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  1. #1
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    Sep. 21, 2001
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    Default Deleted :)

    I am deleting this as I did not intend to raise a ruckus or offend anyone. Happy riding, all!
    Last edited by rhymeswithfizz; Dec. 4, 2012 at 06:48 PM.
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?


    13 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
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    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Gum Tree PA
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    My wife, rather her parents she was a child at the time, had a beautiful letter opener made.
    Though we only chase fox around here and would suspect that a fox paw is smaller then a coyote. Not much use for a letter opener anymore other then to open bills.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Jan. 16, 2007
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    Okay, I have to ask. What does the tradition of being blooded mean? Why do they give you a paw?



  4. #4
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    Apr. 30, 2002
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    Wow. That is a really old tradition -- most of the hunts in my area do not kill. Very cool, and very rare, I would think. Congratulations!
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Jul. 14, 2000
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    midwest
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    Congrats on getting your first hunt done! Let the addiction to fox hunting begin.

    I think it's interesting your hunt still does blooding. Most hunts that I'm familiar with stopped that years ago because of concern of disease- mostly rabies. We'll check back on you in 10 days okay??


    16 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Dec. 25, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLW View Post
    Congrats on getting your first hunt done! Let the addiction to fox hunting begin.

    I think it's interesting your hunt still does blooding. Most hunts that I'm familiar with stopped that years ago because of concern of disease- mostly rabies. We'll check back on you in 10 days okay??
    The real reason they quit was to avoid PETA and the various other nut cases.

    In fact, the last I heard, the MFHA in the person of Dennis Foster, had to change his diaper every time anyone mentioned a kill in public.

    So it might be better if you don't say any more about it.

    I think it unreasonable, but that is the way it is.


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  7. #7
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    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Earlysville, Virginia
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    Getting blooded--can someone explain? Is this similar to when deer hunters wipe blood on the face of the hunter?
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Nov. 23, 2012
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    420

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    Social rituals are important to hunts, although many have fallen into disuse. One of the most notable was the act of blooding. This is a very old ceremony in which the master or huntsman would smear the blood of the fox or coyote onto the cheeks or forehead of a newly initiated hunt follower, often a young child. Another practice of some hunts was to cut off the tail ('brush'), the feet ('pads') and the head ('mask') as trophies, with the carcass then thrown to the dogs. Both of these practices were widely abandoned during the nineteenth century, although isolated cases may still have occurred to the modern day

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_hunting


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Jun. 13, 2001
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    usa
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    It is very unusual to have a kill unless the coyote/fox is either sick or planted. My mom was secretary hunted three days a week with her own hunt, and three with others and was only on one kill in 20 years! I have gotten the brush (first woman there usually gets that) while the first man usually gets the mask. Take the pad to a taxidermy (to a key chain/letter opener/onto a piece of wood with location and date/etc). Blooding it taking a thumb dipped in the blood and putting it onto the forehead. Blooding is good for the hound to make them quicker to get onto a scent.
    I.D.E.A. yoda


    5 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
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    Parker, Colorado
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    I am deleting this as I did not intend to raise a ruckus or offend anyone. Happy riding, all!
    Last edited by rhymeswithfizz; Dec. 4, 2012 at 06:39 PM.
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?


    7 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2006
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    107

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    At my first "accounting for" in Ireland, the Master awarded me the brush (tail), which was stuck under the girth strap for the rest of the hunt. Later, at the pub, we pulled the tail bone out and stuffed it into a bottle of denatured alcohol, and I literally bootlegged it home to America (stuck it in my boot, and stuffed dirty underwear in after it and stuck it in the suitcase.

    I've been awarded a Brush from Avon Vale in Wiltshire, and a deer hoof from Devon&Sommerset Hounds in Exmoor, both of which were professionally preserved and mounted.

    My home hunt Bull Run would occasionally blood members, having been done to me years ago.

    I still think it's a much more honorable and glorious end for a fox than dying slowly, painfully and uncommemorated in the woods somewhere.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Gum Tree PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    Getting blooded--can someone explain? Is this similar to when deer hunters wipe blood on the face of the hunter?
    Yes, I would guess it is a carry over tradition from other forms of hunting. Or visa versa.
    It is reserved for members who have never been part of a “kill”



  13. #13
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    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSquared View Post
    Social rituals are important to hunts, although many have fallen into disuse. One of the most notable was the act of blooding. This is a very old ceremony in which the master or huntsman would smear the blood of the fox or coyote onto the cheeks or forehead of a newly initiated hunt follower, often a young child. Another practice of some hunts was to cut off the tail ('brush'), the feet ('pads') and the head ('mask') as trophies, with the carcass then thrown to the dogs. Both of these practices were widely abandoned during the nineteenth century, although isolated cases may still have occurred to the modern day

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_hunting
    Funny, we have never thought of it as a “social ritual”. But I suppose it could be put that way. We are a bit of sticklers when it comes to traditions. Especially when it comes to hunting. Just don’t feel it should be californacated like what is considered “Black tie” these days. No disrespect to the good people of California.
    In our neck of the woods, the tradition after a kill is as follows;
    The mask goes to the rider and horse who is considered to have been the best in the field that day. And then in descending order the Brush (tail), Pads (paws).
    At least this is how it is with Cheshire as explained by my wife who has hunted with since childhood and is celebrating its 100th anniversary.
    I would venture to say that it is no different in Maryland, my home state, or Virginia my other adopted home state.


