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  1. #1
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    Question Best Barefoot Book

    I am looking for recommendations for a owner interested in learning more about barefoot trimming on my own horse. What are the best books to learn about hoof anatomy, barefoot performance and trimming. Thanks.



  2. #2
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    Dec. 3, 2002
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    I started out with Jaime Jackson's books when the wild horse trim was first popular. Then I progressed to several others including Hildrud Strasser.
    there is some overlap among them but you will pick up good info from each one. Also a very good CD tutorial is by Gene Orvicek. It's clear and concise and great for getting you started. You will learn as you go along so it's better to be exposed to several different trimmers as some have their own style.



  3. #3
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    look up brotherhood of the working farrier, they probably have some book recommendations but they also do hands on classes around the U.S. where they will work with you trimming your own horses.



  4. #4
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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  5. #5
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    Jul. 25, 2007
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    Anything by Pete Ramey...his DVD series "Under the Horse" is really useful.

    http://www.hoofrehab.com/index.htm


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    I think the OP is asking a fair question, not trying to start a debate as you just have.

    I agree Pete Ramey's book and/or DVD's are a good start.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    I'm determined to get a thumbs down for this.

    Do what so many other people do - find someone who took a two week instructional course, and take one from them. Then go to the web and read everybody's sites and presto - you will be as skilled as most of the self-styled trimmers. (Note that most trims are done on a barefoot horse). Then, if the horse rides sound, you have a barefoot horse.

    Make sure they know whether the coffin bone should be level with the ground, or not, etc. Some do and some don't know.

    There are a couple of posters here who have some credibility imo.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JLR1 View Post
    Anything by Pete Ramey...his DVD series "Under the Horse" is really useful.

    http://www.hoofrehab.com/index.htm
    That is an excellent DVD and I also highly recommend it.



  9. #9
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    Sep. 17, 2010
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    This is best advice given on this one. Excellent book, couldn't agree more
    5 stars, outstanding Tom


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  10. #10
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonofasailor View Post
    This is best advice given on this one. Excellent book, couldn't agree more
    5 stars, outstanding Tom
    Oh but that book is written by a highly qualified and successful farrier. By comparison, Ramey and Jackson are admitted failures at farriery.


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  11. #11
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    Feb. 28, 2001
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    Try Feet First by Nic Barker.



  12. #12
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    Dec. 30, 2006
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    I will add not a book but a strong recommendation that if you undertake any self trimming of your horse - you should retain the services of a good farrier to balance up your work should you go astray with your inexperienced eyes and hands.

    ANd you will go astray no matter the book or online assistance. Both are inadequate as competent support for you and your horse. These sources are good conversation and consideration starters but they will not get the job done right.

    The people I know of who are successful with self trims have such an arrangement. And successful is a ridden sound horse.
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    I'm determined to get a thumbs down for this.

    Do what so many other people do - find someone who took a two week instructional course, and take one from them. Then go to the web and read everybody's sites and presto - you will be as skilled as most of the self-styled trimmers. (Note that most trims are done on a barefoot horse). Then, if the horse rides sound, you have a barefoot horse.

    Make sure they know whether the coffin bone should be level with the ground, or not, etc. Some do and some don't know.

    There are a couple of posters here who have some credibility imo.
    I'll gladly give you a thumbs down because this post is offensive. Happy now?

    I would imagine that most people who trim learn from someone else (a farrier or trimmer) and they also just learn by experience, like everyone else.

    OP I don't have a book to recommend but I have found the articles on Pete Ramey's website to be helpful.


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  14. #14
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karma View Post
    I am looking for recommendations for a owner interested in learning more about barefoot trimming on my own horse. What are the best books to learn about hoof anatomy, barefoot performance and trimming. Thanks.
    The idea that you can learn to trim a horse, any horse, from reading a book or watching a DVD, no matter how good, is wildly misplaced.

    Going to a multi-day school/course is a much better way and will certainly give a much better knowledge base.

    But consider that a professional farrier and/or trimmer with a successful practice will trim a dozen or more horses in a day and a few hundred in the same time that an owner might trim one or two. Even assuming dead equal knowledge who is going to have the most experience? And the higher "hands on" skill level?

    There's a TV commercial out there about not letting your doctor do your job nor you trying to do his/hers. That advice is applies to equine foot care, too.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


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  15. #15
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    I don't think you are going to get what you are looking for in a book. Until recently I trimmed all of my own and only used a farrier for when I had a horse that needed shoes. I took a semester's long course, but had previously had plenty of equine anatomy and physiology courses in college. Doing the farrier course without that very strong working knowledge of anatomy would have been difficult if not pointless.
    PS- for those of you wondering about why I no longer trim all of mine- it is only because my brother is now a farrier and trims them for me
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Oh but that book is written by a highly qualified and successful farrier. By comparison, Ramey and Jackson are admitted failures at farriery.
    Another excellent point worth noting Don't forget KC!



  17. #17
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    If you are just starting to learn - frankly I'd bypass most 'barefoot' books, and cosy up to a full on farrier manual. I'm sure some of the farriers here could suggest some good solid educational books that cover well used/proven methodologies, explanations, all that weighty stuff that goes into understanding the whole horse/ biomechanics etc. I'm at work or I'd give you a list of the ones I 've read/have at home, but it's been awhile, so I'm leery of giving a list of probably 'not quite' right titles.

    And then.. find yourself a good farrier to hang out with, who is willing to mentor you if you want to go past the book learning phase.

    It really is worth learning from & having a working relationship with a farrier -
    I have all barefoot competitive horses. - but I don't have a barefoot trimmer.

    I have a farrier.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.


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  18. #18
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    Sep. 17, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainechyldes View Post

    I have all barefoot competitive horses. - but I don't have a barefoot trimmer.

    I have a farrier.
    Good on you rainchyldes



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonofasailor View Post
    Another excellent point worth noting Don't forget KC!
    KC is a credentialed farrier.



  20. #20
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    Sep. 17, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    KC is a credentialed farrier.
    That and .025 will get you a cup of coffee down town. Before you launch into a spiel about the excellent organizational credential he holds, first just tell us all whether he earned it or was he grandfathered in as a charter member of that esteemed group?

    I've seen the guy in action at various horse expos and such. He's a charlatan, a liar and a fraud who holds a mail order PhD that he didn't earn either.

    Is it not a fact that he washed out as so many do and couldn't make a living on Long Island as a farrier so instead decided to be a barefoot guru as fleecing suckers is much more lucrative than making an honest living?

    As I see it the man has earned nothing, least of all his place in the industry.



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