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  1. #1
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    Aug. 6, 2000
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    lexington, virginia
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    Default Misty and horse crazy girls

    My husband, John Muncie, just wrote a column for the Rockbridge Advocate about Misty and the book's pull on horse crazy girls after watching all the women at the Virginia Tech veterinary hospital get gooey faced at the mere mention of the name, Misty.

    Fifteen years before he'd watched me cry as I stood in the viewing area on Assateague and saw for the first time, Misty's cousins. For me that book provided a lifeline through a painful (and horseless) childhood and taught me how to attach a plan to a dream. If I worked hard enough, I realized through reading and rereading that book, I could one day have a horse of my own. I have 7 now!

    What did Misty mean to you?

    And not to get too wonders of the universey on you, but just as John finished his column on Misty, a friend sent me this link. What an honor to even be on the same page as Misty and Black Beauty, the two books that formed the cornerstone of my passions for words and horses.
    http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-fu...rse-books.aspx

    Best
    Jody Jaffe


    5 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    Default

    I've got your book on my wish list, Jody .

    The very first model horse I received as a gift was, Misty, when I was about 9 or 10 (from the dad I'd never met yet). It was one that came with the book, and I still remember the smell of the plastic and the pages, and the texture of Misty's mold. Sadly, I went through some hard times after a divorce at 30 and sold it, along with all of the models I collected through my teens, at a yard sale. I still remember the man who handed me his 30 bucks for the box, and the way he tootled down the street - surely he was tallying what he had in that box while calling me a sucker under his breath. I stared at him until he was out of sight and then some....it was like saying goodbye to an old friend.

    When I was 13 my mom bought me a my first horse - a $50 Mustang from an auction in El Monte, CA. She was a chestnut, but I named her Misty. My mom sold her when I was 17 because I became interested in boys. She didn't tell me, she just old her one day. Even 33 years later, every time I meet a horse named Misty, I feel a slight swelling in my chest because I think of my sweet little mare and my toy.....yeah, there is a lot of emotion attached to Misty for me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Nov. 12, 2001
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    Dry Ridge, KY USA
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    Default

    I remember reading a lot of those older books, when I was young. Misty, The Black Stallion, Ride Like an Indian, Smokey, Heads Up and Heals Down and Black Beauty were all favorites of mine.

    I would like to add: Justin Morgan had a Horse.
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!



  4. #4
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    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    Default

    Misty made horses seem more possible to me, too.

    The first book I ever read was The Black Stallion and while I loved it, I suspected that my chances of rescuing a wild stallion during a shipwreck and taming him on a desert island while subsisting on seaweed wasn't likely to actually occur.

    But Paul and Maureen lived in the south and seemed like people I might know IRL. So I started pestering my folks for a pony and working out where we could keep it (Granny's farm seemed like a good place to me).

    Alas it wasn't to be - my dear mother thought that herbivore stuff was just propaganda and horses actually ate small children. But Daddy found ponies for me to borrow and ride at our lake property when Mama wasn't around. He finally got to buy me a pony, too - well, sort of. I was 40 years old and just finishing law school, and it was a loan. But he was tickled to finally help me get my first horse. I still have him (Daddy and the pony ) and two horses besides. And my own farm.

    I got to meet Marguerite Henry, too. She came to Greenville SC when I was in fifth grade. All the schools had an essay contest for the kids, and the winner from each school got to come to a banquet where Ms. Henry was the speaker. She was a nice lady, and autographed my copy of King of the Wind. I think my copies of Misty and Stormy and the rest were too dog-eared by then to take out in public.



  5. #5
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    Default

    I'm all verklempt with memories. What a great list - I haven't read them all, but believe the ones I have read (including Jody's!) all belong there.

    I was a spoiled kid, and therefore had my own horse - and The Black Stallion was my book because I figured if he could ride The Black with no bridle or saddle and get him to go where he wanted, surely I could learn to control my horse without having to use bridle and saddle.


    I looooved Misty, though. I want to go to Assateague and have my own Chincoteague pony some day. I lived on those islands for a while, at least in my mind.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Jan. 10, 2010
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    1,012

    Default

    i ws crazy for horses before i could even read, so misty didn't get me started, but it sure kept me fueled...........all the henry books, and i still have every single one.....and i am 54...........
    seeing the pony penning as a kid, and later as a young adult has never left my mind...........

    jody, i am glad to see YOUR book included, as i very much enjoyed ALL your books..........but dying for another adventure with brenda starrr and owner...................WHEN???oh when........lol......your books are they type that as i near the end of the book i become disappointed that my participation in the world you created will come to an end......lol



  7. #7
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    Jun. 24, 2011
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    Huntsville, AL
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    Default

    I can pretty much cover what Misty means to me by saying that this is my website: http://mistysheaven.com I read the books when I was 12 years old and I'm still rather nuts about it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2000
    Location
    lexington, virginia
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    Default

    These responses are wonderful, thank you so much. I think Im going to have to write my next column for the chron about our girl, Misty. Plus, today I stay inside and work on "Whoa Nellie," the next Nattie Gold book (except it stars Nellie Gold, her daughter)

    Here is my husband's column about Misty:

    We were looking for Misty. Jody had been looking her whole life; I'd just joined the search the day we visited Assateague National Seashore. We drove through the park, scanning the dunes and marshlands and seeing only grass. Then Jody pointed to three dark shapes on the shaggy horizon. Three wild Assateague ponies. And she started to cry.

    Words have magic. For Jody, one of the most magical is Misty. This particular Misty is the star of the classic children’s book “Misty of Chincoteague.” Written by Marguerite Henry and published in 1947, “Misty” has been for thousands, probably millions, of pre-teen girls the first kiss in a life-long love affair with horses.

    The book stars two youngsters who plan to first capture and then buy the wild mare Phantom and her foal, Misty. The plot revolves around an actual yearly event in Virginia called “The Wild Pony Swim” or “The Pony Penning.” During the event, wild horses on the barrier island of Assateague are herded across a shallow neck of water to the neighboring barrier island of Chincoteague where they are penned up and sold. Of course the “Misty” kids succeed, but not before they experience hope, despair, danger, triumph and the gentle guidance of their loving grandparents.

    “Misty of Chincoteague” is the second kids’ book I’ve read doing research for this column. The first was E.B. White’s “Charlotte’s Web.” Compared to “Misty,” “Charlotte’s Web” is “War and Peace.” Still, if the corny, heart-warming finale of “Misty” doesn’t make you a little misty-eyed you’ve forgotten the blessed innocence of your own childhood.

    When Jody first read “Misty” she had already read “Black Beauty,” that other famous horse-girl dream maker. “But it was ‘Misty,’ ” she says, “that represented to me the possibility that I could actually have a horse.”

    After reading the book, she hatched a plan to sell Salvo or Greaso or whatever it was she saw advertised in the back of an Archie comic book. She bought a carton of the stuff, then went door to door, trying to sell enough tins to get herself down to the Wild Pony Swim, buy her own Misty and bring it back to live with her in her row house in Philadelphia. She was 10 years old.

    I bring up this Misty stuff because of a visit we made recently to the veterinary hospital at Virginia Tech. We were worried about the health of two of our horses, Katie and Cassie, and we wanted the vets at Tech to X-ray them and diagnose their problems. Both had worrisome sore backs and aliens seem to have invaded Cassie’s brain and completely changed her personality.



    Aside from being equine, neither Katie nor Cassie are Misty-like. The tiny herds of horses that still roam the national and state park lands of Assateague are scrubby ponies of dubious ancestry. Legend has it that they descended from escapees of ship-wrecked Spanish galleons; more likely they’re from feral farm stock. Katie’s from a noble line of Hanoverians and Cassie’s grandfather won the Kentucky Derby. Both are big girls weighing just shy of 1,300 pounds. By comparison, Assateague ponies look like overgrown dogs. However, on the day we visited Tech, there was an Assateague pony in one of the hospital’s horse stalls. So, of course, Jody asked the Tech people, “How’s Misty doing?”

    At the time she said it, Katie was being poked and prodded by a veterinary resident, two veterinarian students and a vet-tech (a type of veterinarian nurse). All were women. At the sound of the magic word, they let out a collective sigh, a kind of cooing sound. They had all been transported back to their childhoods. Selling Greaso door-to-door.

    It may not be a scientific sample, but every horse-crazy woman I’ve ever met was a horse-crazy girl who read or read about or had some connection with “Misty of Chincoteague.” It’s so pervasive it needs a name: the Misty Syndrome.

    A few days after our Tech visit, I phoned the resident vet, Nimit Browne, who had worked on Katie and Cassie and asked her about the Misty Syndrome. Nimit grew up in Nashville and went to the University of Tennessee for vet school. Her passion is neonatal foals and when she’s done with her Tech residency she’s looking to get into a practice near a large breeding population, like Lexington, KY.

    “I am not sure why this book appeals more to young women than men,” she said, “but I think the underlying emotional attachment to both Phantom and Misty is what drew me to the book.”

    Nimit read “Misty” when she was around 9 years old. “Most girls want to have a colt of their own,” she said. “I grew up riding horses and ‘Misty’ was a way that brought all that to life in book form. As a kid, all my friends had read it as well. It was something we all talked about.” It’s also something she still deals with at Tech. “Misty is a very common name for horses,” she said, “especially in Virginia.”

    If Nimit isn’t sure about the cause of the Misty Syndrome, she’s certain it’s begun to dramatically change the veterinary profession. “Around 5-to-10 years ago, 70 percent the students in vet school were males. Now it’s 80-85 percent female. My graduating class of 67 had 8 men.

    “It’s an interesting dynamic,” she said. “The large animal field is traditionally a male field – large heavy animals.” So why has it become Misty dominated? “Well the salaries for vets haven’t changed so maybe men are going into more lucrative fields. But also the emotional attachment women have toward horses have pushed women to these jobs.”

    Both Katie and Cassie turned out to be OK. Our worst fear, that Cassie had a chronic back problem called “kissing spine,” proved groundless. When Tabby Moore, our local vet, came by Finally Farm a week or so later for a follow-up check, accompanied by vet intern Amanda Mills, I took the opportunity to mention the Misty Syndrome to them.

    “Absolutely,” said Tabby. “Of course I read ‘Misty.’” Tabby said she was around 9 at the time and the same summer she read the book her parents took her to Chincoteague. “I remember I was so disappointed that the ponies came right up and stuck their heads into the car,” she said. “They were supposed to be wild.”

    Amanda surprised me when she admitted that she hadn’t read “Misty.” But she quickly added that she’d read the sequel, “Stormy, Misty’s Foal.” “And I did grow up watching movies like ‘Black Beauty,’” she said, by way of apology.

    Neither Tabby nor Amanda was clear on the causes of the Misty Syndrome. Amanda had a kind of esthetic theory. “There’s the romantic idea of horses,” she said. “They’re so beautiful out in the field and girls are drawn to beauty.” And Tabby simply said, “Animals and horses were kind of born into me.” Then she added, “I truly get a little depressed if I don’t get my hands on a horse.”

    In a way, “Misty of Chincoteague” is the reason I’m at Poague Run and writing this column. Horses are Jody’s dream, not mine. I think they’re fine, on the other side of the fence. But she lives and breathes horses. Ever since Misty ignited her imagination she’s wanted a horse farm of her own. So I followed her as she followed that dream to Rockbridge County.

    “I won’t speak for all girls,” Jody said, when we talked about the Misty Syndrome, “but speaking for myself, I felt pretty insignificant as a kid. But sitting on the back of a horse I could image feeling significant and commanding. Making a 1,200-pound animal do your bidding is powerful, especially for me, who felt so powerless in life.

    “In the end,” she said, “it all came down to love. Here’s a creature I could pour all my love into and get it back. I love cats and dogs, too, but if I could get a magnificent animal like a horse to love me, that meant I could be somebody.”



    Earlier, I had told Nimit the story of how Jody had cried when she saw her first Assateague ponies. Of course, Nimit responded as any women with Misty Syndrome would:

    “I probably would do the same thing,” she said.

    Questions, comments? Email me at: jmuncie@aol.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 1999
    Location
    Virginia
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    14,656

    Default My mom bequeathed to me her horse books

    My earliest memories are of reading Misty and Sea Star and Stormy. In 1965, we took our summer vacation on Chincoteague for the pony penning, our first of many. We tent camped in what is now Memorial Park where the swim is held and watched the ponies come across from my dad's boat in the channel.

    Misty was still alive back then so we made the short trip to Beebe's and got to see her.

    Back then, the southern end of Assateague wasn't closed off and we took the boat into Tom's Cove, beached it and made our way through the salt marsh grasses to the dunes and the ocean, picking up seashells along the way. We had so many conch shells my dad took off his shirt to use as a makeshift bag to carry them in. It was a magical trip.

    It was on that vacation that my dad promised that, if I could save enough money for a pony at the auction, he would pay to keep it. In 1970, I got my own Chincoteague pony. We had her for 31 years.

    Years later, well after my son was born and read those same wonderful books, we were on a trip to Cape Cod via the Poconos and Catskills. My son was looking at a map and said excitedly that we were close to The Historic Track and birthplace of Hambletonian and asked if we could go there. OF COURSE WE COULD!

    One of the best things about the fiction that Ms. Henry wrote, it was based in fact with wonderful fancy added by her to create a living, breathing bit of history that captures the imagination.

    We went to the marker at Hambletonian's birthplace, took photos at his grave and toured the Goshen Historic Track creating wonderful memories of our own.
    "If you would have only one day to live, you should spend at least half of it in the saddle."



  10. #10
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    Jun. 20, 2008
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    For me Misty was everything - about 2 horse crazy kids willing to do anything to keep their pony - every kid should see the movie whether they are horse crazy or not, too many kids these days are handed things (look at the mess this country is in) or feel they can just steal from someone to in order to get one they want. Books/Movies like Misty have a good message - about life, being responsible and caring/compassion. I can't think of a recent kids movie like that. Despite old cars, clothes - the movie is timeless. I loved it!



  11. #11
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    Apr. 27, 2008
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    Do you suppose the name Misty was popular before the book? Or did the book make the name popular -- I mean as a horse name. Though, I know a woman named Misty! I always assumed she was named for "our" Misty.

    MistyStory, I've been to your website before. Love it! Nice to meet you!

    What part of the Misty story that Marguerite Henry wrote is true? I mean, Misty couldn't have lived the life Marguerite wrote about if she lived with Marguerite, right? And if Misty were the kids' special pony, Grandpa surely wouldn't have sold her to Marguerite.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden



  12. #12
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    Sep. 19, 2008
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    Half past the point of oblivion
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    I read and loved Misty, but I already had a pony of my own. I was far more influenced by Jean Slaughter Doty and A Very Young Rider and (criminally missing from that list) Lynn Hall.

    Sorry for the side track, but how on earth could Lynn Hall not be on that list!
    Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian



  13. #13
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    Jun. 24, 2011
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    MistyStory, I've been to your website before. Love it! Nice to meet you!
    Hello! Glad you like it

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    What part of the Misty story that Marguerite Henry wrote is true? I mean, Misty couldn't have lived the life Marguerite wrote about if she lived with Marguerite, right? And if Misty were the kids' special pony, Grandpa surely wouldn't have sold her to Marguerite.
    As Marguerite herself put it the places, events, and ponies were all real. However, they didn’t all happen together or at the same time. You’re correct, Misty didn’t live that life as she was shipped to Marguerite after she was weaned and stayed in Illinois for over 10 years. Most of Marguerite’s books were all taken from fact and then she artfully weaved the facts into a fiction story. For example, Grandpa, Grandma, Paul, and Maureen were all real people but the story of them buying Phantom and Misty is fiction although it may be based off stories of other children. Stormy is almost entirely true, but it happened to a different family of Beebe’s (Grandpa, Grandma, and Paul all died well prior to the 1962 Nor’easter) and Stormy was Misty’s last foal rather than her first.

