The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,572

    Default Sellers changing prices...annoyed!

    Twice recently this has happened.

    Case #1: horse advertised as $1200.00, so I contact seller right away. We then text back and forth (she sent me photos and such) but she couldn't show me the horse for 8 days. The she pushed back one more day. Day before I was to go look, she texts to say she isn't sure she wants to sell, but I could come see her and make an offer. I then see her ad now reads $3000, so I call, and she says that for me she will take $2500. She hadn't even ridden the horse in that 9 days, so not like it learned a new skill. Didn't even have an arena to show me the mare, or a trailer to haul her to onw, so I said no thanks, that is too much $$ for me to spend on a horse I can't properly try. Of course she texted me a few days ago to see if I was still interested...

    Case #2: Seller contacted me with a horse she only wanted $1000 for. She sent me pictures, and we talked back and forth a bit, so today I ask how much would she want to haul him here...now his price is $2500 with hauling, as her trainer said the original price was too low. Any maybe it was...but the upping the price with nothing more to show for it annoys me!

    Should i get over it and negotiate? Or should I listen to my gut that is telling me the owner felt the horse was only a $1000 horse...

    Just annoyed with horse shopping.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,521

    Default

    Do they say why the price was more than doubled?

    When I sell young horses, my prices always are good through a certain date. If someone is in the process of talking to me when a price change occurs, I will honor the lower price.

    Sounds like you ran into some loopy sellers, CHT. Just keep looking. I am sure you'll find the horse you want for the price that you have in mind.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2000
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    970

    Default

    ugh this happened to me as well - a young OTTB I tried went from 5k to 15k in the span of 9 days! Guess the seller had additional interest. I had been ready to make an offer but walked away - the horse did eventually sell for somewhere in between those amounts months later. And, to add insult to injury, horse was originally listed at 5k OBO - with seller indicating she was open to negotiation. Oy.

    There are plenty of fish in the sea OP...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
    Posts
    2,863

    Default

    I had a conversation with a woman who came into the tack store while I was picking over the bulletin board looking for possible boarding barns when I had to move.

    She was there to pull down an ad she had put up a few days before. We chatted as she was pulling down the old ad and putting up her new ad. She said that she had such a strong response to the ad that had the horse priced at $1,500 that she decided she had under-priced the horse. So she increased her asking price. I didn't ask how she handled people who responded to the original ad with the lower price, and she didn't volunteer that information.
    Sheilah



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    15,904

    Default

    Clear warning signs that these sellers are nuts and you're better off without these horses. It's one thing to increase a price if you have done something to increase the horse's value-- but increasing it just because you think you have a buyer on the hook is a recipe to NOT sell the horse.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    517

    Default

    That happens a lot with horses listed for sale by private sellers. What really annoys me is when the price goes up after you try the horse and it goes well. Seller is suddenly thinking hey, maybe this pasture puff is nicer than I thought.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,572

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marengo View Post
    That happens a lot with horses listed for sale by private sellers. What really annoys me is when the price goes up after you try the horse and it goes well. Seller is suddenly thinking hey, maybe this pasture puff is nicer than I thought.
    That would make me come unhinged!

    Neither horse was even RIDDEN between price A and price B, so nothing was done to add to their price.

    I do think the $1000 horse was likely underpriced, so may meet her partway or I may just move on. Unlike the first case, this seller seems to have put some effort into getting photos and a video...video is kinda useless, but at least it shows he is rideable and sane.

    it is funny; for months into my search I couldn't find a decently sized gelding for anything and now they are popping up here and there, so starting to feel more optimistic. I just HATE shopping and want it over with, but that is the wrong attitude I know!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Posts
    416

    Default

    Hang in there. I just finished my horse shopping which took six months, and I didn't get exactly what I was looking for, but close enough. It reaches a point where you begin to wonder if your requirements are too high, the horse you're looking for doesn't exist, and why do all the horses I rode years ago seem to be so much better?

    I hate horse shopping, too. It seems like people lose their minds when selling, although I have to admit I didn't have anyone try to raise the price once I was interested. But somehow the horses were never quite like the description in their ads.


    Quote Originally Posted by CHT View Post
    That would make me come unhinged!

    Neither horse was even RIDDEN between price A and price B, so nothing was done to add to their price.

    I do think the $1000 horse was likely underpriced, so may meet her partway or I may just move on. Unlike the first case, this seller seems to have put some effort into getting photos and a video...video is kinda useless, but at least it shows he is rideable and sane.

    it is funny; for months into my search I couldn't find a decently sized gelding for anything and now they are popping up here and there, so starting to feel more optimistic. I just HATE shopping and want it over with, but that is the wrong attitude I know!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,695

    Default

    If the ad doesn't state "price may increase as evaluation/training progresses", I would expect the horse I go look at to be the price stated or negotiable DOWN from that.

    I always make sure the price is as stated or OBO before I even go on about the horse, much less go look at it.