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  14. #14
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    A nifty little book that IMO is worth having in ones collection is called Elements of Hunting written by R. S. Summerhays. First published in 1938 and revised in 1950. An enjoyable read in the poetic English tradition of hunting which I and others from the colonies who “ride to hounds” feel bound to honor. That is not to say that things don’t change somewhat as stated in the foreword first paragraph; “It is said of hunting that it is not what it used to be, and this is true enough, although present-day hunting has much to commend it.” November 1937 R.S.S.

    In the chapter called The Fox in reference to the killing of; “The methods, apart from hunting, are shooting, poisoning, and trapping. The shoot that maims but does not kill, the poison taken which is not fatal, the trap that tears and eats into the bone are inhumanly dreadful and are sickening to witness. Fortunately few of you have seen a live, shot-ridden, gangrenous fox and one that has eaten off its own leg to free itself from a trap but I have. Hunting is the most humane method of killing, except for the shot which kill outright, for death is practically instantaneous, and, as I have assured you, only a small proportion of hunted foxes are killed.”


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  15. #15
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    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Mark View Post
    At my first "accounting for" in Ireland, the Master awarded me the brush (tail), which was stuck under the girth strap for the rest of the hunt. Later, at the pub, we pulled the tail bone out and stuffed it into a bottle of denatured alcohol, and I literally bootlegged it home to America (stuck it in my boot, and stuffed dirty underwear in after it and stuck it in the suitcase.

    I've been awarded a Brush from Avon Vale in Wiltshire, and a deer hoof from Devon&Sommerset Hounds in Exmoor, both of which were professionally preserved and mounted.

    My home hunt Bull Run would occasionally blood members, having been done to me years ago.

    I still think it's a much more honorable and glorious end for a fox than dying slowly, painfully and uncommemorated in the woods somewhere.
    Well said


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    Getting blooded--can someone explain? Is this similar to when deer hunters wipe blood on the face of the hunter?
    Yes, I would guess it is a carry over tradition from other forms of hunting. Or visa versa.
    It is reserved for members who have never been part of a “kill”



  17. #17
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    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by rememberthenight View Post
    Okay, I have to ask. What does the tradition of being blooded mean? Why do they give you a paw?
    See my post #13 which is not taken from Wikipedia. No disrespect to the KSquared.



  18. #18
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    Mar. 12, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhymeswithfizz View Post
    My first hunting experience ever was a great success!! A coyote was caught and killed, and I was officially blooded and awarded a paw by the master. It was a glorious day! My horse was a bit of a pill... He could have galloped all day long, thought that was just marvelous, but he did not approve of the walking parts in between. And there was a bit of bucking in the beginning, rather embarrassing, but he settled in once we got going.

    Now what on earth do I do with the paw? My husband is a little grossed out but my kids think it is really cool. LOL.
    Quote Originally Posted by Major Mark View Post
    At my first "accounting for" in Ireland, the Master awarded me the brush (tail), which was stuck under the girth strap for the rest of the hunt. Later, at the pub, we pulled the tail bone out and stuffed it into a bottle of denatured alcohol, and I literally bootlegged it home to America (stuck it in my boot, and stuffed dirty underwear in after it and stuck it in the suitcase.

    I've been awarded a Brush from Avon Vale in Wiltshire, and a deer hoof from Devon&Sommerset Hounds in Exmoor, both of which were professionally preserved and mounted.

    My home hunt Bull Run would occasionally blood members, having been done to me years ago.

    I still think it's a much more honorable and glorious end for a fox than dying slowly, painfully and uncommemorated in the woods somewhere.
    Seriusly? You would rather be chased down and ripped up by a mob? Barbaric rituals might have a lot to do with fox hunting getting bad "press". This reminds me of a man explaining the "honor" involved in bull fighting. Bleah.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*


    19 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Dec. 20, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumtree View Post
    Hunting is the most humane method of killing, except for the shot which kill outright, for death is practically instantaneous, and, as I have assured you, only a small proportion of hunted foxes are killed.”
    This. An ethical shot is a far better and humane end than trapping, poisoning, or disease taking its course.

    Congratulations! I second taking your trophy to a taxidermist. He/She might even have ideas as to what to craft to commemorate the occasion.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Apr. 25, 2007
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    Gosh, I've been hunting since 1969 and have never had a kill occur during a hunt. It really hasn't been the goal of any hunt I've ever belonged to (all in the US). I don't think I would care for the blooding ritual. I imagine that if our hounds ever did catch a fox or coyote it would have to be very sick or very old. Just hasn't happened yet....


    11 members found this post helpful.

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