    I sometimes hate to share the story of the real Misty because it can be a bit of a buzzkill after the books we all know so well. Life story and pictures of the real Misty if anyone is interested: http://www.mistysheaven.com/mistyhistoryindex.html


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Apr. 27, 2008
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    MistyStormy, on your website you say that the ponies on Assateague are not related to Misty. How is that possible? Are the Chincoteaque ponies and the Assateaque ponies not from common ancestors?

    Also, do you know what the island names mean?

    It slays me to read on your website that the site of Grandpa Beebe's pony farm is now developed. Imagine a nail salon and a self-store-your-crap garage on that hallowed site! Ugh. Also sad to read that Paul, who many of us think of as a childhood friend actually died before many of us were born.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2003
    Posts
    1,702

    Default Loved the column - and all Marguerite Henry's books

    Horse books were the only books I read as a kid. All of Margeurite Henry's books, Walter Farley, Sam Savitt, Jean Slaughter Doty. My name literally filled the check out card at my school library for Pony Care. (I think that was one of hers.) This thread brings back wonderful memories of those books.

    My best friend was also horse crazy, and we used to play Black Stallion and Misty with our Breyers, using our "Proud Arabian Stallions" as Shetan and the others. We also made stick horses and rode them around our suburban neighborhood. I think my dad still has one of mine somewhere.

    Great thread - thanks for sharing. :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by jody jaffe View Post
    These responses are wonderful, thank you so much. I think Im going to have to write my next column for the chron about our girl, Misty. Plus, today I stay inside and work on "Whoa Nellie," the next Nattie Gold book (except it stars Nellie Gold, her daughter)

    Here is my husband's column about Misty:

    We were looking for Misty. Jody had been looking her whole life; I'd just joined the search the day we visited Assateague National Seashore. We drove through the park, scanning the dunes and marshlands and seeing only grass. Then Jody pointed to three dark shapes on the shaggy horizon. Three wild Assateague ponies. And she started to cry.

    Words have magic. For Jody, one of the most magical is Misty. This particular Misty is the star of the classic children’s book “Misty of Chincoteague.” Written by Marguerite Henry and published in 1947, “Misty” has been for thousands, probably millions, of pre-teen girls the first kiss in a life-long love affair with horses.

    The book stars two youngsters who plan to first capture and then buy the wild mare Phantom and her foal, Misty. The plot revolves around an actual yearly event in Virginia called “The Wild Pony Swim” or “The Pony Penning.” During the event, wild horses on the barrier island of Assateague are herded across a shallow neck of water to the neighboring barrier island of Chincoteague where they are penned up and sold. Of course the “Misty” kids succeed, but not before they experience hope, despair, danger, triumph and the gentle guidance of their loving grandparents.

    “Misty of Chincoteague” is the second kids’ book I’ve read doing research for this column. The first was E.B. White’s “Charlotte’s Web.” Compared to “Misty,” “Charlotte’s Web” is “War and Peace.” Still, if the corny, heart-warming finale of “Misty” doesn’t make you a little misty-eyed you’ve forgotten the blessed innocence of your own childhood.

    When Jody first read “Misty” she had already read “Black Beauty,” that other famous horse-girl dream maker. “But it was ‘Misty,’ ” she says, “that represented to me the possibility that I could actually have a horse.”

    After reading the book, she hatched a plan to sell Salvo or Greaso or whatever it was she saw advertised in the back of an Archie comic book. She bought a carton of the stuff, then went door to door, trying to sell enough tins to get herself down to the Wild Pony Swim, buy her own Misty and bring it back to live with her in her row house in Philadelphia. She was 10 years old.

    I bring up this Misty stuff because of a visit we made recently to the veterinary hospital at Virginia Tech. We were worried about the health of two of our horses, Katie and Cassie, and we wanted the vets at Tech to X-ray them and diagnose their problems. Both had worrisome sore backs and aliens seem to have invaded Cassie’s brain and completely changed her personality.



    Aside from being equine, neither Katie nor Cassie are Misty-like. The tiny herds of horses that still roam the national and state park lands of Assateague are scrubby ponies of dubious ancestry. Legend has it that they descended from escapees of ship-wrecked Spanish galleons; more likely they’re from feral farm stock. Katie’s from a noble line of Hanoverians and Cassie’s grandfather won the Kentucky Derby. Both are big girls weighing just shy of 1,300 pounds. By comparison, Assateague ponies look like overgrown dogs. However, on the day we visited Tech, there was an Assateague pony in one of the hospital’s horse stalls. So, of course, Jody asked the Tech people, “How’s Misty doing?”

    At the time she said it, Katie was being poked and prodded by a veterinary resident, two veterinarian students and a vet-tech (a type of veterinarian nurse). All were women. At the sound of the magic word, they let out a collective sigh, a kind of cooing sound. They had all been transported back to their childhoods. Selling Greaso door-to-door.

    It may not be a scientific sample, but every horse-crazy woman I’ve ever met was a horse-crazy girl who read or read about or had some connection with “Misty of Chincoteague.” It’s so pervasive it needs a name: the Misty Syndrome.

    A few days after our Tech visit, I phoned the resident vet, Nimit Browne, who had worked on Katie and Cassie and asked her about the Misty Syndrome. Nimit grew up in Nashville and went to the University of Tennessee for vet school. Her passion is neonatal foals and when she’s done with her Tech residency she’s looking to get into a practice near a large breeding population, like Lexington, KY.

    “I am not sure why this book appeals more to young women than men,” she said, “but I think the underlying emotional attachment to both Phantom and Misty is what drew me to the book.”

    Nimit read “Misty” when she was around 9 years old. “Most girls want to have a colt of their own,” she said. “I grew up riding horses and ‘Misty’ was a way that brought all that to life in book form. As a kid, all my friends had read it as well. It was something we all talked about.” It’s also something she still deals with at Tech. “Misty is a very common name for horses,” she said, “especially in Virginia.”

    If Nimit isn’t sure about the cause of the Misty Syndrome, she’s certain it’s begun to dramatically change the veterinary profession. “Around 5-to-10 years ago, 70 percent the students in vet school were males. Now it’s 80-85 percent female. My graduating class of 67 had 8 men.

    “It’s an interesting dynamic,” she said. “The large animal field is traditionally a male field – large heavy animals.” So why has it become Misty dominated? “Well the salaries for vets haven’t changed so maybe men are going into more lucrative fields. But also the emotional attachment women have toward horses have pushed women to these jobs.”

    Both Katie and Cassie turned out to be OK. Our worst fear, that Cassie had a chronic back problem called “kissing spine,” proved groundless. When Tabby Moore, our local vet, came by Finally Farm a week or so later for a follow-up check, accompanied by vet intern Amanda Mills, I took the opportunity to mention the Misty Syndrome to them.

    “Absolutely,” said Tabby. “Of course I read ‘Misty.’” Tabby said she was around 9 at the time and the same summer she read the book her parents took her to Chincoteague. “I remember I was so disappointed that the ponies came right up and stuck their heads into the car,” she said. “They were supposed to be wild.”

    Amanda surprised me when she admitted that she hadn’t read “Misty.” But she quickly added that she’d read the sequel, “Stormy, Misty’s Foal.” “And I did grow up watching movies like ‘Black Beauty,’” she said, by way of apology.

    Neither Tabby nor Amanda was clear on the causes of the Misty Syndrome. Amanda had a kind of esthetic theory. “There’s the romantic idea of horses,” she said. “They’re so beautiful out in the field and girls are drawn to beauty.” And Tabby simply said, “Animals and horses were kind of born into me.” Then she added, “I truly get a little depressed if I don’t get my hands on a horse.”

    In a way, “Misty of Chincoteague” is the reason I’m at Poague Run and writing this column. Horses are Jody’s dream, not mine. I think they’re fine, on the other side of the fence. But she lives and breathes horses. Ever since Misty ignited her imagination she’s wanted a horse farm of her own. So I followed her as she followed that dream to Rockbridge County.

    “I won’t speak for all girls,” Jody said, when we talked about the Misty Syndrome, “but speaking for myself, I felt pretty insignificant as a kid. But sitting on the back of a horse I could image feeling significant and commanding. Making a 1,200-pound animal do your bidding is powerful, especially for me, who felt so powerless in life.

    “In the end,” she said, “it all came down to love. Here’s a creature I could pour all my love into and get it back. I love cats and dogs, too, but if I could get a magnificent animal like a horse to love me, that meant I could be somebody.”



    Earlier, I had told Nimit the story of how Jody had cried when she saw her first Assateague ponies. Of course, Nimit responded as any women with Misty Syndrome would:

    “I probably would do the same thing,” she said.

    Questions, comments? Email me at: jmuncie@aol.com



  16. #16
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    Mar. 18, 2007
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    344

    Default Reader for life

    Misty was a wonderful book and the illustrations are breathtaking. It was the first book I brought home from the library and read cover to cover. It opened a gate to all the wonderful horse books and the pleasures of reading. Long live Misty and Ms. Henry and Mr. Dennis.



  17. #17
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    MistyStormy, on your website you say that the ponies on Assateague are not related to Misty. How is that possible? Are the Chincoteaque ponies and the Assateaque ponies not from common ancestors?
    There may be very distant cousins or such out there. Considering the amount of outcrossing that's occurred since then and since Grandpa Beebe had his own herd they would be very far removed. The current feral ponies are pretty far removed from their own original "ancestors" also. The bottom line is there are no Misty descendants on Assateague. It's a question that gets asked a lot so that's why I put that in there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    Also, do you know what the island names mean?
    They are derived from Native American words. There are meanings floating around out there, but a lot of modern historians don't think there's any truth behind it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    It slays me to read on your website that the site of Grandpa Beebe's pony farm is now developed. Imagine a nail salon and a self-store-your-crap garage on that hallowed site! Ugh.
    There are a couple houses on the property where their house was. It's enough off the beaten path that commercial development is unlikely. Beebe Ranch, where Misty lived most of her life, is thankfully preserved and is was a private residence last time I was there (I need to do a bit of website updating).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Misty meant so much to me I went and bought a filly at the 2003 pony auction. Her name is Lily O'Teague and she sent you a facebook friend request. She was my son's 4H project for many years, but he outgrew her, so she just eats and gets fatter!



  19. #19
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    How awesome! I ADORED Misty and Seastar and King of the Wind (Sham!) and Justin Morgan had a Horse. Also went to Chincoteague and Asssateague-what others have said about the theme of kids working to keep a horse,but it in my mind was as much about the area as well. Just loved her books-something about the magic that happens between kids and horses!



  20. #20
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    I know I am alittle late..but would it be OK if I shared your husband's article with my husband? He seems like he functions on the same wavelength as my husband regarding Misty and the Chincoteague Ponies.

    I read Misty, and all Marguerite Henry's other books. While I grew up riding, those ponies were something I could never quite forget or let go of as a "childhood dream".

    Into my mid twenties, married..I finally was able to bring home my own CP..a yearling filly named Pie...she is my horsey soulmate..I love her dearly..not just for what she is, but for what she means to ME. When we go to presentations on the CP or to schools to talk to kids about Misty..I love it..giving people something live and fuzzy to touch. Pie was joined by Beebe 2 years later, who is ridden by my son.

    Pie keeps a blog
    www.slidebythesea.wordpress.com



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