    If someone jumps the price up, that has happened a time or two, I don't even answer, just thank them and walk off.
    No horse is worth dealing with those kinds of people.
    I have them backtrack then, but that is not an acceptable way to treat buyers.
    Walk off.

    Now, if a buyer is not making it's mind up and later comes back and wants the seller to stand by the old price, it is unrealistic to expect that is a given.
    When buying horses, the prices are what they are right then only.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,446

    Default Is it rude? yes..

    But if you feel the original price was a steal and are still interested, get over your insult and go look at the horse. Perform a full PPE if you like it.

    Finding a decent horse for $1k these day is beyond unrealistic and getting huffy over a sudden hike to a 'realistic' price isn't getting you a horse you want.

    This just like the buyer who comes to look at a $10k horse, loves him, takes him on trial, then comes back with an offer of $5k. It happens. You either negotiate toward the goal you want or get 'annoyed' and walk away.

    What's more important to you?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Posts
    416

    Default

    A buyer offering less than the asking price is pretty normal. I did it on horses that I had noticed had been for sale for several months. Two buyers wanting a horse and trying to out-bid each other is also normal. But the seller suddenly raising the price when someone wants a horse is weird and I never encountered that. I think I would also walk away, it makes the seller appear dishonest and I'd wonder if they were hiding something about the horse.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,572

    Default

    Yep, I have decided to leave it alone. Really, a thousand dollars here or there isn't the issue, it is more the bad feeling it leaves me with...like the fates are telling me this isn't the right horse. This would have been a project for an eventual lesson horse, not something ready right now, so no rush really, and I think my interest was mostly because his low price made him less of a risk...which may not be the best reason to buy a horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2005
    Location
    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
    Posts
    3,604

    Default

    Had a friend recently go through the same thing. Horse was listed online at X price. She called had a lovely conversation with owner , owner basically says " I think I'd like to keep him ". Horse posted again online when questioned about it "She decided to up his price because of all the responses she'd received". Annoying.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,470

    Default

    I think that if its done tactfully, then its ok. You get an overwhelming response, you realize you've underpriced, so you change the price. I think the most tactful thing would be to call any pending prospective buyers, explain the situation, and tell them you understand it may change their decision. Its within their right, even though it is a huge annoyance to a person who looked at and liked a horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,572

    Default

    The funny thing is, in Case #1, nobody looked at the horse. Horse is still for sale.

    Case #2 did have some interest at her higher price, so she was likely right to raise it (she didn't change her advertised price, she had emailed me before advertising). I don't think her choice was wrong, it is just annoying and lost a possible sale.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2005
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,074

    Default

    I think when you price a horse you price it at what they are worth or what you need to get. If you want the price to go up based on interest, auction them.

    I have a friend who has been horse shopping and this has happened on literally every horse she has been seriously interested in.

    It gets really old, especially if you have that crazy thing like a budget.

    And yes, there are bargains to be found these days, with the economy and drought in the midwest it should be a buyer's market.

    For example, there was a warmblood X gelding for sale, 13-15 years old, done NOTHING except baby hunters as a youngster. Horse was cute but a huge question mark (why didn't he do anything with his life for almost 10 years?). He was (I think fairly) priced in the $3-5k range. Friend called on him. Oh, they put him in training a month and now he's $8k. Really?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Somewhere in the Midwest
    Posts
    2,087

    Default

    Buying and Selling horses requires a lot of alcohol consumption, I am convinced. There was a, upper level but older WB gelding I loved last year for $10K. The seller was going out of the country for 2 weeks so I had to wait until she got back to arrange hiring a trainer to look at him since he was across the country. Trainer sets up a tentative appointment. I happen to look at his ad, she DOUBLED his price to 20K. It would have been nice to have been told this! She said she wanted her board and training money back...I told her I was out of the picture. At $2,000 plus a month she had him on the market for another 5 months and lost more money than if she would have sold him for the 10K. Dumb.
    I know someone that lists horses on all the free classifies with him being listed from $2000 to $12000. She thinks someone is dumb enough not to cross reference the ad and fall in love with the horse and pay all that $$$ if they see the 12,000 ad
    I will say I will change the price on Warmbloods for sale.com about $100 every week or so ($15K to $14,900 and back again etc) or make a small change because this brings the ad back to the top.



Similar Threads

  1. Would You Be Annoyed About This?
    By Snowflake in forum Off Course
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Aug. 7, 2012, 05:47 PM
  2. So annoyed at NBC
    By KatherineC in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Aug. 6, 2012, 07:32 PM
  3. Horse sellers- Would you be annoyed??
    By EqRider112 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: Jul. 17, 2012, 01:09 AM
  4. Do you get distracked.....annoyed at...
    By EasyStreet in forum Dressage
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Jan. 23, 2011, 11:38 AM
  5. So Annoyed with Craigslist Sellers
    By Katie-Nicole in forum Off Course
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Nov. 20, 2008, 03:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •