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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,346

    Default

    I wouldn't trust a rubbermaid storage tub out with my horses. Too light, too destructible.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2012
    Posts
    431

    Default

    The Porta Grazer is awesome. I think I will have to get one or see if I can make my own. My Morgan is a Hay hoover. His 2 flakes in the am are gone in an hour and I feel bad he doesn't have anything to be busy with so I wind up feeding him more. My NSH takes hours to eat her 2 flakes but with Hoover (His name is Myst) Horse I am sure he is eating hers too.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Learn from my mistakes... I tried the "heavy duty" rubbermaid bins. In theory they were great, and in fact they lasted me two winters before they were entirely destroyed. I thought, cool, they would be light so they would be mobile. What 'mobile' means to my horses is that they can relocate them all over the paddock, even push them under the electric fence, turn them upside down and apparently use them as step stools or chairs or something because they bashed them in pretty bad. Sometimes they managed to turn the upside down with the hay IN them. These aren't really destructive horses in general. Of course, the jolly ball I got for them usually remains in the exact same position, untouched.
    I was forever doing "maintenance" on the bins, fixing parts they destroyed, etc. Unless you can find extraordinarly thick or heavy bins - I'm thinking 100+ gallon water trough size - you'll be better off skipping to something more durable, unless you like the idea of disposable feeders!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2000
    Location
    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
    Posts
    6,781

    Default

    The plastic fencing lasted about five days with my horses.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Glenelg, MD
    Posts
    666

    Default

    I'm going to make some of these - they look super simple, and I like that the hay will stay dry. I do like the others, but if the hay gets wet they won't eat it. : (

    http://ryan.boren.me/2009/12/30/squa...eder/img_1414/



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    1,013

    Default

    The only redeeming value of the metal grates is their simplicity.

    Making a frame with the netting is a pain, and time consuming. I use 3/4" schedule 80 pvc with 1/2" metal conduit inside. Anything else will break. The netting must be woven onto the frame while it is still in two halves and then the frame can be put together. I used eye hooks, clips and chains at all four corners to keep the frame inside the feeder, otherwise the horses toss it out. The netting lasts for about 6 - 9 months before it needs to be replaced.

    If one were to construct a box that held captured the frame, I would bet pvc alone would be fine.

    There are lots of sources for netting out there, just search for industrial netting. I am not divulging my source

    We have been off the metal grates for 20 months now and have no new tooth damage.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
    Location
    North-Central IL
    Posts
    4,045

    Default

    Holy crap, I never thought of lattice! I'm gonna try that...
    Quarry Rat



  8. #28
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    I think you could build your own Porta Grazer type feeder
    pretty easily. Get two plastic barrels, one in55 gallon size
    and the other smaller, say 40 gallon size. Cut the larger
    one in half, unscrew the fill hole plugs and smooth the
    cut edge. Cut the smaller one a bit shorter and then cut
    a pattern of holes in the bottom of it. Put hay in the larger
    half barrel, put the smaller one over the hay, holes side
    down, voila, your own grazing system.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2012
    Posts
    431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldpony66 View Post
    Learn from my mistakes... I tried the "heavy duty" rubbermaid bins. In theory they were great, and in fact they lasted me two winters before they were entirely destroyed. I thought, cool, they would be light so they would be mobile. What 'mobile' means to my horses is that they can relocate them all over the paddock, even push them under the electric fence, turn them upside down and apparently use them as step stools or chairs or something because they bashed them in pretty bad. Sometimes they managed to turn the upside down with the hay IN them. These aren't really destructive horses in general. Of course, the jolly ball I got for them usually remains in the exact same position, untouched.
    I was forever doing "maintenance" on the bins, fixing parts they destroyed, etc. Unless you can find extraordinarly thick or heavy bins - I'm thinking 100+ gallon water trough size - you'll be better off skipping to something more durable, unless you like the idea of disposable feeders!

    I have a 80 gallon big blue rain barrel a friends neighbor gave me. I was thinking of cutting that down (Rounding off the edges) and then using a rubbermaid (clean) garbage can my hubby can drill the holes in the bottom and use that for the inside.

    I also have three Metal barrels that I could cut down, round off and use those for the outer part. This would be nice and sturdy.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
    Posts
    560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bathsheba8542 View Post
    I'm going to make some of these - they look super simple, and I like that the hay will stay dry. I do like the others, but if the hay gets wet they won't eat it. : (

    http://ryan.boren.me/2009/12/30/squa...eder/img_1414/
    This is actually really cool! With 16 horses, we have too many horses for this to be practical for us though. We'd have to build a LOT of them. It's easier for us to feed round bales. I saved the picture though, since you never know!

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow



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