pair of winter shoes with caulks by putting a set you already have on a different pair of feet? My farrier is a great guy, and if I hung them on my horse's stall with a note asking if he thought he could reshape them and get another season out of them, he'd tell me honestly if he thought he could. But be prepared for the answer that it's almost less work to simply start with a new set, than monkey around with an old set.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by betsyk View Post
    Just a shot in the dark - are you wondering if you can get another season out of a pair of winter shoes with caulks by putting a set you already have on a different pair of feet? My farrier is a great guy, and if I hung them on my horse's stall with a note asking if he thought he could reshape them and get another season out of them, he'd tell me honestly if he thought he could. But be prepared for the answer that it's almost less work to simply start with a new set, than monkey around with an old set.
    I have 2 sets of borium'd front shoes - very little wear. I am going to need to shoe all the way around this year, as horse is out 24/7 and his pasture is very hilly; he slides around behind (barefoot) in the mud, I don't want to even think about an ice storm. Checking on CoTH first to see if it's a doable idea before asking farrier if it would save me $$.



  6. #6
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    ...as long as the horse wears the same size in the back as he does in the front, the plate can be reshaped.


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  7. #7
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    The shoes, in the hands of a good mechanic can absolutely be forged to fit whatever size and shape is needed. That said, since the borium has already been amended to the shoes, heating those shoes will probably cause the bond between the borium and the shoe to fail and the borium will come off. Far better to have a new set of shoes made to correctly fit the hooves and then have fresh borium applied.


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  8. #8
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    Beside that, no matter how good the shoes look, they are already worn on the sole surface to fit the foot that wore them.. People and horses shouldn't wear OP's or OH's shoes.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  9. #9
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    But when one trims the hoof to reset a shoe, how would there be any residual "fit" between hoof and shoe?
    Click here before you buy.


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  10. #10
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    If you look at the sole surface of the shoe, you 'll see shiny grooves. so sometimes the ground surface looks good but the sole surface shows wear.

    Either Tom or Rick will happily jump in to swat me if I'm too far wrong, or even a little bit.
    Last edited by merrygoround; Nov. 28, 2012 at 07:26 PM. Reason: spelling
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    If you look at the sole surface of the shoe, you 'll see shiny grooves. so sometimes the ground surface looks good but the sole surface shows wear.
    Shoes should not touch the sole . . .


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nasalberry View Post
    I have 2 sets of borium'd front shoes - very little wear. I am going to need to shoe all the way around this year, as horse is out 24/7 and his pasture is very hilly; he slides around behind (barefoot) in the mud, I don't want to even think about an ice storm. Checking on CoTH first to see if it's a doable idea before asking farrier if it would save me $$.
    If you're that hard up for cash you probably ought to find a more affordable hobby.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    If you're that hard up for cash you probably ought to find a more affordable hobby.
    I've had this horse since he was 5 months old. I'm too crippled to ride much, but I'm not sending him to slaughter just because I'm a bit poor right now. I don't get rid of my animals - they are with me for life. I've cut out Direct TV, and other frivolous things; sold some items, etc. Cut corners where and when I can.


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  14. #14
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    Borium does not provide ANY traction, only prevents shoe wear.

    Drilltex provides traction and wear protection.

    For a horse that is not driven on the road daily, ice studs are much better traction than Drilltex.

    Drive-in ice studs do not wear out, can be removed and replaced (reuseable), and cost less in time and labor to apply.

    <Click here for Ice Stud Image>

    Available here -

    Ray Steele DBA Horseshoes Unlimited
    Contact Information

    800-356-7776
    413-863-2443
    FAX 413 863-3671
    Postal address
    521 Main Road
    Gill, MA 01354
    ray@bestbuyhorseshoes.com



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Shoes should not touch the sole . . .
    Smarty pants!! But the sole side of the shoe does touch the hoof wall, which in its expansion and contraction wears grooves in the metal--as you darned well know.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  16. #16
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    Thanks for all of the suggestions - I'll speak to my farrier about the options.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Borium does not provide ANY traction, only prevents shoe wear
    Umm, what?! No traction? Try trotting a horse down the road, with borium and without. Maybe you are referring to something else?
    *Absolut Equestrian*

    "The plural of anecdote is not fact...except in the horse industry"



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absolut Equestrian View Post
    Umm, what?! No traction? Try trotting a horse down the road, with borium and without. Maybe you are referring to something else?
    I wondered about this as well. Can you explain? Unless you meant 'no traction on ice', but if so, why is it used for that?



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absolut Equestrian View Post
    Umm, what?! No traction? Try trotting a horse down the road, with borium and without. Maybe you are referring to something else?
    Try learning the difference between Borium and Driltex.

    Borium is fine (fine like dust) tungsten particles in steel. It is applied in a thin layer with a torch or TIG welder prevent surface wear on tools and in some cases horseshoes. Boruim has a slick smooth surface. In skilled hands it can be applied with a torch in such a way that it has fine points projecting from the ground surface of the shoe to provide grip, but the points break off quite easily. Tungsten pins are easier to apply and do a better job.

    Driltex is coarse tungsten particles (coarse like pieces of pencil lead) in brass. It is applied using a torch or a forge in thick sections. The brass wears away leaving the coarse tungsten particles exposed to grip the road. This is the traction of choice for Amish road horses and it is what most people mean when they say "borium" because, well it's common ignorance that keeps getting passed around.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    Smarty pants!! But the sole side of the shoe does touch the hoof wall, which in its expansion and contraction wears grooves in the metal--as you darned well know.
    If the heels are wearing grooves in the foot surface of the shoe then the heels are overloaded due to excess ground force toe leverage.

    A foot that is shod to correct biomechanical proportions does not wear grooves in the heel of the shoe - even after several resets - because the weight is distributed evenly over the entire foot surface of the shoe instead of concentrated at the heels.



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